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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not happy with the clear coat finish on my car. My painter clear coated and color sanded the whole car. Well the paint kept drying and I now have slight amounts of orange peel. Can you re-clear only a paint job without painting the base coat? It's way out of warranty.
 

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I would find a good detailer, it can surely be polished out. Someone can polish paint for 3 days and do nothing,or just cause more damage, another guy can polish for 3 hours and make a section look beautiful, its all technique. Detailing is my specialty. And know that not all detailing shops do good work, because they don't have to. 90% of people don't even see swirls or holograms or clouds so they see a shiny car and leave a great review, when really tge work was crap. I can show you pictures of horrid paint that I've made look fantastic with no fillers or wax used. If its just peel, it can be polished out

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't think you can polish out orange peel. I think it has to be sanded smooth first then polished.
 

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I'd find somebody to cut and buff it. Even if you run into problems it can be fixed. Three coats of clear is a lot using 1500 to 3000 grit sandpaper. If you are really worried about it you should be able to 600 to 800 the whole car and apply more clear. Then you know you shouldn't have a problem. A lot of guys do this when really trying to get a slick finish. They will base coat the car and apply two coats of clear and 24 hours later they will come back and 600 the car and apply two more coats. It's called a flow coat I believe. Getting my jeep ready to paint and I've been burning the midnight oil watching U Tube videos. It's been a loooong time since I've painted anything. Just trying to get caught back up. I have backup if I mess it up too bad. It always helps to have friend who know what they are doing for backup.
 

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I would find a good detailer, it can surely be polished out. Someone can polish paint for 3 days and do nothing,or just cause more damage, another guy can polish for 3 hours and make a section look beautiful, its all technique. Detailing is my specialty. And know that not all detailing shops do good work, because they don't have to. 90% of people don't even see swirls or holograms or clouds so they see a shiny car and leave a great review, when really tge work was crap. I can show you pictures of horrid paint that I've made look fantastic with no fillers or wax used. If its just peel, it can be polished out

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So true- so true. My oldest son has a detailing business on the side- He is a full time refinery operator- detailing is his passion- Doinf high end ceramic coatings now.
He has taught me a lot about detailing and has shown my flaws in polishing with that hand held "sun light"
 

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I don't think you can polish out orange peel. I think it has to be sanded smooth first then polished.
Can you post a picture of the orange peel?
As mentioned orange peel can be removed with wet sanding. People have their new cars wet sanded as even factory paint jobs will have slight orange peel. The clear coat on new cars is very thin- like paper thin.

I wet sanded my 65- had never even buffed paint before. My son lent me his rotary and his older d/a polisher.
I used some 1200 but mostly 1500 then 2000 then 2500 and then buffed and polished. As mentioned I had never done it before and it was nerve racking until I got the hang of it. My buddy who painted my car told me it had lots of high quality clear- six coats of it. My car is not a high end show quality finish but I have gotten lots of compliments about how it looks.

Another friend of mine had one of his drag cars ( 69 Camaro) painted by the same guy and he hired a guy to wet sand and buff- he charged him $1500. It was worth the money as it is a lot of work.
 

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You would be surprised what you an do with the right detailer and the right equipment.

I do professional detailing as my side gig, and I can tell you first hand that a capable detailer should be able to save your paint job without having to re-process it. A paint thickness gauge and very careful, methodical work can accomplish great things.
 

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To Answer a couple of your questions

  1. Yes you could sand 800-1000 the clear if you have enough material-clear if you break thru you have to re-base this is kind of what we call a flow coat during that paint process.
  2. I Agree with the others block the clear with 2000 3000 or 3M Trizact and buff again if you break thru your repainting know the risk.
 

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A cutting compound is designed to do what it sounds like, cut through paint. Pretend you cut a piece of your car off and were holding it in your hand and looking at it from the side, well with a microscope you will see tge peel on the very top, you can "remove" the peel by shaving it down to smooth, therrs more than one way to skin a cat and while sandpaper will do the job this is 2020 and theres chemicals designed to perform better. Theres compounds designed for shaving down the top surface imperfections and making a perfectly smooth surface (hence no orange peel,) then you polish it back up to a flawless shine. I detail better than anyone even remotely close to me, been soing it for years on show cars and dailys and everything in between.
One of tge top rules in detailing is always start with the less aggressive method first and work your way down if you have to, since removing more paint is easy, adding more paint is not. Jumping to saying yeah you should wet sand it is jumping to most aggressive method possible....

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Here should be a clear example. These scratches "swirls" that I was removing on this vehicle were from 11 years of abuse and auto washes, they were pretty deep, other picture is after two passes with the polisher using a medium/light cutting hex pad and a medium/light duty compound, zero polish, zero fillers, zero glaze, zero wax, what you see is only the paint itself BEFORE a actual polish or polishing/finishing pad was ever used.
Now some of those swirls went down into multiple layers of the paint that had to be cut down and "moved around" to smooth leaving a perfectly smooth top layer.
To remove peel you only have to knock the very top surface down so that its perfectly smooth and then tge peel is gone.
Jumping straight into sandpaper is going straight to the most aggressive method possible and its not even close to necessary. But yes it would work because of course it will remive that top surface layer (and then some.)


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Ramportn1 has it nailed it on the head

I do all my own cut and polish on all my builds and always have to work through some orange peel even on fresh clear coats. Sometimes you can get it to lay down with minimal cut and polish. However , mix, ambient temp. Spray gun, quality of gun used , spray booth All come into play . The list goes on. I use one guy to spray my final clears and pay him a grand each time he does it . Why? Because he can lay clear so tight I start with 2000grit go to 3000 grit and then polish
I would suggest the following :
Start at the lower rear quarter and sand with 2000grit ( small 6 inch by 6 inch area). I use only Adams Polishers and Adams swirl kits for my polishing . If you go on their web site , they will lay out the steps with multiple polishing agents used in unison to do a great job . You can do this yourself , but I highly recommend do NOT use large orbital polishers like Dewalt etc. it used to be the way but it’s went the way of the dodo bird and I’m old school . Adams polishing units are designed specifically to not create heat or a burned spot due to the rotary engineering in the head. Yes you can burn but iif you follow the directions and the web site , this system is superior to anything else period.
Your paint can definitely be saved and look great again. I focus on 2x2 areas and work slow , methodical and if I feel any impatience , I set it down and wait until the next evening. I have saved so many crap paint jobs and people ask how I pulled it off, Adams kits period
reach out if I can help support you
also a great cut and polishing book is : How to paint your car on a budget , the guy has a great method on the last pages of the book. Just substitute the Adams polisher and you got a winning method.

my 2 cents worth a penny. 😎
 

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Here is a example : top is 3000 grit cut orange peel removed with a water bug ( I would do it by hand until you get a feel for cut and polish )
Bottom is cut and polished with Adams kit . I use a black light to see swirls and then go back and cut with swirl kit removal from Adams
 

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I would think that there is enough clear to color sand and re-buff. I do all my own paint and body work and have for over 40 years, and I would never try to polish out orange peel. When you polish, your interface is soft enough to where it goes down in the low spots as well as the high spots. When you try and polish out orange peel you will substantially cut the low pars away before the high spots level. With color sanding and a firm block, you just take off the high spots and leave the low spots alone. For light orange peel, I would take 2000 grit on a firm block and sand just enough that all the shiny spots go away and then polish. worst case is you break through the clear and have to scuff the car and shoot the clear again, but 3 coats of clear should still have some room to color sand. Just be sure to tape all edges and corners so you do not sand or buff through the clear,
 

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One of the big questions is what is the paint. Is it a solid color, or is it a metallic? Solid colors. if you break through the clear, you can probably just shoot clear over it and be done. With metallic, if you sand through the clear, chances you will leave a "ring" where you disturb the lay of the metallic pattern. While a good painter can invisibly blend a metallic base coat repair, most would just re-base the entire panel. I touch-up my viper red cars all the time where rock chips and the like damage the paint. A whole lot easier to touch-up a solid paint car than a metallic paint car, especially if the damage is high on the car where it is easily seen.
 

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I don't think you can polish out orange peel. I think it has to be sanded smooth first then polished.
Exactly...peel is is a different animal. Normal tools such as foam or even wool pads can polish smooth surfaces with great results, but peel needs a way deeper cut.
 

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Eastwood has dvds on detailing that really are amazing. Its quite a ardeous process. The dvd is about a hour and they work on a hood. Takes alot of time, but they do work on orange peel . It takes a whole assortment of equipment , i
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I don't want to do it myself. Just want a painter to take the orange peel away. See that it had 3 coats of clear and it has been cut once I don't know how much is left. The color is off a 3 year old KIA. Techno Orange. Wonder how much to spray 3 more coats of clear on and cut and polish it. My budget is about $1000
 

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You're well over $1,000 to get clear sprayed on. Being it to a reputable detailing shop. The one I worked in charged $40/hour. I'm not sure how many hours they would have into it, but they should be able to check paint thickness and give you a direction or quote from there.
 
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