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i had to use the 45 degree angle bar to compress mine. the screw type didnt fit by the heater motor. :eek:
I've got one of those too...:yes: Old school!!

The one 71ss gave the link to, the bar can be "Spun" so it compresses in ANY direction so your heater box wouldn't spoil your party.:yes:
 

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I've got one of those too...:yes: Old school!!

The one 71ss gave the link to, the bar can be "Spun" so it compresses in ANY direction so your heater box wouldn't spoil your party.:yes:
if i have to do it again thats probably what ill go with. the bar though worked pretty damn well :cool:
 

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if i have to do it again thats probably what ill go with. the bar though worked pretty damn well :cool:
Yeah the old school bar works quite well. It just requires more effort.:yes:
 

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6cyl.- No Valve Spring Compressor Required

Just redid the valves on my 230ci inline 6 and a very experienced mechanic showed me how to take the springs off. Note: the head was on a bench and not in-chassis.

Take 1/2" drive breaker bar with a 3/4" deep well socket, **** the socket and handle 90 deg. to each other and place open end of socket over the valve stem on top of the spring seat. User a hammer and firmly whack the top of the socket/breaker bar. This momentarily compresses the spring causing the keepers to pop right out. The socket also captures them and keeps them from getting lost. This method works quite well and is very fast. I would not do this in-chassis. Be sure to use a deep well socket to avoid banging up the valve end with the interior of the socket.

To put the keepers back in, place a small block of wood under the head of the valve to keep it from slding out, install seals, spring and seat. Now, place the keepers loosely in the little grooves where they are going to go. Take a pair of channel locks or some thing similar and carefully place the handles crossways on the spring seat and with your own weight, push the springs down slowly until the keepers drop right into their slots. If only one goes in, you need to rock your channel locks a little and compress more to the side of the loose keeper to allow the other keeper to fall into place. Then gently with a piece of wood, tap the end of the valve stem to compress the spring a couple of times to ensure the keepers are secure.

These methods are backyard methods, but will remove all the valves in about 10 min. and can reistall them in about 15min. and you don't have to buy a $50. tool to do it. Note: This method was not tried on any other type of engine.
 

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Just redid the valves on my 230ci inline 6 and a very experienced mechanic showed me how to take the springs off. Note: the head was on a bench and not in-chassis.

Take 1/2" drive breaker bar with a 3/4" deep well socket, **** the socket and handle 90 deg. to each other and place open end of socket over the valve stem on top of the spring seat. User a hammer and firmly whack the top of the socket/breaker bar. This momentarily compresses the spring causing the keepers to pop right out. The socket also captures them and keeps them from getting lost. This method works quite well and is very fast. I would not do this in-chassis. Be sure to use a deep well socket to avoid banging up the valve end with the interior of the socket.

To put the keepers back in, place a small block of wood under the head of the valve to keep it from slding out, install seals, spring and seat. Now, place the keepers loosely in the little grooves where they are going to go. Take a pair of channel locks or some thing similar and carefully place the handles crossways on the spring seat and with your own weight, push the springs down slowly until the keepers drop right into their slots. If only one goes in, you need to rock your channel locks a little and compress more to the side of the loose keeper to allow the other keeper to fall into place. Then gently with a piece of wood, tap the end of the valve stem to compress the spring a couple of times to ensure the keepers are secure.

These methods are backyard methods, but will remove all the valves in about 10 min. and can reistall them in about 15min. and you don't have to buy a $50. tool to do it. Note: This method was not tried on any other type of engine.
Yeah....With springs that may only have 75 to 90 pounds of seat pressure there's a lot of little old school tricks that will work.

On the car with springs that set up in the 130 range it's a different story.:yes: And forget about a decent set of roller springs.:eek:
 

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been using the Summit/jegs style compressor since Moroso invented it back in the late 70's... I guess the patten rights have expired since then!:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks guys, I guess I'll splurge and get the better one. at least I don't have to worry about the heater box. The springs comming out are about 101 lbs and the ones going in are about 130 at the seat.

Veno,

I got my behive valve springs, rockers, and chromolly push rods. I'll start putting them in as soon as the transmission is done.

Dave
 

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this is the one I just purchased and pulled my springs 130 seat pressure. I found a trick that really makes it easier. The pin and e-clip you pull out to change from 3/8 to 7/16 take it out and leave the e-clip off. Screw the shaft on your stud and then slip the compressor tool over the shaft and put the pin in. Trying to screw the whole compressor on the stud is a pain in the a&&..

Mitch


I use this one:
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=SUM-906784&autoview=sku
Works really good, even on my solid roller springs.
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned already or not, but take a socket and put it over the valve stem on the retainer, and give it a smack with a hammer. Otherwise, you may end up bending your new compressor. You need to break the keepers loose first.
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned already or not, but take a socket and put it over the valve stem on the retainer, and give it a smack with a hammer. Otherwise, you may end up bending your new compressor. You need to break the keepers loose first.
A little tap with a brass (non-marring) hammer will work as well.:yes:
 
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