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Discussion Starter #1
How are you guys dealing with welding and the lead paint? I've been using a respirator with I believe p100 filters. However my 1 car garage even with the regular door and garage door open I'm still feeling sick after maybe 1/2 hour of welding (metal fume fever??). The garage also has a small window that I keep open and I have a wall fan on to try an push the fumes outside.

I've been getting this sickness for a little while now and if I can't stop it, instead of messing with my health I might have to get out of the hobby altogether, which would kill me! Since its not galvanized metal or stainless, I'm assuming its from the lead or maybe just mild steel fumes? I also just dug out an extra bathroom ventilation fan I had buried in my basement that I might try and rig up to pull the fumes out (doing floors now which is really killing me with fumes).

How are you guys dealing with the fumes or prepping the lead painted surfaces for cutting and welding?

If I have to sell the car in its current shape I would lose my ***** and probably get like $500 for it. But if I can't shake this, I gotta do what I gotta do.
 

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I have never had an issue. I don't use the 3M welding fume masks very often like I should. Each person can have a different reaction to fumes or chemicals.
If you are getting sick, you need to stop until the problem is solved. Is it the same feeling everytime?
Try a low speed fan blowing indirectly in the area you are welding, not at the weld or it will blow the shielding gas. Sucking fumes out a window with a fan and large doors open doesn't work very well, unless the fan is big.
Not all respirators are the same, a paint one may not filter welding fumes.
Try one of these:
http://store.cyberweld.com/3mwereaswiod.html?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&cvsfa=2530&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=336d77657265617377696f64&gclid=CK_3wuDa9bgCFek7MgodsRsAog

Check the MSDS for the welding wire for anything that your have a known allergy to, a different wire may help. Get the paint back a little further before you weld to minimize burning.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A small fan blowing over the weld isn't a problem since I'm using flux core instead of a shielding gas. The respirator has worked in the past and a lot of welders it seems use the p100. My respirator is rated for fumes too, which I had to get certified in using at a previous job.

I only get the feeling if I'm welding inside the car for prolonged periods of time. Usually 1/2 hour or more. It doesn't last as long as a typical metal fume flu though I guess. A few hours instead of days. It used to not happen but in recent years its more and more. I'll do some more research and try and build a better ventilation system. Thanks for the info.
 

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You might try putting a CO detector in the car with you. Might be carbon monoxide poisoning. I wonder if the fluxcore puts off some type of fume.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's a good idea. I'll bring my carbon monoxide detector out next time I weld. I might also try and find a smaller window fan that fits the tiny window in my garage to help bring in fresh air.

Sucks because cars are my passion and I can't afford one of these with a nice body that just needs mechanical work.
 

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Flux is probably part of the problem, I still use it for everything but like you had problems with the smoke.

I fixed it with 2 giant Dayton fans from Grainger. I have one that blows towards the back wall of the garage at an angle, and one that blows towards the door. It cycles the smoke out as fast as I can make it. (2 car garage)


If all else fails... just do your welding outside the garage. :)
 

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Ditch the flux cored, shouldn't be used on the body anyway.
X2 on that. Fluxcored burns too hot and a lot more fumes than GMAW aka mig welding. Its harder to make small spot welds that are needed with thin sheet metal. You should be welding on clean prepped metal to avoid burning paint.
You can still have a small breeze with mig just turn up the gas a little. Using the correct respirator filters is key. keep your head out of the fumes. There are some body parts that are are galvanized like under the doors.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the suggestions everyone. Still feeling sick since yesterday morning, but not as bad. This is the longest it's ever bothered me.

I wish I could ditch the flux core but I'm pretty broke and this hobby isn't exactly nice on the wallet already! But, I've always wanted a nice mig anyway so it should be on the long list of wants. I've been using flux core for probably 10 years now so I can weld many different thicknesses with it. Is it ideal, nope. But for floors where it doesn't have to be perfect (for me at least), I feel it does alright. Well, except for the whole killing me part :rolleyes:

I wish I could also just roll it outside to do it as I'm fine welding out there. However my garage is at the bottom of a very steep driveway and I cand roll it up by hand and the cars not running currently. Not to mention its up on stands to keep the frame straight while doing the floors.

As far as respirator filters I saw that welders prefer p100. Not sure if its the best one though? Paint is off the welding surfaces, but maybe only 1/4-1/2" away from the edge. I will go further back from now on. Like say 6" or so to be safe. Thanks for the heads up on the galvanized under the doors. Exactly what area? The part that the factory floor was spot welded to? If that's the case, ding ding ding, we have a winner as I was under the car plug welding my floor to there.

I'm going to wait until I'm feeling better and grab some better fans and keep my face out of the smoke as much as possible.
 

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Forgot to add, If you truly feel that you've been exposed to lead in this way you should go to the hospital and get checked. Especially with lingering symptoms.

High levels of lead in the system can do some serious damage, not something to shrug off. :yes:
 
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