Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Will a larger front tire create a push in a car as compared to a smaller diameter tire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
No, not in and of itself. However, a tire with a taller sidewall will not handle as well as one with a smaller aspect ratio. For example, you're better off handling-wise running a 26" tall tire on a 17" wheel than you would be running a 26" tall tire on a 14" wheel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,365 Posts
Neutral handling balance can be very difficult to achieve. The rule of thumb is to get as much grip in the front as possible, then get the rear to follow. A larger, grippier front tire will cause an overstear situation, not a push or understeer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,106 Posts
No, not in and of itself. However, a tire with a taller sidewall will not handle as well as one with a smaller aspect ratio. For example, you're better off handling-wise running a 26" tall tire on a 17" wheel than you would be running a 26" tall tire on a 14" wheel.
That's kind of subjective though. The drivers likes have alot to do with it. Yes, with a shorter aspect ratio the car will react quicker since there is less sidewall to felx, but you loose a little road feel. A taller sidewall will squirm when pushing the car, but you can learn to read this. Once you know why your car does, you can use that feeling to know where the limit is. With a taller sidewall, once you start to feel you/ve reached that limit, you can back off a little. With a short sidewall with no give, once you feel that limit, it's usually too late and you've lost the car. It's like anything else, a fine balancing act depending on driver comfort and ability.

As far as creating a pushing situation, that's created by the suspension set up. With cars like ours with rear leaf springs, a rear sway bar alot of times creates a push. Once you upgrade to stiffer springs front and rear and a nice front bar, usually the rear bar becomes unnecessary. Alot of guys will install them, find out they have too much understeer, and remove the bar for better handling. All the tire does is create a contact patch with the ground, but a really good biting tire may amplify the understeer the car has in it. This is a really simplified explanation, but hope it helps. It's just like an engine, it all has to work together in a good combination.

Does your car have a bad push? Or are you looking to fix an oversteer condition?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Does your car have a bad push? Or are you looking to fix an oversteer condition?
I was just chatting with Jr about it, and I thought it would make sense a smaller diameter tire would be more responsive then a taller tire. I'm aware the lower profile works better, but takes the feel away (I learned this the hard way in my younger day!:rolleyes:) My car would have a push mostly because of the BB and set up for the straight line racing. It was more of a, how come question, for knowledge.

Thanks for the input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,361 Posts
That's kind of subjective though. The drivers likes have alot to do with it. Yes, with a shorter aspect ratio the car will react quicker since there is less sidewall to felx, but you loose a little road feel. A taller sidewall will squirm when pushing the car, but you can learn to read this. Once you know why your car does, you can use that feeling to know where the limit is. With a taller sidewall, once you start to feel you/ve reached that limit, you can back off a little. With a short sidewall with no give, once you feel that limit, it's usually too late and you've lost the car. It's like anything else, a fine balancing act depending on driver comfort and ability.

As far as creating a pushing situation, that's created by the suspension set up. With cars like ours with rear leaf springs, a rear sway bar alot of times creates a push. Once you upgrade to stiffer springs front and rear and a nice front bar, usually the rear bar becomes unnecessary. Alot of guys will install them, find out they have too much understeer, and remove the bar for better handling. All the tire does is create a contact patch with the ground, but a really good biting tire may amplify the understeer the car has in it. This is a really simplified explanation, but hope it helps. It's just like an engine, it all has to work together in a good combination.

Does your car have a bad push? Or are you looking to fix an oversteer condition?
A shorter sidewall will INCREASE road feel. The object of the shorter/ stiffer sidewall is to mantain the proper tread contact to the road under cornering loads.

An addition of a rear sway bar will almost always cause an OVERSTEER situation, not understeer.

To answer the original question...
If you increase traction on the front the car balance will move toward oversteer. If you increase traction in the rear the car balance will move toward understeer. Tire size is a factor, but it ultimately comes down to traction as you cant treat all tires the same.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,365 Posts
A shorter sidewall will INCREASE road feel. The object of the shorter/ stiffer sidewall is to mantain the proper tread contact to the road under cornering loads.

An addition of a rear sway bar will almost always cause an OVERSTEER situation, not understeer.

To answer the original question...
If you increase traction on the front the car balance will move toward oversteer. If you increase traction in the rear the car balance will move toward understeer. Tire size is a factor, but it ultimately comes down to traction as you cant treat all tires the same.
Nogo is correct. You usually need a lot of tire in the back to need a rear sway bar; otherwise, you will oversteer. Manufactures manufactures build understeer or push into their suspension because it is easier for a panicky driver to correct. It is not the optimal for performance, but few people are capable of truely driving a performance car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
. It is not the optimal for performance, but few people are capable of truely driving a performance car.
Aint that the truth!!!!:yes::yes:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top