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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For you guys running EFI with an inline pump and did not opt for a $700 EFI tank, how are you guys running your fuel return??

First off, submerged or not? I installed a FAST no weld blind hole compression return port on the top corner of the tank but it has no dip tube. Some say it will cause aeration. Some say is just to reduce the sound of splashing fuel and won’t be a problem.

I also believe that the 3/8 fuel line stainless sending unit assembly has a big enough of a blank spot at the top for installing an Earles return return bung with line to the bottom of the tank.

I guess my question is, can I get away with the I UNsubmerged return or go through the trouble of installing the return with dip tube that runs to the bottom of the tank?

Here are some pics of what I have and what I may do based on your advice.

as you can see in the first 3 pics, the universal port does not have a dip tube it’s not possible because it’s a blind instal, like a rivet, and you can’t get to the other side.

on the last pics, that return port with dip tube seems like it can bolt to the blank part of the top of the sending unit. Putting it on the top of the tank is not possible due to there being no room and no way to get your hand / tools in the tank to screw it in. I do t want to do any welding and want to retain my factory eec tank.

by the way, that dirty sending unit pic is not mine. I got that from a YouTube video. My sender and tank are new and clean.

I’m getting everything ready for a Sniper Xflow unit.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I ran mine like you have it with no issues. I was running a homemade surge tank with the corvette filter. Switched to a tanks inc tank to simplify things. I’ve seen people put the return on the filler neck so I think it’ll be fine.
rebob, did you use a universal compression port? Three companies make it including FAST. They say a dip pipe is not needed. I don’t get it because others say it will aerate the tank.
 

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1963 Nova coupe, Phoenix Arizona
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rebob, did you use a universal compression port? Three companies make it including FAST. They say a dip pipe is not needed. I don’t get it because others say it will aerate the tank.
My son welded a bung right to a NEW tank and just screwed a barbed fitting in to it, it was about the same place as yours, on the front above the seam.
 

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Twenty years ago I ran an inline pump on my 65. I put the return line through the fuel sender. It worked well but with low levels of fuel in the tank I would get a hiccup in fuel delivery because the fuel went away from the pickup in corners. I did one for the 64 I'm building but ended up going with a Tanks Incorporated tank. You can knw use one of the fuel wicks to overcome the low fuel levels. I've still got it on some shelf. You can see a couple of stiffening straps to make it trouble free. I tend to think outside of the box sometimes.
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If you have (or get) a tank with a baffled area for fuel pickup, try to run your return directly into that area to keep it filled. Otherwise, your returned fuel has to get through the baffling to get back to the pickup. If it's a swing door, no problem. But if it is just a couple holes in a tub, your pump could actually empty out that tub because the fuel can't get back in fast enough.

Just a thought...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you have (or get) a tank with a baffled area for fuel pickup, try to run your return directly into that area to keep it filled. Otherwise, your returned fuel has to get through the baffling to get back to the pickup. If it's a swing door, no problem. But if it is just a couple holes in a tub, your pump could actually empty out that tub because the fuel can't get back in fast enough.

Just a thought...
good thinking man. Thanks for the advice. I’m sticking with the factory tank for now, but will keep that in mind if I upgrade.
 

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I get wanting to run a factory tank but you have to realize a 1970 model Nova has a gas tank that is fifty years old. That is fifty years of dirt, rust and grime adding up in your gas tank. A new fuel injection tank from tanks inc. along with everything to make fuel injection work should be in the neighborhood of 500 dollars not including the fuel lines. It's worth it to me to have peace of mind that my fuel system is in good working order. Planning on building a LS powered 66 in a year or so and it will have a new tank in it with the fuel pump in the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I get wanting to run a factory tank but you have to realize a 1970 model Nova has a gas tank that is fifty years old. That is fifty years of dirt, rust and grime adding up in your gas tank. A new fuel injection tank from tanks inc. along with everything to make fuel injection work should be in the neighborhood of 500 dollars not including the fuel lines. It's worth it to me to have peace of mind that my fuel system is in good working order. Planning on building a LS powered 66 in a year or so and it will have a new tank in it with the fuel pump in the tank.
i mean I have a brand new EEC tank that I purchased and installed prior to deciding to go EFI. Everything is new including the sending unit and return port.
 

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i mean I have a brand new EEC tank that I purchased and installed prior to deciding to go EFI. Everything is new including the sending unit and return port.
I did the same thing, basically I figured it could be used for a return or a vent. There really wasn’t any options 12 years ago other then a custom tank $. When tanks inc came out I just sold the old tank which was in great shape and put the cash towards the the tanks inc.
 
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