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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Tubbing/Backhalving my '72

Well, now that I know for sure that my motor needs bigger tires to be able to keep it on the ground and out of the way of telephone poles and other car-destroying objects (ask me how I know), I think my next Nova will need to be backhalved and tubbed. Here is the catch though: I have never welded before. Now, I know you're probably going to recommend a 'professional' do it for me, but that would be pointless and give me zero satisfaction. So I come for help. The good lord saved my 383 that I built from the ground up, and I can't be anything more but thankful for a second chance.

I have my eyes on a '72, and will be getting her in the next few weeks. I don't have any welding equipment, nor any experience, as I have already mentioned, and this wouldn't be happening right away either, but would be a bigger priority than it was before. The car is real straight, no rust whatsoever (that I can see anyways). My voltage is limited to a 110v socket in my little apartment garage/shack.

1) What 'kind' of welder would I need to purchase in order to be able to handle doing all that is required to backhalf a car (my '72)? (sheetmetal, rollcage, etc) I imagine there will need to be more voltage, but that isn't an option unless I run an incredibly long extension cord from my dryer all the way out to my shack..err, garage.

2) Any other tools I would need?

3) I'm sure there are plenty of options for backhalf kits for 3rd gens. What has worked for you? What will be best suited for a novice like me?

Thanks for any help.
 

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I would invest in running 220/240v 50 amp service to your work space, otherwise you will not be able to run a welder that will get you the necessary penetration needed for welding the steel structure. You'll need to get that addressed before moving onto anything else.
 

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I would invest in running 220/240v 50 amp service to your work space, otherwise you will not be able to run a welder that will get you the necessary penetration needed for welding the steel structure. You'll need to get that addressed before moving onto anything else.
X2 on that Vin63, plus this is not a project to learn how to weld on. Start reading everything you can on rear clip frames and take a welding class or you may end up leaving your rear clip behind the first time you let it go.:eek::D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't think I'd be able to get that kind of voltage out to my 'garage' (I use that term loosely since it is more like a storage anyways) Although I don't know for sure how much voltage is in the garage, I know I have a dual-socket .. socket. I'm willing to bet it's a split 110 off the same line, but I can ask.

In the event that it is just a 110v, what are my other options as far as 110v welders go? I've read from a couple sources that 110v welders can do what I am trying to do.

Thanks.
 

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...I've read from a couple sources that 110v welders can do what I am trying to do.
No...and I TIG weld all of my cages, frames, etc. Pay to have a professional install the frame and roll bar/cage. There is no shame or loss of pride in that compared to injuring yourself or someone else because of poor construciton of your car.
 
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