Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here are a few how to pics for anyone interested in putting power locks in their 62-65. One neat feature of our cars is the lack of a vertical pull stob for the lock mechanism. This is the usual attachment point of most aftermarket lock kits. So you have to be a little bit creative. There's an older thread that has a few solutions. The first thing I tried was to weld a tab on the lock pawl, as shown by badnova. It didn't work for me. It requires an arc motion, which a linear actuator can't do without a pivot. After looking at the lock mechanism for a while, I asked myself, where do I have a short, linear throw to get the lock to work? The answer is the lock rod. With the actuator in the right place, it can lock and unlock the door easily.



In order to get your actuator in position under the lock rod, you'll need to come up with a bracket. Mine are made out of 16 gauge sheet and braced with 1/4" rod across the corners. They look like they are 90 degree bends, but actually they are 80 to 85. These dimensions will work for most aftermarket power lock actuators, but it would be best if you mocked it up and figured your angles before you started drilling.



The lock rod is a galvanized steel tube. I drilled a couple of holes in it, and cut off a piece of rod that comes with the lock actuator kit, bent it into a staple shape, and welded it to the lock rod.



Here's the actuator and linkage inside the door. With a 5 wire actuator, you can activate both locks with the key from outside, either door handle, or the remote.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Great install Greg.
Thanks again for sending me those GM actuators and pivots to help me figure it out. The GM actuators are strong and have a long throw. I figured if I wanted to use the inside lock handles though, I would need the 5 wire setup. If I had fashioned a vertically oriented bracket, I could have opened the lock pawl with a pivot, but my idea seemed like less work.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,008 Posts
The 5 wire are nice. I had them in the 72 El Camino and they worked well and did not require a switch. When one was moved with the lock knob or key they both responded.

The important factor in the install is to move the linkage on the same plane as the original mechanism. If it is not then binding will occur.

The GM actuators are powerful. I saw a lot of doors that had sheet metal in the mount area broken from the force of them. Later model cars used a reversing motor instead of the solenoid type actuators.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
One caveat to the 5 wire setup I discovered this morning: Because of the amount of spring in the handle pivot, you have to disconnect the lock monitor wires, or locking manually will cause them to unlock immediately. There's no real way around this that I can see. The only solution is to make it a 4 wire system which means:

Open and lock with key remote does both sides.
Open with inside handle, and open with key on either side opens both sides.
Key and inside handle locks one side at a time.

If you removed or broke the return spring in the inside door handle pivot, I think 5 wire would work. I'm happy with it as is.

-Edit-

If you really wanted the 5 wire to work, you could put contact sensors on the pivot and the lock pawl and hook the lock monitor wire to them, but as they say, that is beyond the scope of this project. :D
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,008 Posts
Interesting, the El Camino would do that very occasionally. I would hit the remote to lock and they would cycle a few times. Mine only did it after I had been working on the car without any extended run times on the engine and it caused the battery voltage to drop down under 12.1 volts.

One thing I did not like with the kit I used was the fact it always defaulted to unlocked if the power was removed and then restored. It was nice if I locked myself out as disconnecting the battery and then reconnecting would unlock the door, but made it easier for thieves too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Thanks for the bracket idea and pull linkage pictures. I have an aftermarket kit on my 64 wagon doors and it worked for a short time after installation. I was durn discouraged that I could not get it to work consistantly and thought I would have to go with heavier pull solenoids. Now with your hints, I am armed with new ways to go about it and get some better results.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the bracket idea and pull linkage pictures. I have an aftermarket kit on my 64 wagon doors and it worked for a short time after installation. I was durn discouraged that I could not get it to work consistantly and thought I would have to go with heavier pull solenoids. Now with your hints, I am armed with new ways to go about it and get some better results.
Glad to help. Because the rod holds everything in place, it is very consistent. I could lock and unlock until my battery ran down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Great thread

3 questions
1. Are you still happy with this setup after almost 4 years?
2. What are the make/model GM actuators out of?
3. Will this application work on the rear doors as well?

Thanks
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top