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No,

It was slight of hand at me, constructively.

More volume flow is good, but proper flow has a purpose when calibrated for the given specifications of an engine.

OP, What has happened since you put in the t stat?
 

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And you just answered your own question. If the fluid (water/coolant), is traveling too fast through the radiator, the radiator can not pick up any heat and get it out of the system.. To have a functioning cooling system, you must have a adequate radiator, a working water pump, a good shroud, and a working t-stat.. These are the basic 4 components, not mentioning hoses that don't collapse..
I hate to break it to you but this is an old wives tail. If you follow racing and mechanical engineering journals as Mike and I have you will know pushing coolant as fast as you can up to the point to where the radiator acts as a serious restriction you produce the greatest cooling. The research is clear. Do your homework before spreading old myths.
 

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I hate to break it to you but this is an old wives tail. If you follow racing and mechanical engineering journals as Mike and I have you will know pushing coolant as fast as you can up to the point to where the radiator acts as a serious restriction you produce the greatest cooling. The research is clear. Do your homework before spreading old myths.
Ok, so you state to push the coolant as fast as you can to where the radiator acts as the greatest restriction will give you the greatest cooling, the thermostat is acting as the restriction, holding back the coolant in the radiator so the radiator can cool the fluid, and when that happens, the t-stat will open and add cool coolant to the system.. I suppose you don't believe in shrouds either.. Tell me, if the better cooling system is one without a t-stat, why have all manufacturers of autos been using t-stats in their systems for years.. Maybe you should do your homework before your bad advice causes someone to lose an engine or two....
 

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The good news is, I put a new thermostat in my air cooled engine, it no longer over heats. Thought I had a big problem for a while.
And there you go. The basics of trouble-shooting is you start with the least expensive, the simplest, and the easiest to get to part FIRST.. Trouble-shooting has gone away, now it's all techno people who plug their computers in and try to figure it all out.. Being educated doesn't mean your smart.
 

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The good news is, I put a new thermostat in my air cooled engine, it no longer over heats. Thought I had a big problem for a while.
If you are referring to an air cooled VW then for years I watched folks remove the thermostat and the flaps inside the engine shroud only to have the engine run hot. But I suspect you're just being a smart A$$:D
 

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I have it both ways. I have a one inch Miziere spacer between my thermostat and the thermostat housing. The spacer has two -6 lines that go back to the rear corners of the intake, (air-gaps and some other manifolds have these water ports).
Due to the way water flows in a SBC the rear cylinders run hotter than the fronts. "Bleeding-off" water from the back of the heads and returning it to the radiator without it having to go to the front of the cylinder heads and thru the 'stat does a lot to increase flow and balance out temperatures.
So, you could say half of my water goes thru a 'stat on the way to the radiator.
 

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Ok, so you state to push the coolant as fast as you can to where the radiator acts as the greatest restriction will give you the greatest cooling, the thermostat is acting as the restriction, holding back the coolant in the radiator so the radiator can cool the fluid, and when that happens, the t-stat will open and add cool coolant to the system.. I suppose you don't believe in shrouds either.. Tell me, if the better cooling system is one without a t-stat, why have all manufacturers of autos been using t-stats in their systems for years.. Maybe you should do your homework before your bad advice causes someone to lose an engine or two....
No one is advocating for running without a thermostat, the are necessary to get the engine up to operating temperature as quickly as possible to reduce the wear. As I pointed out before, the thermostat restricts the flow of coolant by remaining closed until the engine is warm, then opening to pass coolant so the engine can stop increasing in temperature.
The radiator is a heat exchanger, not a water cooler. It's job is to dissipate heat into the air coming through the fins.
The maximum exchange rate is when the radiator is as uniformly hot as you can get it, meaning the rate of heat exchange is as high as you can get it all across the radiator.
Remember, we are talking about a closed system, and when the water slows in one part, it slows in all parts. Leaving a unit of water in the block longer will result in an increase in temperature at the outlet of the block, typically where we take our temperature readings from. This is how we warm our engines up - slow the flow through the system.
I've done my homework, perhaps you will read the link I posted above as your homework. Here's some more reading...

A common misconception is that if coolant flows too quickly through the system, that it will not have time to cool properly. However the cooling system is a closed loop, so if you are keeping the coolant in the radiator longer to allow it to cool, you are also allowing it to stay in the engine longer, which increases coolant temperatures. Coolant in the engine will actually boil away from critical heat areas within the cooling system if not forced through the cooling system at a sufficiently high velocity. This situation is a common cause of so-called "hot spots", which can lead to failures.
https://www.stewartcomponents.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=11
 

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If you are referring to an air cooled VW then for years I watched folks remove the thermostat and the flaps inside the engine shroud only to have the engine run hot. But I suspect you're just being a smart A$$:D
Dang you!!

Super winner.. winner!

I haven't had a Bug since 2007 either..
 

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Dang you!!

Super winner.. winner!

I haven't had a Bug since 2007 either..
Nice clean engine!! My first car was a 64 VW bug. Paid $35.00 I may have overpaid but that was 1973.:D

That image brings up another point. Does the increased oil tank reduce oil temps???
 

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^^ Ouch for today, love the 66 and older bugs. Wish $35 would get any car today.

I had an 1885cc (I think) and a 2180cc. My stock bug couldn't make up a hill when a plug popped off, drivers were not happy..
 

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That image brings up another point. Does the increased oil tank reduce oil temps???[/QUOTE]
A greater quantity of oil doesn't make the oil run cooler.....it simply takes longer for it to get (just as) hot.
 

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That image brings up another point. Does the increased oil tank reduce oil temps???
A greater quantity of oil doesn't make the oil run cooler.....it simply takes longer for it to get (just as) hot.[/QUOTE]

Yes, but in a VW it also keeps the oil over the pickup. :yes::yes::yes:
 

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Two misconceptions.
1. More water flow makes water heat up because it is passing through the system too fast.
2. Too much air flow causes overheating for the same reason. There is no point at which greater volume of air or greater volume of water will cause overheating.

That being said, there are cases where removing the thermostat will cause overheating! The simple side of us just figures that a lack of thermostat automatically equates to more water flow through the radiator, but in some cases, the water flow actually decreases when you remove the T stat!

This is all because of a specification related to all centrifugal pumps called NPSH or Net Positive Suction Head. If you do not maintain at least the original NPSH that a pump was designed for. The pump will experience cavitation. An excess of cavitation will lead to loss of flow. Removing the T stat can allow the discharge head of the pump to drop, which can then allow the pump to drop below the minimum NPSH, which then causes cavitation, when then causes a lack of flow! Cavitation can be so bad and go on for so long that it will slowly start to erode away the impeller of the pump. We see this on industrial pumps all the time. If you pull an impeller out of a pump and it has a sandblasted appearance, the pump has been cavitating.

I know this is way more than y'all wanted to know about pumps, but this is part of what I do all day long!

I run a Tstat in all my cars and I run 195 degree Tstats. The main function of a T stat is to allow the engine to warm up quickly. Too cool a coolant temperatue can cause sludge buildup in an engine. Oil has to warm up enough to drive all the moisture and other condensibles out of the oil. T stats are designed to control minimum temperatures of engines, not maximum temperatures.
 
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