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I have noticed on the Gen II cars that the doors on lighter tone colors always seem to not match the fenders and quarters when standing at different angles. At first I thought it was just my car, but then I saw it on a lemonwood yellow 67 and a white 66. Is it the curvature of the door panels? Anyone know why this is? Here is an example in Silver



https://www.ebay.com/itm/1966-Nova-...dda00ac:g:~vgAAOSwvapcJbCv:rk:27:pf:0&vxp=mtr
 

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It has to do with the quarter panel on how it bubbles out directly from where the edge is. The door is flat right to the edge and the quarter starts to bubble out right away. This gives the eye a false color difference. Its called the flop/flip/side tone in the paint world. The 2010+ Camaro are the same way. GM has a TDS(technical data sheet) stating some colors won't match from factory because of this.
 

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It has to do with the quarter panel on how it bubbles out directly from where the edge is. The door is flat right to the edge and the quarter starts to bubble out right away. This gives the eye a false color difference. Its called the flop/flip/side tone in the paint world. The 2010+ Camaro are the same way. GM has a TDS(technical data sheet) stating some colors won't match from factory because of this.
In the last sentence do you mean the colors won't 'appear' to match, or they won't match?

Bob
 

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Wont appear to match. Heres the article off another website. I'll post the link to as there are some photos to show you some more examples.

In the months since the 2010 Camaro has gone on sale, there have been some photos posted which have led members to point out what appeared to be paint mismatches between certain body panels on the car. GM has always maintained that there is indeed no paint mismatch and what was being observed was simply a “perceived” mismatch in color/shade due to the viewing angle and the Camaro’s panel geometry. To better assuage Camaro owners (and potential owners) and to formally address the issue, GM has now issued Bulletin #09-08-51-004 (Information on Door and Quarter Panel Paint Appearance – (Sep 10, 2009)). According to the GM bulletin:

On the 2010 Camaro, the shade of paint on the doors may appear to be different than the shade of paint on the quarter panels. This appearance varies in severity based on different viewing angles and light conditions. This perception is more apparent with certain colors.

At the time of vehicle manufacture, the complete sheet metal body of the car is painted at the same time (the body, hood, decklid and doors). The panels (doors, hood and decklid) are attached to the vehicle and in the proper position when it goes through the plant paint process. All of the panels receive the undercoat layers and top coat finishes using the same material, application process and final bake process. This continuity of process ensures a uniform paint application to the entire vehicle. The result of this extensive process is a seamless paint match over the entire vehicle. The only major exterior panels that do not get painted during this process are the bumper fascias. The bumper fascias receive a flexible paint application using a unique process. All of the paint used in the paint process is matched to a paint color standard, ensuring that the colors are consistent from batch to batch. This color standard also ensures consistency from vehicle to vehicle.

On the Camaro, the door to quarter panel angle match is the design intent. The geometry of the quarter panel provides a sporty definition and highlights the depth of the design. It is intended to show the color variation created by angling the body panels a few degrees.


https://www.camaro5.com/gm-bulletin-on-perceived-paint-mismatch-on-door-and-quarter-panel-paint-appearance/
 

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I have noticed on the Gen II cars that the doors on lighter tone colors always seem to not match the fenders and quarters when standing at different angles. At first I thought it was just my car, but then I saw it on a lemonwood yellow 67 and a white 66. Is it the curvature of the door panels? Anyone know why this is? Here is an example in Silver



https://www.ebay.com/itm/1966-Nova-...dda00ac:g:~vgAAOSwvapcJbCv:rk:27:pf:0&vxp=mtr
With older cars that have been blown apart for painting if the body panels are not painted in the proper orientation to how they are installed on the car when the paint is being applied the paint can look different even though the paint all came from the same source.. Metallics are more sensitive to this.
 
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