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Discussion Starter #1
I have been running Footbrake for years but might give heads up a try this year. My trans has a transbrake valve body (bracket brake) but I have never used it. It does not have a transbrake solenoid, so I have bought one for it. Other than installing the solenoid and wiring it up, is there anything trans related (internal) that I need to do or check?

Thanks in advance!

BTW, it is a powerglide transmission.
 

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Yes make sure the converter has anti-balloon plates in it. Might want to install a kevlar band as well. Also install a 2 step, it will allow you to adjust your launch RPM, plus they sound cool when you're on them. :D
took the words right out of my mouth. One other question, your current converter...............what stahl do you have it set for?
 

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Get yourself an adjustible trans-brake button for that little extra advantage. :devil:
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have a 10" PTC convertor rated around 4000. (I leave around 2800 on the footbrake. Curious to see what it will go on the brake.

Forgot to mention I have a two step that I will also be installing (as you all suggested).

Will need all the advantage I can get going against guys with 4/10ths brakes.. Not to mention I'll be new at it. Really just want to 'join the party'. Hoping to run the 7.0 class (1/8th of course).

Thanks guys!
 

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Are you 100% sure that you have a transbrake valve body installed in your Powerglide? Many (not all) Powerglide transbrake valve bodies require the transbrake to be activated in order to have reverse gear. If you have reverse gear with no transbrake activation then there is always the possibility that your transmission is simply equipped with a normal full manual valve body.

If your transmission is indeed equipped with a transbrake valve body then you need to make sure that the brake valve and spring is installed. This is the valve that the solenoid pushes against when activated.

Do you know any details about how your Powerglide is built internally? A transbrake-equipped Powerglide should be equipped with a bare minimum of a quality aftermarket input shaft, billet high gear clutch hub, and 5 or more premium high gear frictions. A 1.76 gear set is preferable over a 1.82 as the carrier for the 1.76 gear set is significantly stronger, and will provide dramatically improved durability. As power levels increase more aftermarket upgraded internal components become necessary. A 1.76 'glide built as described will typically withstand 600 - 750 flywheel horsepower for a very long time.

As a side note, an original GM Powerglide band in good condition is the best band you can ever put in a high performance Powerglide. Aftermarket standard width Kevlar and high static bands are also great choices and will offer outstanding durability and performance, but an original GM band is still the best. When using a Kevlar band you only want to run the one with white lettering on the friction material. There are some generic Kevlar bands out there that feature the green lining, but with no lettering on them. These are inferior quality bands and will not typically last long. We have ran over 3,600 flywheel horsepower at 3,250 pounds on a stock GM Powerglide band without any issues. The "wide" bands that are out there in the aftermarket are a total waste of money... they offer zero additional holding ability on the drum.
 

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:eek:
Many (not all) Powerglide transbrake valve bodies require the transbrake to be activated in order to have reverse gear. .
When it comes to my personal experience only Pro Tree trans brakes required the trans brake to be active. But I could be wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Yes, it has a brake valve body. It is a TCI unit. This was confirmed by a friend when he built this trans for me. I had purchased it from another individual and had him go through it.

As mentioned, it is a 'bracket' brake or 5/10ths unit, not a 'pro' brake that requires being engaged to back up.

I am going to go ahead and give my buddy/builder a call to be sure there is nothing else I may need.

I appreciate all the insight!
 

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Don't worry about pro brake or standard brake. Your car will be a bigger influence on how it leaves. You will have a bigger influence on the car with smaller front tires, bumping in deeper, and suspension travel than any pro brake would in your car. Pro brakes are for tube chassis cars that are optimized and there is nowhere else to gain reaction time.
 

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We (Hughes) deal with dozens of Powerglides per week, and repair/modify many competitors units. 80 - 90% of the Powerglide transbrakes out there require the transbrake to be activated for reverse regardless of who manufactured the brake and regardless of whether it's a Pro or bracket brake. We've had literally every brand of Powerglide transbrake through our facility at one point or another.

Our Pro brake and our bracket brake both require the brake to be activated for reverse. We offer a "no-button" brake also, but it's only available as a special order item in our Pro Series model. Not trying to be argumentative here... just sharing what I've seen is all.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's funny/odd that you say that. Of the 5 or so previous cars I've owned/driven that did have brakes, only one required you to activate the solenoid to back up.

I do appreciate your input though!
 

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It's funny/odd that you say that. Of the 5 or so previous cars I've owned/driven that did have brakes, only one required you to activate the solenoid to back up.

I do appreciate your input though!
Go figure!:D:D Guess I should change my statement to "80 - 90% of the transbrakes that I've seen..."
 
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