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I currently have my '64 mordoor on a homemade rotisserie that does not have any jacks to adjust it up and down. The problem is that the car is so high up in the air that I can't get it out of my garage while it is on the rotisserie. I have pretty much decided to purchase a commercial rotisserie but have some questions. The first is which rotisserie to purchase. I'm looking at the Pro CR3000, it seems like it will do the trick but I'm wondering how low it goes to hook up to the car. They offer adapters, has anyone used them to hook the rotisserie to a 1st gen? Will it hook up to my car when the car is on jacks or do I need to lift the car to fit it to the rotisserie? I would like to find one that will attach while the car is on jacks if that is possible. If the CR3000 won't attach to the car on jacks, is there another that will? How was your experience with whatever rotisserie you used? Any help/advice is greatly appreciated. Here are pics of mine on the home made rotisserie. As you can see, it is way up in the air with no way to adjust it up or down. There is only a couple of inches of room between the top of the car and the roof of my garage.
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I would think any mounts for the front of a first or second gen nova would have to be made because of the way they bolt to the firewall. Pretty simple to do. I put my 65 on a rotisserie with two other guys helping and it didn't have jacks. We just kept blocking until we could bolt it up. Same thing when it came off. I was nervous but just be careful and it can be done. I know I won't do a complete build without a rotisserie. It just makes it so much easier to do the cleaning and sheet metal. If cutting sheet metal off I'd advise blocking the car from the bottom of bracing it good.
 

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Didn't think about flipping it over to see if it will go out the door. I haven't tried flipping it at all yet, waiting for the sheet metal guy to get here to assist. Both of the rockers will be replaced and the front floor pans on both sides. Rockers will be replaced one at a time and then floors. Asked the sheet metal guy about bracing, he feels it's not necessary because it's a mordoor. Opinions from this site definitely welcome.
 

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I currently have my '64 mordoor on a homemade rotisserie that does not have any jacks to adjust it up and down. The problem is that the car is so high up in the air that I can't get it out of my garage while it is on the rotisserie. I have pretty much decided to purchase a commercial rotisserie but have some questions. The first is which rotisserie to purchase. I'm looking at the Pro CR3000, it seems like it will do the trick but I'm wondering how low it goes to hook up to the car. They offer adapters, has anyone used them to hook the rotisserie to a 1st gen? Will it hook up to my car when the car is on jacks or do I need to lift the car to fit it to the rotisserie? I would like to find one that will attach while the car is on jacks if that is possible. If the CR3000 won't attach to the car on jacks, is there another that will? How was your experience with whatever rotisserie you used? Any help/advice is greatly appreciated. Here are pics of mine on the home made rotisserie. As you can see, it is way up in the air with no way to adjust it up or down. There is only a couple of inches of room between the top of the car and the roof of my garage. View attachment 399922 View attachment 399923
I just got the Weaver rotisserie. It came with the subframe attachments that need drilled to match the bolt pattern, then it also came with leaf spring adapters that need some modification. Overall I like the Weaver and it was FAST shipping.

Hope it helps,
Scott
 

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I would do some measuring and then go to a local steel supplier and see what they have to add in adjustable ends. You might be able to find some square stock that fits into you vertical end tubes, cut off some of the tube now, and then have the shortened cutoff end slide down onto this new tube with ears that can attach to some hydraulic rams or some type of jack assembly. There are a ton of pictures out there on rotisseries and one should be able to adapt one feature of someone elses into your setup.


As far as doing metal replacement on the car hung at the firewall and rear bumper, I would be hesitant of doing it that way. While each car is going to be different, I know when I replaced both quarters, rear outer wheel housings, taillight panel, and a good section of the hatch floor in my 74, I'm glad I had it supported in numerous spots off of my garage floor because after I cut things off the remaining structure moved and there was no way I could have easily seen this change if I had not done what I did with supports off of the garage floor and if I would have tried hanging new metal onto a moved existing structure I know I would have had issues.

GM too never put together cars using a rotisserie and if it would have been a better way than how they did do it, then they would have gone that route but they didn't.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I have to admit that wasn't what I wanted or expected or wanted to hear. I was under the impression that putting one of the reasons to have the car on the rotisserie was to make it easier to do the sheet metal repairs. I know that I've seen threads about bracing the car during the work, I asked the guy doing the sheet metal about this and he told me that it shouldn't be necessary because she is a Mordoor with more structural support. He is the one I bought the rotisserie from and helped me attach it to the rotisserie. He is obviously not concerned about doing the rockers while the car is on the rotisserie because he's supposed to come over tomorrow to start the work. This is worrisome to me now after reading your post. I'll be having a discussion with him about this tomorrow before letting him start doing the work. My plan was to have the obvious sheet metal repairs done and then getting it dustless blasted. After reading your post it looks like I'm going to get it dustless blasted first and then pulling her off the rotisserie to have the sheet metal repairs done. I'm not sure what you mean by having her supported on the ground. Are you talking about jack stands? If not can you post a pic or two of how you supported yours. As I posted earlier, I need to rockers and the front floor boards including the braces under the floor replaced. Do you recommend doing all the repairs with the car supported on the ground? I originally planned to have all this work done and then get it dustless blasted in the spring. After reading your post it looks like I'm going to get it dustless blasted first and then taking her off the rotisserie to get the sheet metal repairs done.
 

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Wanted to welcome you to the site StoneyIN. It's an awesome site with a ton of Chevy II experts. Enjoy your ride.
 

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Well I have to admit that wasn't what I wanted or expected or wanted to hear. I was under the impression that putting one of the reasons to have the car on the rotisserie was to make it easier to do the sheet metal repairs. I know that I've seen threads about bracing the car during the work, I asked the guy doing the sheet metal about this and he told me that it shouldn't be necessary because she is a Mordoor with more structural support. He is the one I bought the rotisserie from and helped me attach it to the rotisserie. He is obviously not concerned about doing the rockers while the car is on the rotisserie because he's supposed to come over tomorrow to start the work. This is worrisome to me now after reading your post. I'll be having a discussion with him about this tomorrow before letting him start doing the work. My plan was to have the obvious sheet metal repairs done and then getting it dustless blasted. After reading your post it looks like I'm going to get it dustless blasted first and then pulling her off the rotisserie to have the sheet metal repairs done. I'm not sure what you mean by having her supported on the ground. Are you talking about jack stands? If not can you post a pic or two of how you supported yours. As I posted earlier, I need to rockers and the front floor boards including the braces under the floor replaced. Do you recommend doing all the repairs with the car supported on the ground? I originally planned to have all this work done and then get it dustless blasted in the spring. After reading your post it looks like I'm going to get it dustless blasted first and then taking her off the rotisserie to get the sheet metal repairs done.
Just doing a google search, I'm not the only one that would shy away from doing metal replacement on a rotisserie. NOW, there may be just as many people that feel the other way but in the end, it's up to you how to go at things.





Now what I did with supports off of the garage floor I can only describe as I took no photo's back then and whatever I had back then of the car are long gone with the ex-wife.

Anyway I picked a spot in my garage that I could get to everything I needed to replace the quarters, taillight panel, outer wheel housings and a big center section of the hatch floor.

I then also wanted a way to move the shell around and designed 3 assembly jugs. One for where the rear axle would be, a second one at the base if the firewall with the subframe off of the car using the firewall base bushing holes, and then a third assembly that when the frame was in place and the firewall assembly jig was removed, this third assembly bolted to the holes for the front bumper.The first and second assembly jigs were made to where it held the car up to a comfortable height and were measured and then welded up while in contact with the garage floor. The jugs were also made with round tubing to allow swivel casters used on scaffolding to be put in and then allow the car to be rolled around when needed. Before I jacked the car up and put the casters in, I had the car where it needed to be in the garage and then used some 1/2" square steel rubing and measured from spots like by the back bumper area and then plumbed the steel up and tack welded it to a spot under the car that when later I was done I could also get in there to cut open the welds and smooth the metal so no evidence if welded there was left behind. I then picked a spot halfway from the front and rear axle area on the car out by the rocker sills and tack welded in another pair of vertical supports.

The car was now in contact with the garage floor in 8 spots. Since I knew I would be moving the car I then took some spray paint and painted around the supports in contact with the garage floor to outline where they sat. Now later when putting the car back in the same position required lining up the tubes to the paint marks.

The reason I had to do this is I know the garage floor was not PERFECTLY flat and by marking it like I did I had a reference spot.

I THEN started taking metal off of the car with drilling out and grinding away spot welds and guess what, one or more of the vertical supports lifted off of the floor. What happened was there was unseen forces that once some old metal was removed the remaining structure shifted.

All I had to do was then add weight above the lifted supports getting them back into contact on the garage floor and THEN I could start hanging the new metal on an untwisted remaining structure.
What I did worked and I have no idea how much or what metal can be removed before a remaining structure might move but if it does move and you do not know it then I have to think other fit issues will come out to create more work down the line.

Below is one of the few pictures of the jig I have. This was when I had the car in storage and the large caster wheels made it real easy to roll it around and over things. Looking at it I took some old axle stop brackets that bolted into the frame and welded the vertical tubes to them.



All I can add here is take your time and think ahead. Don't go rushing things.

Jim
 

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I just got the Weaver rotisserie. It came with the subframe attachments that need drilled to match the bolt pattern, then it also came with leaf spring adapters that need some modification. Overall I like the Weaver and it was FAST shipping.

Hope it helps,
Scott
Can you tell me more about where you got the weaver rotisserie
Ive just started stripping my 63
 

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Hey Krash Titan X make a nice 4500lb rotisserie comes with nice wheels if you need to roll outside . I made my own you can get the plans from Red Wing. I would NOT replace any full body panels while on the rotisserie. I used mine for cleaning underneath, brace replacement,any welding needed done on the bottom, then painting. Smaller more stout structures like truck cabs may be doable but will need the proper bracing
 
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