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im looking to get a roll cage real soon. anyone have the jegs roll cage in their car? also how long does it take for install?
 

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In my opinion it's best to build or have one built from scratch. It's going to fit much better and you can make it like you want it. Even buying one takes a lot of fitting etc. I've heard Chassisworks makes a nice fitting kit but haven't had personal experience. Mine was built from scratch and it turned out very nice. You have to watch installing them in a car that's already finished too. I've had several friends who ended up with various "boo boos" from welding & grinding inside the car.
 

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Definetly best to have one custom built to your car by a reputable shop. I've used some customers kit pieces and end up throwing most of it away and still being unhappy about the rest. I really steer away from using a customers supplied kit now and like to build them to fit the specific vehicle. When I get done building a cage for a car you cant fit your fingers around most of it, thats how well I fit mine.:D
 

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Seattle_Mike said:
In my opinion it's best to build or have one built from scratch. It's going to fit much better and you can make it like you want it. Even buying one takes a lot of fitting etc. I've heard Chassisworks makes a nice fitting kit but haven't had personal experience. Mine was built from scratch and it turned out very nice. You have to watch installing them in a car that's already finished too. I've had several friends who ended up with various "boo boos" from welding & grinding inside the car.
Yeah...what he said. Make sure that when you are welding or grinding that none of the sparks come into contact with any of the glass, if they do then the glass will be ruined. Best to remove ALL of the interior and glass.....at least cover the glass with welding blankets if you dont want to take it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NIIN20 said:
Definetly best to have one custom built to your car by a reputable shop. I've used some customers kit pieces and end up throwing most of it away and still being unhappy about the rest. I really steer away from using a customers supplied kit now and like to build them to fit the specific vehicle. When I get done building a cage for a car you cant fit your fingers around most of it, thats how well I fit mine.:D

how much time do you usually put into making it?
 

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akanovass said:
how much time do you usually put into making it?
That can really vary on the material. fit needed, and how many bars, etc., etc.. But A 6pt could be knocked out in a 4-5 hours on a decent car I would figure. I probably will have 40-80 hours in the Malibu I am doing right now. But its got alot of bells and whistles and is all moly. These are all just estimate's because I never charge by the hour, only by the job. I really dont keep track of my hours too much.
 

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I used an artt morrison kit, since I could go pick it up and not pay shipping.

my cage fit really well, and is very tight to the car yet allows the whole interior to be reinstalled. The only thing I had to do was remake the visor bar, because the one I got wasn't wide enough.
 

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Most kits are made to fit a general body style and have shortcomings from doing this. The main hoop is in sort of far so the door bars can miss the inside door handles and arm rests and stuff like that. They are also made so an inexperienced hobbyist can install them and weld them in. Most guys who bend bars alot can do a better job but you pay for it. A guy with a bender isn't always the guy you want to use either. You have to think about what you're doing so everything fits and can be welded after you get it in. There are also rules to follow if you plan to race it at a decent track. Last is weight. Kits are usually .134 welded seam tube and a real chassis guy usually uses DOM .120 seamless tube which is lighter but about double the cost of the .134 seamed stuff. JMHO. RM
 

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the problem with .120 wall stuff that i've heard is if sonic tested, your car will fail tech inspection, since the thickness of the walls varies somewhat in each run, and on the bends it gets thinner. maybe this isn't true with DOM
 

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njciscool said:
the problem with .120 wall stuff that i've heard is if sonic tested, your car will fail tech inspection, since the thickness of the walls varies somewhat in each run, and on the bends it gets thinner. maybe this isn't true with DOM
You will have to use .134 wall tubing if you are using electroweld tubing(welded seam). The electro weld tube has variances in the wall thickness due to manufacturing and can vary. Yes you also lose alittle in the OD of the bend. If you use DOM them you want to run I believe it is .125 wall to make up for the bending losses. Now in my opinion moly is the way to go all together. You can use material spot on for the rules. The bad thing I have found with mild steel is that its price is going up alot. DOM is even higher last I checked. If a guy has the access to a good TIG and the competent ability I would do it out of moly. Its not alot more money and myself and everyone I know prefers to use it.:)
 

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I have built 5 MS cages in the past 3 years using .120 DOM and they all certifed for NHRA. My car and another both are certified 7.50 plus ET which is all a MS chassis can be certified for. To go faster you must use moly. The NHRA tech inspector lives down the road so getting them checked is pretty easy for me. They do not check bends ever. Rules plainly state the tube must be .118 min. The seamed tube specs for .120 wall tube allows them to make it as thinner, I've seen .113 so it won't pass, that's why they use .134 wall which I've found to be at least .125. DOM tube has very rigid tolerances which is why it costs so much and I have yet to buy any .120 that was not .120. Check it before you use it but use a ball mic to do it. Moly is great and I just finished a 14 point moly cage in a Mustang, it will certify as well. The only problem with moly is fitting and welding it. It has to be tig welded and you can't fill gaps in the joints so you have to fit it right then you have to be able to weld it without overheating it which alot of folks can't do. MS can be wire welded and alot of loose gaps can be closed up doing that. RM
 

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Real McCoy said:
I have built 5 MS cages in the past 3 years using .120 DOM and they all certifed for NHRA. My car and another both are certified 7.50 plus ET which is all a MS chassis can be certified for. To go faster you must use moly. The NHRA tech inspector lives down the road so getting them checked is pretty easy for me. They do not check bends ever. Rules plainly state the tube must be .118 min. The seamed tube specs for .120 wall tube allows them to make it as thinner, I've seen .113 so it won't pass, that's why they use .134 wall which I've found to be at least .125. DOM tube has very rigid tolerances which is why it costs so much and I have yet to buy any .120 that was not .120. Check it before you use it but use a ball mic to do it. Moly is great and I just finished a 14 point moly cage in a Mustang, it will certify as well. The only problem with moly is fitting and welding it. It has to be tig welded and you can't fill gaps in the joints so you have to fit it right then you have to be able to weld it without overheating it which alot of folks can't do. MS can be wire welded and alot of loose gaps can be closed up doing that. RM
Ooops, thats right it was .120 wall DOM I used on the last MS cage I did.

Your certainly right about the perfect fit on the moly and the fact alot of people burn it either too hot or too cold. The first place a cage will break is in the heat affected zone if not properly welded.
There are just many varibles in people ability's and asperations of abilities that not all "do it yourselfers" should tackle such a project. I have seen alot of the old home brewed cages that looked like a blind 3 year old w/ terets welded them. Definetly need to be a competent welder or a beer buddy that is. Not trying to knock anybody but please be sure of your abilities before taking on such a project. There's nothing wrong with seeking a profesional to do the job.:)
 
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