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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys I’m taking my baby off the road to be striped down and painted. While I have it tore apart I want to remove the sub-frame and have it sand blasted and painted with new body mounts and all the good stuff like that. And I want to take out the rearend and install new bearings and maybe a gear and have it sand blasted and painted and install new bushing on it too. Ok so here is the question. Should I do the suspension and put it all together and then have the car painted? I want to do it quickly (Not like the flyer project) but as easy as possible. Don't worry I'm gonna take a ton of pictures. Thanks guys you’re all the best.
 

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If you do all of the suspension first along with the subframe and rearend assemblies you can certainly take it to the bodyshop next for any metal work, body work, and then paint. You just want to protect what you’ve done to that point so you don’t have to go back and redo things.
If there is to be some welding done I would protect what has been done from welding splatter but use something that won’t easily catch fire from a burning ember or from sparks. Once it’s in the prime and bodywork stage mask off the things you have done real well with plenty of tape and paper to prevent overspray from getting onto things. I would go heavy on the tape and while it will take longer to remove, it might prevent paint from working through any untapped paper joint and onto something. After the bodywork is done, unmask what you masked the first time and repaper and mask it off again as this should prevent any garbage that might have been caught in the paper or not stuck good to the masking tape from coming out and getting into the final paintwork.
On my 73 years ago I was not about to remove the motor and other things on the car and I spent hours and used many, many rolls of tape to protect the engine, the engine bay, and the underneath and also covered the engine in layers (used some towels and wrapped parts with them and then came back with a blanket over the whole engine and then applied masking paper over it).
When I unmasked the car I had but one or two area’s I had to get out some reducer and clean off overspray and I much preferred spending my time sealing it up with things than to spend time cleaning up afterwards. What you spend on tape, paper, and time might be cheaper than your labor to later clean or redo things.
Jim
 

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The way I went was to get all the body work done first right up to final sand and paint, then strip down subframe, paint everything and reasemble. Once everything is back working it goes back for final sand and paint. This way any "accidents" from parts laying all over the garage can be taken be taken care of before paint. If you have to get things sand blasted like window channels etc it prevents getting sand and dust on all your freshly painted suspension and engine etc.

This way has worked out well for me. Just a suggestion
 

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it's like building a house...start with a good foundation.complete all drive train,suspension,steering exhaust,brakes and electrical and repair and paint floor pan and susp components FIRST!if possible,test drive car,break-in engine*(if you're goin' that far),bleed brakes....etc,get all the messy stuff outta the way.then remove battery and plastic and paper mask all areas you are concerned about to prevent overspray on new stuff and contamination on body prior to prep/paint.you may even try a spray on masking liquid like 3m's oml2.it is a water soluble product designed to prevent overspray on stuff.it's not perfect but will work on hard to mask areas like rear diffs and wheel tubs,etc.do not trust this product on conv tops,vinyl roofs,wheels,&tiresdo not start car(that's why we removed battery),but make it a rolling assembly.the bodyshop guys will love you for it.thx,cj.
 

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I guess i am just backwards!

My 65 needed a lot of body work! It was blasted and all the panel repair was completed. The car was painted before I did mechanical or interior work. I had a fully painted body shell to work with. You need a very good place to work if you do that and must be extremely careful. Worked great for me and with no paint lines or overspray it looks great. Seems like that is the way they do it on "Overhaulin'".
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This was just gonna be a tear out the interior and have it painted. But since I'm gonna do that I might as well do the suspension it's 40 years old too. So it looks like everything but engine work. She has a perfect body to be 40 years old with no rust. It was wrecked by the original owner and has some body filler on the driver side quarter panel.
 

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paint it last

With the very solid body and just interior and suspension work I would agree with most of the others even though I did mine differently. Probably the toughest areas to get really great will be around the front and rear glass unless you take them out. The side shouldn't be too bad. Most of the remaining trim comes off fairly easily to get a great paint job.
 
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