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I am thinking of getting my car acid dipped. We have a local hot rod shop that does dipping. In my head it will get into all of the spots media blasting or sanding can't. But, thats in my head:awkward:
 

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I think it really depends. First off, do you have any idea what kind of shape the car is in. Do you suspect lots of issues or is it pretty solid? Are you prepared for what you will uncover. Is there bondo, and if so, how much and is done well, or crappy?

I think if you are prepared for the worse and fully intend on being ready to replace panels etc and want it done totally right, so you know everything there is to know that could be hidden by paint/bondo, then yes. If you are "happy" with the body work that exists and are looking to repaint then maybe not.

Without pictures it's hard to offer an opinion.

Mike
 

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72 Frame off, bare metal resto-mod. 383, TH350, Eaton Posi, Complete new suspension, disk brakes
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Cost is always a factor and in my experience, it would have been less expensive to go to a good blaster. Less of a mess in the shop too. I'm still cleaning dust up from all the grinding, and it got everywhere in the car too, so clean up the media or clean up the grinding dust. The next one will be deconstructed then blasted.
 

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to media blast or not

back in the day the racers and some mfg's used to acid dip their bodies for weight reduction. you didn't dare lean on those cars. acid dip=chemical milling .Go for something less aggressive.
 

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I had my Buick blasted, after the metal work was done. Once it was blasted, I had the bodywork done. My buddy owns a restoration shop and says it is much more cost effective to have it blasted over stripping it by hand with a DA and grinders. I will have my Nova blasted once I'm done with the metal work. I am not worried about ending up with more holes in the car. If I find more metal that needs to be replaced, I'll replace it.
 

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I am thinking of getting my car acid dipped. We have a local hot rod shop that does dipping. In my head it will get into all of the spots media blasting or sanding can't. But, thats in my head:awkward:
Keep in mind that the liquid stripper will get in all the places that the new paint will not. There is going to be a lot of hidden exposed metal as many places are inaccessible and impractical to paint...not to mention the possibility of seams retaining some of the stripper only to seep out later once the car is completed. Personally, I would never have a body dipped. My .02 :)
 

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Should I media blast my 62 or not ??
Thanks ,

Tony

Question is: What speaks against blast/dip?
If there is rust you will remove it. If you don't blast/dip you miss rust for sure.
I personally grind the paint down on every accessible panel and leave the rest to the blaster. Floors, trunk, pillars, and so on. You save some money and there is less chance of warped body panels.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Question is: What speaks against blast/dip?
If there is rust you will remove it. If you don't blast/dip you miss rust for sure.
I personally grind the paint down on every accessible panel and leave the rest to the blaster. Floors, trunk, pillars, and so on. You save some money and there is less chance of warped body panels.

Thats what I was thinking about doing . I know I need to replace the whole floor pan , both lower quarters behind the rear wheels , and a few small patches here and there. I do not know however what the rest looks like , its in primer .


Tony
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had my Buick blasted, after the metal work was done. Once it was blasted, I had the bodywork done. My buddy owns a restoration shop and says it is much more cost effective to have it blasted over stripping it by hand with a DA and grinders. I will have my Nova blasted once I'm done with the metal work. I am not worried about ending up with more holes in the car. If I find more metal that needs to be replaced, I'll replace it.

Tom , I have to replace the whole floor pan and up the toe board a little . Do you recommend doing that metal work 1st and then have it blasted ?

Tony
 

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Ideally you blast first then do welding then prime. I don't have that luxury, I will blast, prime then grind areas clean that need welding.
 

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I had my Nova walnut shell blasted. It did a great job allowing you to start out with a fresh start. I wouldn't think twice about having it done again. Whatever you use, make sure you get something on it such as DP40 right away as rust sets in almost immediately.
 

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I think it really depends. First off, do you have any idea what kind of shape the car is in. Do you suspect lots of issues or is it pretty solid? Are you prepared for what you will uncover. Is there bondo, and if so, how much and is done well, or crappy?

I think if you are prepared for the worse and fully intend on being ready to replace panels etc and want it done totally right, so you know everything there is to know that could be hidden by paint/bondo, then yes. If you are "happy" with the body work that exists and are looking to repaint then maybe not.

Without pictures it's hard to offer an opinion.

Mike
I could'nt have said it any better.

Many that have ther bodies media blasted are devatsated by what they uncover.
 

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Tom , I have to replace the whole floor pan and up the toe board a little . Do you recommend doing that metal work 1st and then have it blasted ?

Tony
I would cut the floors out before blasting. So the inner part of the reinforce bars are blasted too and you get a much cleaner surface for welding. The more rust is removed the better will be your welds.

@ Wagonman, sure that happens more often that the other way, but would you like to leave these bondo covered rust on a restoration? Probably not if you spend a lot of money in parts, motor, paint, tires and end with an rust bucket after a year or so. It depends a lot where you're living too. Here in Germany it's like living in the Rust Belt with lots of salt in the winter and sometimes much rain during summer. It often happens that cars, driven for years with bondo repairs, were imported and after two or so years they are complete rust buckets.
 

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Tom , I have to replace the whole floor pan and up the toe board a little . Do you recommend doing that metal work 1st and then have it blasted ?

Tony
That's how we did it on my buick. All the major metal work was done first, then I had it blasted. I'll do the nova the same way. I'm working through the metal work on the nova now.
 

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Do a little reading on the various types of material for blasting as each has it's own characteristics and each is used for different situations and outcomes.

In general terms:
1. Soda typically removes one layer of paint at a time however isn't abrasive enough to get rust, some body fillers, & other material off the base.

2. Walnut shell will remove multiple layers of paint, rust etc. without hurting the base metal. (IMO the best to use if you are starting from scratch and want to know what you really have to start with)

3. Sand is course and typically used to remove everything off the metal but can also damage sheetmetal for instance, so used for cleaning up chassis parts, etc. IMO should never be used for removing paint off auto body parts.

4. Glass bead material is used on metal, plastic, rubber etc. to end up with a uniform or shiny finish. It's typically used for removing scratches & other imperfections, etc.
 

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I did a combination of sand and soda blasting and sanding. I removed the quarters and everything else, sandblated the inner quarters , rockers(EXTERIOR). cowl sides, dash, etc. I used soda on all the large sheetmetal areas such as the roof, cowl upper panel, sail panels, etc. I d.a. sanded the doors, fenders, and new hood, quarters, and trunklid. The media, both sand and soda get everywhere and have to be completly removed. The soda can be caustic if left inside panels so make sure your blaster blows the car down for a good half hour and then machine sand the entire vehicle and prime asap. One last note was the most difficult area which was the inner roof panel which is covered in a tar like material that I had to remove with gasoline. Use caution when you do this, protect your lungs.





Looks like it worked

 
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