Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, so i have a 1971 nova im looking to upgrade to a rack and pinion. So far my research has yielded this. One option is the unisteer which doesn't sound like a good option due to loss of turning angle and too much bump steer. Another option is Flaming River, this is the most expensive option but i have not found any reviews on if it is a good upgrade or not. The 3rd option is speedtech, its middle ground price wise and i was curious if anyone has any input on the upgrade. Does it have bump steer? Do you loose any angle? Any info is much appreciated, please advise thanks

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
How do you plan to use your car? What are your primary goals for the conversion to be deemed a significant improvement..?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I do auto cross so want to get much better response from steering and also looking to improve drive ability. The previous owner had set it up for drag racing. Already put 3.73 ring and pinion in, he had 4.56. The steering box is something like 24:1 so just driving around is annoying
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
Sounds like a major revamping of your front suspension is in order. There are a lot of ways you can go but the main things to keep in mind are simple.. The front suspension steering on these old cars were never designed to corner very well.. The camber and caster are doing all the wrong things when you go to push through a corner.. The attitude of each wheel in relation to the ground is key to getting the car to turn.. These cars did fine as straight line drag cars and a few tweaks and they were even better but none of that works to improve cornering ability.. When Camaro’s and Firebirds were taken into the Trans Am racing series they had to be modified to corner and handle on a road corse and what was done then is just as relevant to you today with your Nova.. All GM A, F, & X bodies suffered the same problems. They GM were purposefully designed the front suspension this way to under steer.. What you need to do to correct this is change the attitude of the front wheels to be more responsive to the steering input you give it.. This can be achieved in a couple of ways. The Guldstrand modification is what the early Trans Am cars got to improve negative camber gain in the front wheels. This modification lowers the upper control arm mounts to make the wheel tilt in at the top when the suspension is loaded when going around a corner at speed.. You can achieve the same effects as the Guldstrand modification by swapping in a taller spindle.. It will behave the same way and you don’t have to do any modifications other then bolt on some new parts.. The taller spindles will require a shorter upper control arm to make the same results as the Guldstrand modification.. I know that Speedway, Heidts, and Fatman all have tall spindles that also have a 2” drop available.. I know that Globalwest has the control arms to make this all work.. ATS makes the tall AFX spindles which will also do the same thing but are made out of aluminum.. Once you get the suspension geometry working properly you can fine tune the ride with springs, shocks, and sway bars. I would also suggest subframe connectors to tie the chassis together better..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
Bumpsteer is not just an annoyance, it is scary and dangerous and very difficult to "engineer-out". The suspension design of these old cars is of completely different architecture than modern cars that have R&P "designed-in".
I put the Uni-steer kit in a '56 and I would not do it again. I would have been better off with a new Borgeson box and fresh rod ends.
That said, all of the people selling R&P kits will tell you their product will not have bumpsteer, tell them you want it in writing and you want 100% of your money back if that turns out to be the case.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top