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Discussion Starter #1
I have A-1000 fuel pump filter and 13204 return style regulator with – 10 line. I would like to shoot 150 shot with my nitrous express hitman plus. Can I run just the one fuel pump, what's the best way?
 

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You make no mention of your combo and how much power you have. I run an A2000 on my 582 single carb car and it feeds the carb and my 200 hp plate nitrous system just fine. I have no idea if an A1000 can or not. My pump will supply a gallon of fuel to the carb in 13 seconds if you time it. That would be the type test I would run to decide what you can expect. You do not want to lean out so be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sbc 406 a strong 575 HP with a power glide and trans break, also going to run E85 fuel, not sure what gear is at this point.
 

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An A1000 with a 13204 regulator will easily support your horsepower level and additional nitrous use on E85. The easiest way to plumb the fuel solenoid in your particular application would be to install a "T" fitting in the fuel regulator gauge port and route a 6AN hose to the fuel solenoid inlet.

If you want to be able to individually tune fuel pressure to the carb and to the fuel solenoid then you will have to install a "Y" fitting in the fuel pressure line, a second return-style fuel pressure regulator, and another return line to the fuel tank. This regulator could then be plumbed only to the solenoid in order to allow additional tuning of the nitrous system.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks, I'm a little concerned about putting the T on the carburetor side of the regulator to go to the nitrous if I'm understanding you correctly.
 

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I was referring to installing a fitting in the gauge port of the regulator. You actually could "T" off one of the carb fittings as well. You have to use regulated pressure to the fuel solenoid. Your pump provides sufficient pressure and volume that you will have no issues with fuel pressure drop or volume when the fuel solenoid opens.
 

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The pretty blue flash will only work once. :popcorn:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks Pete 63, I hadn't thought about running off the gauge port. Won't there be quite a bit of fluctuation in the reading of the pressure gauge and will that be enough fuel for the nitrous express?
 

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thanks Pete 63, I hadn't thought about running off the gauge port. Won't there be quite a bit of fluctuation in the reading of the pressure gauge and will that be enough fuel for the nitrous express?
The A1000 is a high-pressure fuel pump. You may observe a very, very minor and momentary drop in fuel pressure when the fuel solenoid first opens, but the drop should be less than 1-PSI, and will recover in about 1 - 2 tenths of a second.

The restriction in the system is the fuel jet. The orifice in the gauge port is much larger than the orifice in your fuel jet, so restriction to fuel flow is not going to be a concern.

Another alternative would be to remove the 13204 regulator and install a 13202 regulator. The 13202 features an inlet, return, (4) outlet ports, and a gauge port. You're accomplishing the same thing any which way you plumb the solenoid.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I will be doing mostly bracket racing what do you think the fuel pressure drop will affect my consistency on time if I use the regulator I have or would it be better in my case to go ahead and spend the money for the 13202 regulator
 

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As long as the pump and regulator are functioning correctly the pressure drop is so insignificant and recovers so quickly that is has zero impact on performance or consistency.
 

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The A1000 is a high-pressure fuel pump. You may observe a very, very minor and momentary drop in fuel pressure when the fuel solenoid first opens, but the drop should be less than 1-PSI, and will recover in about 1 - 2 tenths of a second.

The restriction in the system is the fuel jet. The orifice in the gauge port is much larger than the orifice in your fuel jet, so restriction to fuel flow is not going to be a concern.

Another alternative would be to remove the 13204 regulator and install a 13202 regulator. The 13202 features an inlet, return, (4) outlet ports, and a gauge port. You're accomplishing the same thing any which way you plumb the solenoid.
That's what I said! :D
 

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thanks for the information I think I'll give it a try. Do you race?
Been about a year since I've been down a drag strip, and now ours are getting shut down.:( I've ran through enough bottles to get a fairly decent handle on the basics of nitrous operating theory and tuning. I've ran a variety of systems on a variety of engines and have been very fortunate to have not hurt any parts due to nitrous use. I'm certainly no expert, and learn something new all the time.
 

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I breezed right past your original post...:rolleyes: Guess I was little repetitive.:D
You should have a separate regulator for the juice to accurately control fuel pressure, before I had mine dialed in...it was running crazy fat and I couldn't control it correctly. I think you will find most cars are running lower fuel pressure to the nitrous then the carb or carbs. I would recommend flowing 5.5 psi to start and tune from there. FYI, I run 4.5 flowing on my NOS big shot system with staggered jetting!
 
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