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Discussion Starter #1
So I've decided to lock my timing out. How do I set the timing now. With the motor running, do I use a dial back light and set the dial to 36* and set the
"0" mark on the damper to TDC on the damper, or do I use the degree numbers that are on the damper with the timing light set a zero. I'm kind of confused as to how this works. Thanks
 

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Using the marks on your harmonic balancer are more accurate if you have took the time to set the pointer to true TDC during engine assembly. Generally, dial-back timing lights are not as accurate and are basically for engines that do not have the nice degreed balancer. I never use them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help guys.

It's unbelievable how good the thing runs now. I just cant believe the throttle response. and how smooth it runs. Why I never did this years ago is beyond me. With out having changed anything else, it's like night and day.:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

Finely some good results.



PS Can you tell I'm happy??????LOL
 

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I have heard people locking out there timing at a certain degree. How do you go about this? Do you remove the advance weights and springs from under the rotor button and use like safety wire and wire it up in the fully advanced position? Do you have any problems starting it when it gets up to operating temp?
 

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I have been running my dist locked out for a couple of years now with no issues. I have an msd dist and just bought their lock out kit for like $15.00 and then set the timing. No hard starting issues at all and I run mine locked out at 40*!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have heard people locking out there timing at a certain degree. How do you go about this? Do you remove the advance weights and springs from under the rotor button and use like safety wire and wire it up in the fully advanced position? Do you have any problems starting it when it gets up to operating temp?
I'm a noob at thia as well, but I have an MSD dist. that has provisions for locking the timing. Yes you do remove all the weights and springs and lock it some how so the advance mechanism cant move at all. I dont think it matters where you lock it, as long as it can't move. Then just set your total timing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I just got back from a drive and holy crap is it responsive and I only have the timing set at 35*. You mash the pedal and there's no waiting around, no stumbling(wich is something I just thought I had to live with) I'm so happy right now. I cant wait to take it to the track and use the T-brake, tried it a little on the street:devil:, that's going to be fun.
 

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here is how I locked mine out. took a couple of tries and about 10 minutes but it works well. I could have jbwelded everything together even quicker but I wanted something that I could easily undo if I so chose.

notice I used two plates to make sure there would be absolutely no movement.



I liked locked out timing to be honest. when you build an engine, messing with centrifugal advance and vacuum advance on top of everything else is a lot, plus it has been said that they introduce a lot of error in timing. something one does not need at high rpm. right now Im tuning my efi and moving advance is something that would get in the way bigtime when one is trying to tune. I cant even imagine trying to tune with a distributor that has mechanical and vaccum advance.

next of course is a new hei8 that will allow to program the timing with a few clicks of the mouse :D
 

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Cyan, how do you like that MSD module? Any good? I've read that it has a traction control sensor build in???
I hate it. the first one died on me after less than 200 miles on it, and Im fully expecting this one to die soon as well. it does not have a good reputation and it did absolutely nothing over the stock hei module.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
here is how I locked mine out. took a couple of tries and about 10 minutes but it works well. I could have jbwelded everything together even quicker but I wanted something that I could easily undo if I so chose.

notice I used two plates to make sure there would be absolutely no movement.



I liked locked out timing to be honest. when you build an engine, messing with centrifugal advance and vacuum advance on top of everything else is a lot, plus it has been said that they introduce a lot of error in timing. something one does not need at high rpm. right now Im tuning my efi and moving advance is something that would get in the way bigtime when one is trying to tune. I cant even imagine trying to tune with a distributor that has mechanical and vaccum advance.

next of course is a new hei8 that will allow to program the timing with a few clicks of the mouse :D
I agree completly. If I wouldn't have been so scare to try it, I would have done it a long time ago. I don't know if locking the timing ads more power, but it sure feels like it. I'm almost temted to put the dual carb top back on the tunnel ram. With as easy as it is to tune the carb with the timing locked, it might be worth a shot????:turn:
 

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here is how I locked mine out. took a couple of tries and about 10 minutes but it works well. I could have jbwelded everything together even quicker but I wanted something that I could easily undo if I so chose.

notice I used two plates to make sure there would be absolutely no movement.



I liked locked out timing to be honest. when you build an engine, messing with centrifugal advance and vacuum advance on top of everything else is a lot, plus it has been said that they introduce a lot of error in timing. something one does not need at high rpm. right now Im tuning my efi and moving advance is something that would get in the way bigtime when one is trying to tune. I cant even imagine trying to tune with a distributor that has mechanical and vaccum advance.

next of course is a new hei8 that will allow to program the timing with a few clicks of the mouse :D
I hate it. the first one died on me after less than 200 miles on it, and Im fully expecting this one to die soon as well. it does not have a good reputation and it did absolutely nothing over the stock hei module.
that's good to know. I thought about converting to the MSD set up but if its not doing anything over a good module and a good coil why bother?

I like the way you did the lock out on your HEI. On the MSD you can knock the pin out of the dist gear and rotate the shaft so the advance bushing is removed and that pin is put into a hole so it can't move. I've ran a few cars locked out, especially when spraying N20. My 64 had a crank trigger and locked out timing at 38*
 

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What's the reason for locking them out?
 

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What's the reason for locking them out?
They usually lock them out on race cars since they have a high idle and spend very little time at low rpm. That way they don't have to mess with mechanical advance or worry about weights or springs breaking. On a street car, it can help off idle response but can cause detonation if its to much advance for the motor at low rpm. With a high stall rpm you probably wouldn't experience any detonation because the motor wont have a load on it until full advance either way.

-Dan
 

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I think it's a bad idea all around, there would be no difference in that compared to really light springs. What you're doing with this is also cranking at full advance, does you motor crank and instantly run at 3000 RPM typically where full advance is needed. No, so why do it? I will agree that full out race engines it might be a benefit but don't be poser, do it right.

If you spend any time on the street under 3000 RPM and it's hard for me to belive that most don't, set up your dizzy correctly.

I run mechanical and vacuum plus even still have the charcol canister hooked up. I have more off idle throttle response than I know what to do with. Locking out my dizzy would be total waste of gas and maybe my motor.
 

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Don't understand why you would want locked out dist on the street. I race twice a month and use a quick mech advance, but what really helps on the street and driving to the track is Vacuum advance. It idles at fairly high vacuum, so I am extremely clean at idle and very responsive...even more so that a locked 36. And, on the interstate, I am running 80mph at light throttle, full vacuum advance for a total of 52 degrees = this means much better gas mileage and, for me especially down here in hotsville, a much cooler engine around town and on the trips to and from the track. With no vacuum (full throttle) I am at 36 degrees....i.e. all the way down the track after a very responsive idle and kick off the line. Full race cars don't really need any of this for cooling, etc....so lock em out where you want em and if they are hard to start, us a switch that turns on the ignition after you have the starter spinning the motor (always ran that way in Super Gas)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think it's a bad idea all around, there would be no difference in that compared to really light springs. What you're doing with this is also cranking at full advance, does you motor crank and instantly run at 3000 RPM typically where full advance is needed. No, so why do it? I will agree that full out race engines it might be a benefit but don't be poser, do it right.

If you spend any time on the street under 3000 RPM and it's hard for me to belive that most don't, set up your dizzy correctly.

I run mechanical and vacuum plus even still have the charcol canister hooked up. I have more off idle throttle response than I know what to do with. Locking out my dizzy would be total waste of gas and maybe my motor.
Don't understand why you would want locked out dist on the street. I race twice a month and use a quick mech advance, but what really helps on the street and driving to the track is Vacuum advance. It idles at fairly high vacuum, so I am extremely clean at idle and very responsive...even more so that a locked 36. And, on the interstate, I am running 80mph at light throttle, full vacuum advance for a total of 52 degrees = this means much better gas mileage and, for me especially down here in hotsville, a much cooler engine around town and on the trips to and from the track. With no vacuum (full throttle) I am at 36 degrees....i.e. all the way down the track after a very responsive idle and kick off the line. Full race cars don't really need any of this for cooling, etc....so lock em out where you want em and if they are hard to start, us a switch that turns on the ignition after you have the starter spinning the motor (always ran that way in Super Gas)

I always thought that to, but my car runs like it's never run before. As far as driving on the street with the timing locked out, again, I say, never has my car run so good. When I mash the pedal it fries the tires at pretty much any cruising speed and I'm running MT ET Drags. I’m not trying to change your opinion on the subject, rather letting you know how it does work well for some.
 

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vacuum cans and mechanical advance introduce timing errors into the system.

if it runs best at 38 degrees and you mash it and only get 36 degrees now, or 37 degrees, or 39 degrees, you could be losing power. Ive seen people claim to lose 50ft lbs of torque moving by changing total timing by 2 degrees so it very well could cause a loss of performance.
 
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