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My '73 needs a new headliner...material long gone, perf board falling apart. PO painted car black, and I live in Phoenix. When I bought the car, my first thought is that black HAS to go, but it's slowly starting to grow on me.

I've been thinking about laying down something like Dynaliner on the roof for heat rejection and rattle control, but as I haven't driven the car yet for more than about a quarter mile, I don't if rattle/ringing will even be an issue on these cars.

I'm not trying to make it Caddy quiet inside...as the big block and big exhaust will prevent that anyways, lol. But I do plan on installing a decent sound system with subwoofers, so panel rattle will be a concern.

I'm really just just looking at this as a preventative thing, "while it's apart", rather than having to go back in there. I'm also not a brand whore, so it doesn't HAVE to be Dynamat/Dynaliner, just using that as the well known example
 

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This is what I used. I don't remember where I purchased it but I wanted a spray on product because I was afraid of using a dynamat type of sticky back product and having it sag into the headliner. The boom matt looks and feels like a rubber based undercoat. Probably exactly what it is. You can make multiple coats if you like. I can definitely notice it took the tinniness out of the roof and it is much lighter than the foil lined tar matt stick on stuff.
 

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This is what I used. I don't remember where I purchased it but I wanted a spray on product because I was afraid of using a dynamat type of sticky back product and having it sag into the headliner. The boom matt looks and feels like a rubber based undercoat. Probably exactly what it is. You can make multiple coats if you like. I can definitely notice it took the tinniness out of the roof and it is much lighter than the foil lined tar matt stick on stuff.
👍 best answer
 

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Smarter to spray then have a mat fall on headliner on underside, Nightmare for sure 👍
i've read about these different matts to put on the roof for a heat an sound deadener. an one of my thoughts has been after X amount of years glues start to wear out an matts fall to the underside of the headliner.

so a family member owns RETRO FOAM, it's for house walls, under house, an attics. an sticks to anything an weighs like almost feathers instead of these matts. after the install it can be trimmed, sanded to the shape or curve needed. i thought like spray the foam with all the bows in place so after the foam cures the bows would work as like a templet for shaping the foam. i don't know the R-factor but bet it's better than the matt. i'm not trying to sell this foam, just a possible idea for you guys in the hotter states. it was only 62 this morning for a fathers day cruise.
 
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Whatever mat you choose do not put all of the pieces edge to edge. In other words you can cut the material into 2" long strips and leave a 1" or 2" gap between the next one. If you cover every square inch you'll be installing like 30 pounds of material to the roof. I used to do audio installs and in the majority of cases more isn't better and it always drove me crazy when guys would buy 100 lbs of the stuff! When if installed properly the job can be done with much less.
I only installed heat insulating material on my roof. If I was to do it all over again I would:
1) use a heat insulating spray like lizard skin first (there's a cheaper amazon equivalent now too)
2) install strips of dynamat (or whatever "mat" you choose) and keep in mind the aluminum backed products are sharp! Use gloves and lots of pressure to get the mat to adhere and conform to the surfaces since there is no real adhesive. Also don't use any adhesive and make absolutely any substrate covered is clean and oil free.
3) I would then use the thin 1/8" dynapad or equivalent.
4) install headliner.
 

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Quit worrying about Fat Mat falling from the roof. It will never happen. Do a little test somewhere else and try to remove it. I used a heat gun and warmed the surface and the mat before installing. Use a small roller to go over the area. I did every surface I could reach on my wagon.
100% correct. There is no real "adhesive" to worry about. Just make sure the surface is dirt and oil free and use a roller and other tools to apply pressure into all the nooks and crannies. Butt of screw drivers and plastic prying tools work really good.
 

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Go to Lowes or Home Depot and get the Mylar faced bubble wrap, a roll will set you back a whopping $30.
Bubble wrap insulation

And then get “Killmat” off of Amazon. Put just a couple of pieces of the Killmat on the roof metal, just enough to keep the metal from drumming. Roll it/form it on really, really well- when the embossed pattern disappears from the foil it is rolled enough. As noted above improvise for rolling it down, I used a large spoon for quite a bit of it.
The Killmat is a fraction of the cost of Dynamat and works just as well.
Now take the bubbley wrap and dry fit it. Use 3M spray adhesive #90 to glue the wrap to the roof with it. Glue it really well. DO NOT USE 3M 77! It will not last in extreme heat.
The stuff is amazing, it weighs nothing and really helps keep the heat at bay. You can put it under your carpet as well and it will make a huge difference.
If it falls onto the headliner it won’t damage it.
I did the interior of my ‘82 Vette and if you have ever been in a C3 you know they are an oven.
It cut the heat tremendously and was well worth a day putting it in.
I will do the same thing to the Nova when it’s interior time.
 

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I honestly can't imagine dynamat drooping down in anyones lifetime. I guess anything is possible and with heat warming up the roof and transferring into the dynamat, it's a possibility. Just seems a bit unlikely. I do however; agree with the folks who said about applying a bunch of this stuff to the roof. It's extremely heavy. It feels like lead or something and putting a bunch of it on the roof would probably be overkill. If I did any sort of sound insulation, I'd probably just run a few strips of it on the roof honestly to stop the panel from carrying the harmonics of the car and sound system.
 

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I did Be Quiet mat. Very similar to dynamat. Did the whole roof. It's been a few years and so far, so good. Definitely much cooler on hot summer days.
 

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Whatever mat you choose do not put all of the pieces edge to edge. In other words you can cut the material into 2" long strips and leave a 1" or 2" gap between the next one. If you cover every square inch you'll be installing like 30 pounds of material to the roof. I used to do audio installs and in the majority of cases more isn't better and it always drove me crazy when guys would buy 100 lbs of the stuff! When if installed properly the job can be done with much less.
I only installed heat insulating material on my roof. If I was to do it all over again I would:
1) use a heat insulating spray like lizard skin first (there's a cheaper amazon equivalent now too)
2) install strips of dynamat (or whatever "mat" you choose) and keep in mind the aluminum backed products are sharp! Use gloves and lots of pressure to get the mat to adhere and conform to the surfaces since there is no real adhesive. Also don't use any adhesive and make absolutely any substrate covered is clean and oil free.
3) I would then use the thin 1/8" dynapad or equivalent.
4) install headliner.
mentioned this multiple times with a link explaining it. most people put it in every square inch like they are laying carpet. waste of money, time, and it makes the car heavier. what's that about leading a horse to water..?

-Rusty
 

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I'd be interested in seeing before and after comparison on heat inside the car. I'm in Florida and it gets HOT in the car. I have factory air and it mostly can keep up. I did ceramic tint on all the windows, that helped a lot. My headliner popped one seam, if it can't be fixed and I have to replace it, I would consider something on the inside of the roof if it really helps.
 

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I say its completely worthwhile. I just finished covering my floor and rear seat divider with Kilmat so far. Only drove it for an hour or so on a warm SoCal afternoon and it was night and day with helping block the heat from the firewall and floor in the exhaust areas. Sound was decreased also.

I know alot of people say you don't need to cover everything, but only strategically place it. Otherwise its a waste of time, money, and weight. It cost an extra $30 worth of mat to cover the floor wall to wall and that extra 25 lbs isn't too worrisome since this ultimately will be meant as a highway cruiser not a strip car. Since I had the entire interior removed I wanted to only do the floor once and not wonder if it could have been cooler or quieter.

I am going to cover underneath the rear shelf and inside the doors as much as I can as well, weight be damned. If and when I ever have a need to pull the new-ish headliner down, I'll do the roof too.

Warning, this s*** is as sticky as the tar pits that the dinosaurs got stuck in leading to their extinction... so I am 100% certain its on there for the life of the car whether you want it or not.

I need to get this as quiet and cool inside so that the family will cruise with me so an extra 100 lbs and $100 will be well worth it. Otherwise I'll be riding around alone... :)
 

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Personally, I am looking to install the most effective heat/noise solution. Not too worried about cost but I don't want to spend extra when there is a cheaper alternative. As far as a product delaminating from the roof... I'm in Texas and obviously gets hot here but after all the time and money i will have spent on this car, it will be garage kept and only taken out on fair weather days so I'm not too worried about it getting hot enough to delaminate the liner.
 

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as dan64 mentioned, the stuff is sticky. I can’t imagine it falling off the roof personally. I’m not sure how great of a heat insulator dynamat is but it is a great sound deadener (not sound proofer).

Think of it this way…a cymbal like a rock drummer has. If he nails the cymbal with his stick the cymbal will ring out. If the drummer grabs the cymbal, it no longer rings. Dynamat basically will stop panels from ringing. It’s super dense stuff as I mentioned, it’s like lead. I can't really speak to how great it stops heat or whatever because the places I've used it were actually in a recording sort of setup, not a car.
 

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noico has a foam that I added to my jeep. Super sticky too, I put it over killmat. I think it helped, but the soft top and mud tires make it hard to tell. I definitely think the combo helped with heat from the trans tunnel/ firewall/ floor along with the rubber floor mats. I went from bare floor to all of the things and it definitely helped.
 
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