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Discussion Starter #1
I'm replacing the weatherstrip and fuzzies on my 62 convertible which has the wide reveal molding. Got a couple of questions:

Should I use any kind of caulk or adhesive under the reveal molding? It's only held on by a screw on each end. It seems like water could get splashed up from the road under it and into the door insides.

When taking the vent window out to replace the seals there as well I could not get it out until I removed the 2 screws holding the reveal molding and then slid that out to the back. Then the vent frame came out easy. Do I need to kind of reverse that process or can I attach the molding then slide the frame down in the door?
 

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Winch, I think I know what you're talking about. The 'reveal molding' is the stainless piece, about 1 1/4 wide, that sits on the outside of the window at the top of the opening on the door. If that's correct, there are not only screws, but there are 3 clips that fit into the molding that clip it to the door. You need those clips, and they are reproduced, at least they used to be, part number 81004 at GM Classics. The other side of the window, the rubber scraper molding that fits on the inside part of that door opposite the stainless piece, has its own clips that pop in. No caulking.

According to the manual, you do need to remove the outer stainless 'reveal molding' to get the vent window assembly in and out. Once you get the vent window back in and the door glass in the car, you can lower it past the stop blocks to put in the inner window rubber scraper and the outer stainless reveal molding.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here's the molding just set on the door and the holes in the door panel I assume those clips go into? The ones at GM Classic say they are for 66-67. I'll ask if they will work on a 62. Looks like they will. I hope it doesn't matter that I have attached the outer rubber scraper piece to the molding already. I used J B Weld on the little tabs to make a permanent hold. I did that based on other threads I read here.

And wouldn't ya know I just ordered the vent window seals and channel fuzzies from them last week. Also if I use those that answers my question about inserting the vent window frame down into the door then sliding the molding in from the rear. I won't be able to do that with those clips on it. I hope the frame goes in easier than it wanted to come out.

Reveal molding and clip holes in door (3).JPG Reveal molding and clip holes in door (4).JPG
 

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Don't know if a 67 is the same but the vent window on mine had to come out as one screw for the reveal molding is hidden by the vent window
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's why I had to at least disconnect the vent window frame and lean it back so as to get to that screw. I noticed how bad the weatherstrip around it was so I decided to go ahead and take it all the way out. I could not get it to slide up out of the door until I removed that screw and slid the molding out the back. Now if I get those molding clips I'm not sure I can slide it in from the back. I guess I won't know until I try it. The right clip for that molding from GM Classic is part # 81003 for 62-65 convertible, HT and SS
 

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Same on my 66. The reveal moldings on my doors however, use spring clips that insert into slots in the top edge of the door. Can't speak to earlier models. Mine has 3 spring clips and 2 screws, one at each end, and one of them is hidden under the vent window. I would not think that any type of sealant would be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Those clips were not on my driver's door when I removed the trim. I can see now how they would hold the center of the trim tight against the door panel so I guess I don't need to worry about water splashing up under there (Not that I will ever drive it in wet conditions anyway) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Now for a question on the event window seals. I got the new ones on temporarily. The front piece went in the angle nicely. The vertical piece is in there but I haven't bent the tabs over yet. It looks like the top corner needs trimmed. The instructions didn't say anything about trimming but I think I read that elsewhere. Here are pics of how they line up. Should I trim the vertical piece to let the angled back one come over and meet it and align the screw holes?

New WS pieces meeting at top inside view.JPG New WS pieces meeting at top outside view.JPG
 

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More than likely, the rubber is just sitting a little high in the frame. It is almost impossible to get the bottom corner seated all the way on the first try. I take a hammer handle and beat the inside of the corner to drive it further into the channel. Then you just have to work the remainder of the seal lower. If the slot for the hinge is a little high, it is a good indication that the seal needs to slide down a little. It is tough to make it move down, but it can be done. Even the best seal will be a little proud at the top, but the screw will squeeze it down. Just did a pair last night, and not one of my favorite jobs! I use Steel Rubber seals and they are a pain to install, but once they are tucked in the slot, they ain't coming out! I have used seals that tuck easier, but they tend to pop out of the channel on tight windows. I would rather take longer to do the job, and not have to do it a second time.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sounds like you've done a few of these. How do you attach the run channel on the back? Do you pop rivet from the channel side through the 3 holes like original? The ones I got from GM Classics says to attach with adhesive and I've read not to rivet through the channel.
 

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I always put them back in with the same type semi-tubular rivets that were originally used. but I know most guys just glue them in. You can't pop rivet them in, since the only side that you can get at with the pop rivet gun is the backside. This leaves a tail of the rivet sticking out on the inside of the channel, which will interfere with the sash sliding up and down. If you could find a pop rivet gun head that was narrow enough to fit in the channel, there would be no reason you could not pop rivet them, but I have never seen one.
I rivet them with the head in the channel just like the factory, but I made a special set of rivet sets that are ground down on the sides so they will fit in the channel. You also need a special set to "roll" the tails correctly. Al in all, it is probably just easier to glue them in. I used to restore Corvettes for judging, so I invested in the tools years ago, so that everything was just as the factory made them. The NCRS crowd is a anal-retentive lot!
 

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I just went out and looked at a set, and I do not think glue would be a viable option. Two of the rivet holes attached not only the channel, but the bracket to the vent window as well. I think a no-brainer solution for this, would be some small, countersunk machine screws and some self-locking nuts. Insert the screws from inside the channel and put the nuts on the backside of the channel. When you tighten the screws, the heads will pull down in the recess on the run where each of the original rivets were. After tightening, cut off any excess threads on the screws sticking out past the lock nut. This will assure that the heads of the screws does not stick up and bind the slides on the sash. Above the level of the bottom of the vent window needs no attachment, as the sides of the channel spring outward and engage behind the stainless trim, Just tap the channel down in the run, and when it gets low enough, the sides will pop out and engage the trim.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I already had decided to try your suggestion of machine screws. I used 6x32x3/8 with bugle head. They fit down in the countersunk hole nicely. They stick up above the nut a little on the back side but I don't think they will interfere with anything back there will they?

You can use pop rivets if you use a spacer on the rivet stem. I have been following the procedure listed here:


I ran into the same issue when I replaced the after market anti rattle block on the outer window scraper rubber with ones more like the originals my son printed for me. The rivets go down in a hole so I had to use a spacer. Seemed to work OK there. What that procedure doesn't mention is that with a spacer on the stem it doesn't go into the gun far enough (at least on mine). I had to buy 1/2 inch pop rivets on long stems and swap the rivet with a short one then use another rivet for the spacer. I think I will only use a rivet on the very bottom hole. Does the window go that far down anyway?

Like you said all in all I bet semi tubular rivets are the best way to go.

Machine screw holding bracket channel side.JPG Machine screwholding bracket back side.JPG rivettoolwithspacer.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I forgot to post this pic of the frame channel looked at from one end. is it supposed to have that bend in it or did I manage to bend it up? I'm hoping once I get it back in the door and the adjusting bolt through the hole it will pull it back where it should be.

Vent frame channel showing bend.JPG
 

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I would try and tweak it back now.The adjusting bolt is good about pushing, but not so good about pulling! Once it goes into the pulling mode, it will just pull the vent window away from the weatherstrip.
Somebody probably just adjusted the bolt too tight and bent the channel. Once the vent window frame is tight against the weatherstrip, there is no where to go but bending the run. That bend is probably responsible for bulge in the run right below the vent window.
I think the little machine screws are the way to go, but the pop rivets will work good if the spacer gets the heads down tight. With pop rivets, I would only consider stainless rivets. I just do not think that aluminum rivets would be very long-lived.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So you are saying the channel should be straight? I can try to bend it back if so.
 

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i only had two slots for for spring clips on the top of my 63 door. am i missing a slot, then? yikes...

-Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'll get those molding clips tomorrow so I'm ready to put it all back together. I played with it today to see how it goes back together but I'm not sure of the sequence. Here's how I think it goes together:

1. Install outer rubber window scrapper to reveal molding strip (already done so I hope that's first)
2. Install inner fuzzie strip to inner poor panel
3. Align clips in reveal molding to meet slots in door when end screw hole is lined up
4. Clip reveal molding into holes and attach front screw
5. Slide vent frame down into door working the new weatherstrip under the reveal molding where appropriate (some of it is under the molding and some of it above
6. Once weatherstrip is seated attach bolts and adjusting nuts etc to vent frame
7. Install front casting piece
8. Make adjustments to align it

Is that it?
 
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