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I have a 3rd Gen Nova that I am finally starting work on. It's a solid southern car and I drove the car as it was for the last 2 summers. This year I intend to freshen up the driveline and suspension and give it a paint job.

I have a set of Herb Adams swaybars to use on the car. Anybody have any experience with them?
 

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I haven't used them but Herb Adams has an excellent reputation. He was the mastermind behind the more impressive Pontiac Trans Am suspensions. He had an impressive (and well documented) career with GM before striking out on his own.

Pontiac's contract engineer Herb Adams was responsible for the research and development that invented the original WS6 suspension package. First released on the 1978 Trans Am as an option, T/A handling was in a league of it's own in '78 & '79. Herb was contracted by Pontiac in '77 to build eight specialty Trans Am's that were modified production units to show the ease in which the T/A's could be converted into full-fledge race cars to replace the '77 IROC race series Camaro's. From this R&D the production WS6 option was born. Adam's formed his own company - Herb Adams (VSE) Very Special Equipment, Pebble Beach, CA;
Moroso is the current distributor for Herb Adams products. It is also interesting to note that he literally wrote the book on Chassis Engineering.
http://www.racerpartswholesale.com/book2.htm

Best known as a father of the Pontiac Trans-Am and the division's Super Duty V8, Herb Adams has a fondness for racing. While at Pontiac, he and his engineering team wanted to go racing, but knew their bosses would never stand for–or fund–an effort built around Pontiac's pony car. Undaunted, legend has it that they took Mrs. Adams' 80,000-mile 1964 Pontiac Tempest, de-stroked the 389-in.3 motor, and brought the car up to race spec. It was entered in the opening round of the Sports Car Club of America's 1971 Trans-Am championship to howls of laughter from better funded competitors with newer vehicles. Unable to qualify, the car was allowed to start from the back of the pack, whereupon it moved through the field, and was running second behind eventual winner Mark Donohue's factory-supported Penske Racing AMC Javelin when the engine quit. The publicity that followed the unfunded, after-hours racers was enormous, as were the repercussions. In short order, and reportedly with some "help" from Roger Penske, the project was shut down by Pontiac's chief engineer.
 
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