Chevy Nova Forum banner

21 - 38 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Just sucked it up and bought the wire harness. JEGS finally ran a discount code $50 off $500, which essentially took care of the taxes.

That's an insane price for a wiring harness, but I suspect it will be a small price to trade for all the aggravation it will save me my first time wiring.

It will be a few weeks at least before I get started, but I'll update with my experience with the American Autowire harness.
Hey, if it helps- good wiring is a reliability mod! Sure, it's not a shiny supercharger poking out the hood or a loud exhaust but chasing wonky electrical issues is not fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Make sure that you get a wiring schematic for your year car. take it and look at your engine wiring harness follow each wire by socket position in the firewall connector and wire color and you will be able to figure it out I made all of my own harnesses the only one I didn’t make was the under dash one with the fuse box. I also added some custom stuff such as relays for the headlights. Here’s a web site that’s really helpful
Madelectrical.com

Wiring a car is not hard it just takes patience and lots of studying the schematic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
I found it very helpful to keep the old wire harness as a template to build the new harness. I covered my harness in Techflex and used marine heat shrink from harbor freight to terminate the ends. It came out great, the AAW kit is worth the extra money. I installed a painless kit in my '58, AAW is a much more comprehensive kit.

AAW will tell you to buy the 2 crimp tools for $100 each. They also say you should solder all joints just to be safe. If you are soldering you don't need a crimp tool. I would suggest crimping with needle nose pliers and soldering all joints and forget about the crimp tools.

Here's a few pictures of some finished sections.
https://www.stevesnovasite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5812689&postcount=118
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Make sure that you get a wiring schematic for your year car. take it and look at your engine wiring harness follow each wire by socket position in the firewall connector and wire color and you will be able to figure it out I made all of my own harnesses the only one I didn’t make was the under dash one with the fuse box. I also added some custom stuff such as relays for the headlights. Here’s a web site that’s really helpful
Madelectrical.com

Wiring a car is not hard it just takes patience and lots of studying the schematic.
Jmorr, you can get a very cool laminated color coded wiring schematic at ClassicCarWiring.com for less than $20. Click here for the one for your '70.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
816 Posts
Buy a proper crimping tool. The strength of the connection depends on using one.
The terminals can not be properly installed w/o the correct tool. You do not have to buy the pricey AAW crimper set, Summit sells a crimper that will get the job done for $35. Part number: SUM-900401.

The AAW terminals have an "open barrel" and the terminals have clamping flanges that have to be ROLLED-IN to the wire while being crushed.

AAW has a good crimping video on their site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Thanks again, guys. I think I will buy the summit crimping tool, because I'm not familiar enough to be confident I've done a good job with needle nose.

Techflex looks sharp, was there one size that would work for the whole car or did you have to swap up based on what section you were doing?

The wiring schematic is cool, but I'm completely hosed if I have to know how to read one. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
The kit came in yesterday. Sooner than I was expecting. I've got to finish the transmission before I can make time for it. Everything looks good though. Kit includes a lot of things I didn't expect like the bulb sockets for the breaks/reverse lights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
Thanks again, guys. I think I will buy the summit crimping tool, because I'm not familiar enough be confident I've done a good job with needle nose.

Techflex looks sharp, was there one size that would work for the whole car or did you have to swap up based on what section you were doing?

The wiring schematic is cool, but I'm completely hosed if I have to know how to read one. lol
I used two sizes, 1/4 and 3/8. Or maybe 1/2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Sadly I'm just now getting back around to starting the wiring job. While it does appear to be a great kit, I see now that it doesn't include anything for speakers, so I'll have to make additional purchases for this already expensive kit. I see references to the dome, but it may not come with the dome light wires either. Seems like they would note "this kit does not include..." so that you can get those together and so you'll know how much money you'll have in the job.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,434 Posts
Sadly I'm just now getting back around to starting the wiring job. While it does appear to be a great kit, I see now that it doesn't include anything for speakers, so I'll have to make additional purchases for this already expensive kit. I see references to the dome, but it may not come with the dome light wires either. Seems like they would note "this kit does not include..." so that you can get those together and so you'll know how much money you'll have in the job.
Just like sudden_impulse stated that maybe the car came with just a single dash speaker and if it did you should have at least the accessory power/illumination/ground plug in your new harness.

Chances are AAW views not including some wires in the basic kit as the radio was an option just like a rear defroster, air conditioning, rear speaker, tape player, indash clock, underhood/trunk lights, and possibly even a pin switch in the passengers door jamb. I don't think they sell a kit with everything and may only offer these optional wires when ordered by themselves.

The nice thing is you can get the proper parts to add what you need and if you are adding additional things not included with the kit is maybe try and color code it to match an original diagram or if an aftermarket radio is installed, document what wires are doing what with your own diagram written out or drawn out. .

Take your time installing the harness and routing things well so there are no issues later.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Thanks, guys. Definitely going to take my time... as I don't know what I'm doing. lol But going to do what I can to do her up right. I didn't think about a pin switch on the passenger side door and probably wouldn't have if you hadn't mentioned it, it's something I'll look into. I know I also want to look at adding a convenient kill switch since there is practically no interior to get in my way.

I'm not sure what the original speaker set up was. There are speaker cutouts in the rear window tray, but that tray may not be original to the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
As Custom Jim said, you can add circuits for desired conveniences later, as most fuse blocks offer spare fused output terminals just for this purpose.

Full Harnesses can be overwhelming at first but installing harness wiring itself is very logical. The more difficult engineering of fuse sizing, wire sizing (gauge), layout, general length and colour-coding is already done for you.

Just TAKE YOUR TIME and resist cutting ANYTHING until you have all the circuits routed in-place and are 100% sure of the length needed. In fact, I recommend leaving them long by 6 inches or more, and test the circuit - H-lights, Turn signals, etc until you're absolutely ready to terminate. If the circuits are grouped and tied-off with zip ties leave them on or put new ones back on if you have to remove them to route through the body shell.

Up under the dash, I leave the wire long on purpose. Sure it gets messy up under there with all that wire but that's why they make zip ties. Just make it as neat as possible and keep the groupings separate.

As a Harley guy, I learned the perils of crimping & then soldering terminals. A soldered terminal is certainly more secure but it also is a set-up for failure where vibration is a concern if not addressed properly. The wire will becomes stiff where the solder wicks up the wire strands and if left unsupported i.e. able to move at all, it will flex, flex, flex and eventually break at that point where the solder stops and the strands continue on. If you have a good crimping tool and you know how to crimp properly, solder is not necessary. Proper crimping requires the insulation to be captured inside the terminal as well as the twisted strands. Don't over-crimp. Again, a good crimping tool will stop before it over-crimps.

Cover with shrink wrap or electrical tape or similar insulating material as much of the terminal as possible. this will reduce exposure and therefore degradation/deterioration from the elements.

One more tip....USE GROMMETS! Do not let the insulated wire rest or sharply turn across a metal edge or surface without either a grommet or some rubber covering. It'll be fine for a year or maybe even two but then....ZAP! Blew that fuse!

BTW, I was glad to see you bought AAW over Painless. I installed a full Painless harness and I think it's fair to say, an Installer should have some automotive electrical experience/background with this product. I have no experience with AAW but it appears to be an easier install from what I have read here on SNS.

You've got Custom Jim and a few others with good knowledge following along so, don't be afraid to ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Thanks for the solid tips! All things I'm noting and keeping in mind. Will acquire some grommets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts

I wound up buying an assorted kit like above and it has a multitude of sizes. Worked quite well when I re-wired my car. I used an painless universal kit and had never wired before. Like all have said take your time read the instructions many times and lay the harness out prior and route everything before cutting anything. Much to my surprise all worked, no hiccups at all but it took me awhile. Good soldering gun, good crimpers and a lot of patience. You'll do fine.
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top