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Discussion Starter #1
What would you say the best way to removal paint from my 63?Would you use the paint stripper or sandpaper?Which is the best product made for stripper and grit i should use for sandpaper.
 

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i used paint striper on my 63 and became nothing but headaches. You need to use something to neutralize the chemicals if not you will have future rust ( which I have now). If you can have it bead blasted that would be best.
 

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striper

dont use the striper if you are doing the entire car.:no:

if its just a fender or a small panel that you can wash off and neutralize its fine.but if you dont you are going to start a rust farm.

my buddy did his bug with striper we cleaned that car really good.spent 3 days making sure we got it all neutralize.but 5 years later the bug had really really bad rust on the front of the door pillars and door sills.:(

dont do it.

i am tearing my 63 ss so that i can get it media blasted.i found a guy that will come to my house and pick up the car shell.blast it seal it and bring it back.he will do the outside inside and under the car for $1400.

when you think about how much time and money you will spend doing it with sand paper i think its well worth it.
 

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I did my entire car with basically plastic coated wire wheels. It striped paint like a champ but left the metal scratchless!(bondo eats them though) I got mine at Walmart for about 6 bucks, they were M3 brand. The style I used was used in a drill but they had ones for other applications.:cool:
 

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The ideal method would be a walnut shell or plastic media type abrasive blast. But if yer looking to do it at home I would suggest the abrasive paper.

I did my 62 in my garage. I used a D/A sander with 80 grit paper, and lots of it. You want the paper to be cutting not buffing and creating heat.

Those plastic coated wire wheels sound like the ticket for the tight areas.. JR

Oh, some pics...



 

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wow

hey JR how long did it take you to do it all by sand paper?

it looks great.

did you buy the sand papper in bulk?

bigds63
if you do it by sand paper if you hit any areas with bondo.dont waste your sand paper trying to sand it off.take a heat gun to the bondo heat it up not too much and with a putty knife it will just pull away.

i tried to remove bondo with a da sander then a grinder.wow what a mess.then someone told me about heating it.wow it comes right off in chunks.no dust just sweep it up and in the garbage.
 

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You can get big rolls of DA paper at any body supply place our local nap carries itor make buddy that is a body man and the trucks go to their shop and they don't mind cash sales
 

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If you are having problems after stripper you are not doing it right.
For the DIYer chemical strip or sanding works well. They require more labor
but are cheaper if you consider your time free. They are a good way to stay on budget.

Abrasive blasting with soda, bead or shells also works but requires more cash up front. Soda requires neutralizing and sanding before priming.

Any of these methods give great results if done properly.
 

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Once you have it down to metal do you guys put some sort of metal conditioner prior to priming?

-Justin
 

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I think I seen a couple guys use these. I think I paid like $5 at home depot for one of these. I was able to strip a 1 foot by 1 foot section with a good wired drill in a couple minutes. They work awesome on rusty areas.

 

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Discussion Starter #12
So if i am going the sanding route then i need 80 grit paper?Why not 40 or 36 grit will this leave to much for the primer to fill.If i go the stripper route then i must watch out for rust later down the years?The paint is a least 3 layers,maybe i should try the wire wheel?
 

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So if i am going the sanding route then i need 80 grit paper?Why not 40 or 36 grit will this leave to much for the primer to fill.If i go the stripper route then i must watch out for rust later down the years?The paint is a least 3 layers,maybe i should try the wire wheel?
36 or 40 is a little aggressive. If you had many layers of paint you could take a few layers off with 36 then finish the last few with 80 grit. I like to finish down to 240 grit, but read the tech sheet for the primer to get their recommendation.
No you will not have to worry about rust later with stripper. I have been using stripper for 25+ years, still see some of the older cars and have had no problems and have never heard of any problems when stripper is used properly.
I wire wheel is not the best choice, I feel it does not leave enough of a scratch profile. Use a sander and the "plastic wheel" shown in shaggy's post.
If you can find the purple plastic wheel, it lasts longer. It is not a consumer version, you would have to go to a body shop supply place.
 

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It is always best on old vehicles to start with a solid foundation. Paint that is many years old is not a good foundation, so we have the need to strip. Getting to bare metal allows us to see all the damage and correct any previous areas that may have been fixed improperly or have used outdated materials. Chemical stripping is one of many ways to get to bare metal.
Chemical stripping involved using powerful chemicals to soften and lift the paint so it can be scraped from the surface. Because of the strong chemicals they need to be used in a well ventilated area. The use of a cartridge filter mask, rubber gloves, safety glasses, and long sleeves and pants is also necessary. The thin disposable type nitrile or vinyl gloves will not work. You need the thick gloves, the type you can hardly bend your fingers in when wearing them.
For painted steel, I use Klean Strip Aircraft Stripper part no. AR-343. In some parts of the country there are regulations against some of the chemicals in this stripper. Klean Strip offers other versions that comply with these regulations, check with your local jobber. Other brands will also likely work but I have found Aircraft stripper to be the best and fastest overall.
For plastics and fiberglass use Klean Strip Fiberglass Paint Remover part no. QAF-354. Do not leave any stripper on a plastic too long, it can distort the plastic. Monitor it closely and scrape often and reapply.
Any panels that can be easily removed should be removed and placed on stands so they are laying horizontal. I use some quality duct tape to tape around the perimeter of the panel covering 1/8” or so at the edge of the panel. This keeps the stripper from migrating over the edge of the panel. Even if you plan on stripping the back of the panel you do not want stripper getting into the hem flange or metal joints where you won’t be able to get it out. That last 1/8” of paint around the edge can easily be removed later with a DA sander.
If a panel cannot be removed, use duct tape around the edge and over joints.
I lay cardboard on the floor under and around the panel. This catches the drippings when I am scraping off the softened paint. In our municipality, I can let these dripping dry for a day or so then put the cardboard in the garbage. This saves a lot of cleanup time. Check your local solid waste regulations.
Pour some stripper directly onto the panel or into an empty quart can then onto the panel. Use a cheap 1 ½” paint brush (59 cents at the local home store) to spread the stripper evenly across the surface. I caution you to not attempt too large of area at one time. The stripper needs to be wet to work so a large area may dry out before you get to scraping all of it. I would work on half or a quarter of a hood at a time. Work you way up to larger areas as you gain experience. Environmental conditions can also affect the size of the area I work on. Avoid windy areas, direct sunlight, areas where the furnace is blowing on the panel. This will speed up evaporation of the solvents in the stripper and not allow it to work properly. Hot weather also speeds evaporation. On vertical panels you may need to keep brushing it back up when it sags.
Be patient. As the stripper works you will often see it start to wrinkle the surface. This is kinda neat to watch. Let it do it’s work. Sometimes the paint won’t wrinkle it will just get soft.
When it is done wrinkling or getting soft you can start scraping off the softened paint. I use a flexible blade 3” wide putty knife. I do not want something sharp to gouge the metal. Push the putty knife across the surface and deposit the old paint into a cardboard box. When this dries in the box I can also put it in the garbage.
You will find that not all the paint was removed in the first attempt. You have to decide if you need to put more on a few areas or if sufficient paint has been removed that you can get the rest with the DA sander. You can reapply as many times as you need to.
After you have scraped off all the loose paint, it is time to neutralize the stripper. I start with some automotive grade lacquer thinner. NOT the lacquer thinner from the hardware store, it’s not the same. Wet a rag with the thinner and wipe the surface thoroughly. You will find that this not only starts to neutralize the stripper but also removes some of the smeary old paint that is still present. It will take a few rags and multiple wipes to get it clean. Some use a hand wire brush at this stage but I find it unnecessary and it just makes a mess out of the wire brush.
Now take off the duct tape around the edges. Move the panel to an area where you can wash it with the garden hose. Don’t hose it where it is and get the cardboard soaked! Use soap and water and an old rag to thoroughly scrub the panel, including the backside to make sure all the stripper is neutralized and removed. I use an old terry wash mitt for this. If you do this, make sure you keep it locked away so no one uses it to wash a car.
Once the panel is clean dry it off completely. Follow up by blow drying with an air nozzle, including all the seams and crevices.
You should have a panel that is relatively free of paint with just a little around the edge. The next step is to do some sanding so you have mechanical adhesion for your primer. You may need to use 80-180 grit on the DA sander to remove the 1/8’ paint line around the edge. Follow by using 240 grit on the DA and sand the entire panel. Every area should be thoroughly sanded to ensure maximum adhesion. If you are not sure if you sanded enough, sand some more. I am hesitant to use finer grits because they may not provide the “tooth” needed for mechanical adhesion. Almost all panels that are stripped will require a primer-surfacer anyway so 240 grit scratches is not an issue. Consult the tech sheet for the primer to see their recommendations on grits if in doubt.
Now you should have a panel that is ready for final clean and priming.
I welcome any other input, always looking to learn new ways.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the reply,i will strip the chevy ii with the airplane stripper and then use the da to remove the remaining paint.What about the plastic filler will the stripper soften it enough to remove or would you da it?Again thanks for your detailed reply i am getting impatient and want to get the chevy ready for paint
 

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Thanks.. It took me (I think) about three weeks 2-3 hours a day. And that was the trunk and door jambs also. I bought my paper from autobody toolmart when I didnt have the right grit. I also did some primer work. I have saved huge buying abrasive off ebay over the years and have a good stockpile. All good 3M paper. JR
http://www.autobodytoolmart.com/

hey JR how long did it take you to do it all by sand paper?

it looks great.

did you buy the sand papper in bulk?

bigds63
if you do it by sand paper if you hit any areas with bondo.dont waste your sand paper trying to sand it off.take a heat gun to the bondo heat it up not too much and with a putty knife it will just pull away.

i tried to remove bondo with a da sander then a grinder.wow what a mess.then someone told me about heating it.wow it comes right off in chunks.no dust just sweep it up and in the garbage.
 

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Technova had a great post. So yer gonna go with the chemicals huh?? Ok,, Follow ALL his precautions using the stuff. I have had some nice chemical burns through gloves. Even the ladies dish washing type are not good enough. An more importantly is eye and lung protection. Just takes one lil flip of a drop in yer eye to make you sorry you ever decided to work on the car. And chemical burns to your lungs are something you may regret. The good strippers are really nasty. The weaker safe stuff is a waste of time.

Stripping paint is just difficult any way you look at it. Time consuming, dirty but well worth it if you want a good base to work from..

Oh, the chemicals will ruin the plastic filler. You need to remove it all after the chemicals have sat on it for any amount of time. Let the chemicals soften it up and use a scraper blade to scrape it off.

One last thing. When you sand the remaining paint after the chemicals (which I dont think you will have to) use good protection again, DONT breath the chemical laden dust. JR


Thanks for the reply,i will strip the chevy ii with the airplane stripper and then use the da to remove the remaining paint.What about the plastic filler will the stripper soften it enough to remove or would you da it?Again thanks for your detailed reply i am getting impatient and want to get the chevy ready for paint
 

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Hey Bigds63.. I posted some pics of my paint stripping/priming process. Its a re-run, sorry guys. Just thought you may have missed it so here it is again.. This might give some motivation. Cant wait to see your pics. We all love this stuff. JR



Started with a total stripping of the paint and body filler, down to shiny metal. Some hammer and dolly work along with some welding. Epoxy. Then body filler and glazing putty and a LOT of sanding. Then another coat of epoxy to seal the filler and some sand through spots. Then three coats of high build 2K primer. Block sanding forever. And finally today, three coats of epoxy. All SPI products. Good stuff.

Now she will sit in epoxy for maybe a year while I work out some details. Like proper door and fender alignment. Final engine bay work. Stitch up the loose wiring. And focus on the interior.



After the stripping with a D/A and 80 grit paper. A lot of paper LOL






After the SPI high build primer





After the dry guide coat





This is a shot of the block sanding process. The stuff in a buff color has been blocked down. Took three weeks to block sand the guide coat off. Little pressure and LOTS of paper changes...



And then today. The final coat of epoxy.. This was about five hours after spraying. Im gonna put the car out on the driveway tomorrow to make sure to bake out any solvents. Gonna be HOT here tomorrow...









 
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