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1972 Nova - 4 door - straight 6
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking about using POR15 on my surface rust but now i am going to pick up a sand blaster so i can blast my rims. Would using the sand blaster on the surface rust areas make more sense (it would be cleaner) but would the cost of the media be more then the POR15???
 

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1967 Nova SS
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If your going to buy a blaster anyway the media shouldn't got much if any more than the POR15. Also on rims, you would want to get rid of all the rust to have a decent looking finish and POR15 doesn't stick good on bare metal.

Before I went with disc brakes and new rims on my truck I blasted them and powder coated. Turned out nice I thought.
 

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I was thinking about using POR15 on my surface rust but now i am going to pick up a sand blaster so i can blast my rims. Would using the sand blaster on the surface rust areas make more sense (it would be cleaner) but would the cost of the media be more then the POR15???
Both is Best
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I definitely am blasting the rims. I used por15 quite a bit on my vw project years ago and I can’t imagine rims turning out good. I don’t know if I can afford powder coating, but will paint them at the very least.
 

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Look into the Eastwood powder coating system. I use it along with an oven that was given to me and I get great results. A wheel should fit in the oven so you could technically do it yourself.
 

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1972 6 Cylinder Dragster :)
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agree 100% with @Fzeed
Por-15 is decent for stuff that won’t see too much scrutiny, backside of panels, frame rails etc. I’m struggling to find the words to explain how Por-15 looks when applied and I’ll just say that it doesn’t seem like it goes on smoothly or consistently. In a single sentence: Por-15 looks crappy…at least my experience with it. I applied following their instructions and used the little foam applicator. Thinning and spraying it would probably come out better.

If you’re going to sandblast stuff, it might help with how it applies, I really can’t say for sure.

I once played the “Let’s eliminate rust on a vehicle” game. I lost. I spent a ton of money and time trying to eliminate rust and I came to the realization that I’m not rich enough or skilled enough or patient enough to tear a car down and work on it consistently for years to pull something like this off

(this happens to a lot of guys who decide to tackle bodywork and if you check on craigslist you can usually find unfinished projects that are partially assembled any week of the year)
 

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1972 Nova - 4 door - straight 6
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
agree 100% with @Fzeed
Por-15 is decent for stuff that won’t see too much scrutiny, backside of panels, frame rails etc. I’m struggling to find the words to explain how Por-15 looks when applied and I’ll just say that it doesn’t seem like it goes on smoothly or consistently. In a single sentence: Por-15 looks crappy…at least my experience with it. I applied following their instructions and used the little foam applicator. Thinning and spraying it would probably come out better.

If you’re going to sandblast stuff, it might help with how it applies, I really can’t say for sure.

I once played the “Let’s eliminate rust on a vehicle” game. I lost. I spent a ton of money and time trying to eliminate rust and I came to the realization that I’m not rich enough or skilled enough or patient enough to tear a car down and work on it consistently for years to pull something like this off

(this happens to a lot of guys who decide to tackle bodywork and if you check on craigslist you can usually find unfinished projects that are partially assembled any week of the year)
I used a lot on a '62 VW. Its not pretty at all but it was on stuff that was hidden anyway.
 

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Look into the Eastwood powder coating system. I use it along with an oven that was given to me and I get great results. A wheel should fit in the oven so you could technically do it yourself.
To paint the rims, you'll spend about $60 for primer and paint and then it's gone.

The Eastwood unit is super easy and you get good results. For around $200 you can get the two stage gun and enough powder to do all your rims and then some. There is always a oven for sell on Craigslist on Market Place. I paid $50 for mine. You can powder coat all sorts of small parts.

Once you buy the gun, you'll have it to use over and over on all sorts of stuff.

Hood Hinges, Fender braces for my 67.


Automotive design Motor vehicle Wood Automotive tire Bumper


Front wheel parts.

Creative arts Art Paint Font Graffiti
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'd love to be able to powder coat but i wouldn't have room for a stove. But now that idea is stuck in my head uggg.
 

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For wheels, I'd go with wheel paint. Primer if the instructions for the specific paint you use call for it on bare steel (or bare aluminum if you have aluminum wheels). Also, pix of the wheels might help here. I seem to remember seeing chrome inserts around the holes in your "rallye" style wheels. If those are present, carefully remove them prior to sandblasting, and polish them separately, then reinstall after the painted wheels have thoroughly dried.

For larger areas (bottom of floor pan, frame rails, etc.) Use what you're comfortable with, following the manufacturer's recommendations for the product.

I like the "Rust seal" product from KBS coatings. They sell a kit for frame coating that will do the frame on most full size cars. The kit includes a phosphoric acid solution to "dissolve" any remaining rust, and a cleaner that's compatible with their coatings. The coating itself is a polyurethane that is brushed on. It sticks to directly to metal, even rusty metal, and forms a permanent barrier against moisture, oxygen and other chemicals. It can be sanded and primed/painted. It can be applied with a brush, roller, or sprayed. I usually brush it on. I don't recommend spraying unless you have a good supply of cheap nozzles for your spray gun. It's a bear to clean up after using this stuff. Conventional thinners/cleaners won't do anything to the stuff once it starts to harden. I use the cheapest "glue brushes" I can find and throw them away after working with the stuff. The best thing about this stuff is that if you apply it to something that's rusty and pitted, and you can't get all the rust removed, this coating will preserve the current state of the metal, preventing any further rusting and keeping it just as it is when the coating is applied.
 
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