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I recently read a " storing your vehicle" for the winter months and one recommendation was to start the engine every week or so to keep the moisture out of the cylinders, etc.
I parked my 65 in my attached garage at the end of November. Today it is -19c /-2.6F so I will not be starting the engine today but just wondering what you guys do and if this is a good idea at all..
You warm weather people need not reply:mad::D
 

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I feel that unless you can run the vehicle long enough to get it completely up to temperature and take the moisture out of everything, including the entire exhaust system, that you actually do more harm than good starting it often. If one is worried about moisture in the cylinders I would fog them down before storage. It is the fluctuations in temperature that cause the moisture problems.
 

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my last drive in the nova was dec 13 so yesterday jan 10 i started the 327. i let it run till i couldn't see any exhaust an the temp was at 170. set the park brake an ran thru the gears in the 700r4. i do this once a month an keep a trickle charger on the battery an put 16 oz. of sea foam in a full tank of gas.
 

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I start mine every 3-4 weeks, let it get up to operating temp (until the electric fans come on) , run the trans through the gears. Have been doing that for the past 10 years, no issues.
 

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Leave it sit. Takes a lot of idling to get everything warmed up to temperature and bake all the moisture out. First time you drive it in spring you will burn out any moisture that is in there. I had the firsthand experience of borescoping a bunch of race engines that were in a unheated warehouse that had gone through a bunch of heat cycles. Every engine looked perfect inside
 

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I always hated popping spark plugs out and spraying fogging oil in that way. Easiest method I learned is to take a core bottle of ATF in a tiny hole in the cap dribble a little bit in the carburetor with it running until it starts smoking then shut it off. Of course this method works easiest on carbureted engines

I feel the need to edit my post to warn anyone that does try this method of digging. Be very very careful to much and you could hydrolock the engine
 

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The biggest issue with letting them sit for 4 or so months in my opinion is the ethanol sitting in carbs, tanks, and fuel lines. I run my vehicles to almost empty the last few times I use them in the fall then when almost empty I give each 4 gallons of Sunoco 98 octane non-ethanol and drive them a few miles. The C7 gets left with whatever was in it since it was designed for today's fuel. I have a few battery tenders that get moved around between vehicles, the Vette has the tender that came with it and plugs in the port in the back so I do nothing. I am lucky in they are in my heated shop but I still don't bother running them, unless you can get it out for an actual drive you'll never burn all the water out of the exhaust. Fogging is a pain to deal with and I wouldn't do it to anything but a boat. I've had engines I put together that sat for years before I ran them and they were fine. Obviously checking coolant strength is a no brainer for those of us who live where it gets really cold...like -2...here in NE the last few days, and I know there are guys on this site that would laugh at a few -2 deg days.
 

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Running the engine for short periods can create condensation. As said earlier, it takes a lot of running to burn all of the moisture from the exhaust system and the engine oil. Sometimes a person does more damage running the engine for short periods because ALL of the moisture isn't being burnt off and that moisture can cause corrosion.

I would do as "bruinfan1966" does...just leave them alone until you can get them out for a 10+ mile drive.
 

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My race car sat from October to April without being started every year with no issues. As far as the ethanol gas, I will agree that can be hit or miss. My Chevelle sat for 15 months with the same gas in it, and it was fine. But I do know of cases of ethanol separation. May be possibly due to the area the gas is sold in. My lawnmowers and stuff sit all season with the same gas in them. Leave the tanks full to prevent condensation and so far they have been fine next season.
 

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I also prescribe to the don't start it in the winter theory. I usually change the oil/filter just before winter, then run it until it is thoroughly warm, then you have fresh oil sitting on your bearings all winter. If you do start it, I'd let it run for an hour, especially if it's idling and cold outside. Once it's warm and idling, not a bad idea to turn the idle screws in until rpm drops, then back out just a bit. This insures your not running too rich. Multiple starts without thoroughly warming the engine will bugger up the plugs enough that eventually it just won't start. Also not a bad idea to move it around if it's not on jackstands to avoid flat spots on tires.
 

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I live in central Canada. We do cold! i store summer cars in the winter, and winter vehicles in the summer. Me (and every farmer in the world) store engines for 6-8 months EVERY YEAR! (why do I live here?) here is what you do. #1, shut off the engine. #2 empty fuel from carb. (I pull the fuel lines from the pump and run it till it stalls) #3 fuel stabilizer #4 battery maintainer #5 leave it alone, you have done enough. thats it. don't worry about it any more
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I feel that unless you can run the vehicle long enough to get it completely up to temperature and take the moisture out of everything, including the entire exhaust system, that you actually do more harm than good starting it often. If one is worried about moisture in the cylinders I would fog them down before storage. It is the fluctuations in temperature that cause the moisture problems.
I agree... unless you can let it run long enough to get it up to operating temp for awhile i think you will be hurting more than helping
 
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