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Discussion Starter #1
can you run a solid roller on the street or is it too much....you know ...starting and stopping..also waht adout making vacuum....and what size would be good for the street??
 

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you can run a solid roller but it will make a lot of noise compared to a hyd. roller, for a street car that will see everyday use i would stick with a hydralic cam, wether it be a roller or not...

as far as size, it depends greatly on your intended use and motor size, give me more info....

jon
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you can run a solid roller but it will make a lot of noise compared to a hyd. roller, for a street car that will see everyday use i would stick with a hydralic cam, wether it be a roller or not...

as far as size, it depends greatly on your intended use and motor size, give me more info....

jon
it will be an everyday driver....maybe see an 1/8 mile race every now and then. probably a 350 with a 350 turbo. something that sounds really good.i had a 350 in a chevelle with a comp.cam 280 dur.480 lift. it sounded good.thanks for he time!!!!
 

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it will be an everyday driver....maybe see an 1/8 mile race every now and then. probably a 350 with a 350 turbo. something that sounds really good.i had a 350 in a chevelle with a comp.cam 280 dur.480 lift. it sounded good.thanks for he time!!!!
that comp cam 280-480 is the largest i would consider for EVERYDAY driving .
 

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well from the sounds of it you should just stick with a hydralic cam, low maintanence and good performance for the daily driver, something in the range of 210 to 225 degrees of duration @ .050

if you let me know more about the combo you will be running i can get more exact, like, comp ratio, type of heads, intake/carb, headers, converter and rear gear....ect..

jon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
well from the sounds of it you should just stick with a hydralic cam, low maintanence and good performance for the daily driver, something in the range of 210 to 225 degrees of duration @ .050

if you let me know more about the combo you will be running i can get more exact, like, comp ratio, type of heads, intake/carb, headers, converter and rear gear....ect..

jon
9.5:1.....maybe some camel hump heads or something close to them..victor jr intake.....650 holley..full length headers....2500 stall...not sure abou the rear gear though....any suggestions? thanks a bunch
 

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A daily driver with 9.5 compression, the first thing you need to do is forget about that Victor Jr. intake. With a street type cam and rear gearing, and converter size, your car will be happier and faster, and feel much better driving with a dual plane like a Performer RPM. With the limited air flow of factory heads, you don't need an intake that'll breath at 7000rpm because you'll never rev that high, and torque is what gets the car moving. Dual planes build more low rpm torque. Now, the 650 carb is just about right. As for cam shafts, you really need to decide on the heads and gearing first. If you want a couple suggestions, I'd try this cam:
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=LUN-60103LK&autoview=sku
With these heads:
http://store.summitracing.com/partd...4294908216+4294840140+400304+115&autoview=sku
A Performer RPM Air-Gap Vortec, with a 3.55/3.73 rear gear and a good 3000 stall converter and you'll have good old fashioned butt puckering performance. ZRemember, if you take these suggsetions you 'll need self aligning rockers and centerbolt valve covers for the Vortec heads. All you'll need for exhaust is a set of 1 5/8 headers and a good 2 1/4 or 2 1/2 in system and you're all set.
 

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sounds good, i would stick with a dual pattern cam, with 212 @ .050 on the intake and 224 @ .050 on the exhaust and something like .480 lift. You could run an iron vortec head, very cheap and a great bang for the buck, and do yourself a favor and go with the rpm air gap manifold, it will have better torque down low where you will be driving it most over the victor series of manifolds.

and depending on what tire size you go with, a 3.55 to 3.73 should be good...:)

jon
 

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based on your criteria a hyd FT cam would be best.... either ft or roller.. but NOT a solid roller.. that part is based on your question....

there is no advantage at your level to run a roller cam... other than brag factor...
 

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A daily driver with 9.5 compression, the first thing you need to do is forget about that Victor Jr. intake. With a street type cam and rear gearing, and converter size, your car will be happier and faster, and feel much better driving with a dual plane like a Performer RPM. With the limited air flow of factory heads, you don't need an intake that'll breath at 7000rpm because you'll never rev that high, and torque is what gets the car moving. Dual planes build more low rpm torque. Now, the 650 carb is just about right. As for cam shafts, you really need to decide on the heads and gearing first. If you want a couple suggestions, I'd try this cam:
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=LUN-60103LK&autoview=sku
With these heads:
http://store.summitracing.com/partd...4294908216+4294840140+400304+115&autoview=sku
A Performer RPM Air-Gap Vortec, with a 3.55/3.73 rear gear and a good 3000 stall converter and you'll have good old fashioned butt puckering performance. ZRemember, if you take these suggsetions you 'll need self aligning rockers and centerbolt valve covers for the Vortec heads. All you'll need for exhaust is a set of 1 5/8 headers and a good 2 1/4 or 2 1/2 in system and you're all set.
Not for nothing, but I used to drive my Nova to High School everyday with the old steel headed 383...Even with the 254*/260* @ .050" 108* LSA solid roller, large single plane manifold, HP750 with no choke, 4.11's, 8" 5000 stall converter, power nothing and single chamber flowmasters with dumps. Yes. Everyday, until it blew up at the track.

There's no set rules on "streetability" for a daily driver, or any car for that matter...What one considers mild, another considers a full blown racecar...It's all about what you can live with.
 

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I wouldn't have any reservations using a solid roller on the street.
You can them custom ground with any specs and with the proper valve train they won't need adjustment very often.
Hydraulic roller lifters are very heavy and flat tappet cams have wear problems these days. Except for the cost, the solid roller is superior.
 

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I ran a Comp solid street roller (236°@.050) for about 30,000 miles until a lifter failed and beat up the cam.....then I read Comp's instructions about checking the lifters every 3,000 miles!! It was a high 11 second engine.
A roller will make more power than a flat tappet, a solid roller will make more power than a hydraulic roller, but for a mild daily driver, unless you have an unlimited budget and just want bragging rights, why waste the money? The factory did it for economy (less drag and all) but the dollar signs are my main concern--the 383 I'm putting together is the first flat tappet cammed engine I've owned in more than 10 years, but it's just something I'm building with the idea of selling a low cost/high h.p. piece to someone on a tight budget. On my computer software it looks like it will hang with the roller I was going to use because it's a fairly aggressive grind.
 

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Not for nothing, but I used to drive my Nova to High School everyday with the old steel headed 383...Even with the 254*/260* @ .050" 108* LSA solid roller, large single plane manifold, HP750 with no choke, 4.11's, 8" 5000 stall converter, power nothing and single chamber flowmasters with dumps. Yes. Everyday, until it blew up at the track.

There's no set rules on "streetability" for a daily driver, or any car for that matter...What one considers mild, another considers a full blown racecar...It's all about what you can live with.
I agree. I used to drive my 412cid Pontiac with 11.5 compression, 245/255 solid cam, single plane, 3.5" two chamber Flowmasters, 4500 stall, 4.56 gears, front runners/slicks, trick springs, 90/10's as a daily driver for a while, and I though it was plenty mild enough. I just try to answer questions based off the "general" consensus of a daily driver. Most people who want a daily driver don't want to do the maintenance of a more radical set up. Except for those of us who absolutely love the smell of engine oil, and dirt under your finger nails, who else really wants to adjust valves, check carb tuning, and drive slow on the higway because of the monster gears? I do, but most people don't. Also, I base my answer off of how the question was asked, kinda reading into it a little. Hell, I'd drive a pro stock engine on the street if it won't overheat or load up. If you can put mufflers on it, it's a street engine right?
 

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solid lifterss

solids on the street aren't that bad ,, get a set of poly locks or even a stud girdle and i bet the valves won't drift on ya that bad . Good to check them , which isn't a big deal. Might take 15 minutes to run through 'em . If ya love making the others guys sweat when they hear the solid lifter sound when ya pull in ,, its worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A daily driver with 9.5 compression, the first thing you need to do is forget about that Victor Jr. intake. With a street type cam and rear gearing, and converter size, your car will be happier and faster, and feel much better driving with a dual plane like a Performer RPM. With the limited air flow of factory heads, you don't need an intake that'll breath at 7000rpm because you'll never rev that high, and torque is what gets the car moving. Dual planes build more low rpm torque. Now, the 650 carb is just about right. As for cam shafts, you really need to decide on the heads and gearing first. If you want a couple suggestions, I'd try this cam:
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=LUN-60103LK&autoview=sku
With these heads:
http://store.summitracing.com/partd...4294908216+4294840140+400304+115&autoview=sku
A Performer RPM Air-Gap Vortec, with a 3.55/3.73 rear gear and a good 3000 stall converter and you'll have good old fashioned butt puckering performance. ZRemember, if you take these suggsetions you 'll need self aligning rockers and centerbolt valve covers for the Vortec heads. All you'll need for exhaust is a set of 1 5/8 headers and a good 2 1/4 or 2 1/2 in system and you're all set.
the heads will bolt up to an older block pre -1980?
 

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its not the adjustments.. its the solid roller lifter has a very short life....by comparison....

its your engine do what you want... I do have a problem with a solid roller as a daily driver... there is NOT one solid roller lifter that will go 50K let alone 30k miles with out a rebuild....

while the mechanical advantage of a solid roller if far greater than a FT cam..... a FT cam does not have longevity problems if you use your head and break in properly and use Grade 2 oils which has a good zinc package......regardless of your personal oil preference...it may not have what it takes to make a cam live
 

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the heads will bolt up to an older block pre -1980?
Yes, the vortec heads will work on the older blocks. But they do require self aligning rocker arms-no big deal. Also the stock vortec head is lift limited to somewhere around .460 I think so cam choice is limited or you can have the heads modified or retainers trimmed for clearance. Vortec heads on the older blocks is a very common swap-if you do a vortec search there's a lot of information that's been posted.

Veno, what oil are you running with flat tappet cams? My personal stash of old Rotella just ran dry. My last change I used the new Rotella with Lucas break-in additive but I think I need something better. I see Howards has their own ZZDP break-in additive now.
 

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since I was 15...... valvoline racing......

in my current 385 with a very aggressive solid FT cam and my sons 468 with a older agressive solid FT cam... we both use Valvoline VR1 straight 30 weight.....year round..... but I also live in the Houston Texas area.... so I see temps as low as 20 degrees to over 105.....

If I were driving in temps below 20.. then I would switch to a 10W30.. and if I saw temps in the 100 range more frequently I would switch to a straight 40... for the summer

as it is.. we usually only see 100+ degree temps about 4 to 10 times a year... so straight 30 weight fits my needs just fine....
 

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What did my old signature say? ""Street-able" is a term defined differently by each individuals personal abilities to tune and deal without "Creature-Comforts"!!"

I don't like solid rollers on the street for several reasons. Lifter longevity and killing valve springs are just the two most common.
There's nothing wrong with solid flat tappets.:no: I can get them ground with damn near the same lobe intensity (and in a LOT of cases MORE intensity) than 90% of the so called "Street rollers" available and with the right oil and break-in will last well over 50k-75k miles.:yes:

Now, would I run a solid roller on the street? Probably. But I don't mind the issues on the limited millage my hot rod will see. Then again, my "Street Car" is back-halved, big tired, sheet metal interior, manual brakes, manual steering, no a/c or heat, fully caged.....you get the idea. :devil:
 
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