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Discussion Starter #1
Well i just changed my outer tie rod ends. Before I removed them, I measured from the edge of the adjuster sleeve to the center of the stud on the end of the tie rod. I also counted the turns it took to remove the piece. I replaced each side one at a time and counted the turns and checked the measurements to get it back to close to where it was before. Well, afterwards I pulled it out of the garage and started to test ride it, and noticed something definitly wasnt right. Looking from the front the wheels appear to toe outwards. I cant figure out why now? Like I said, I measured prior to, and after insatallation.:confused:
Now what? One thing that did catch my eye was that one of the old tie rods was slightly bent. I dont know why, but the new ones are both straight. Could someone have aligned it with a bent rod, and now with the new one being straight, maybe thats causing my problem?? Whats the best way to get the wheels working parallell to each other, to get it close before a proper alignment? Thanks
 

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Yes they can align it with bent parts. The best way to do this at home is put a stick against each wheel parallel to the ground (someone will need to hold them and measure the front and measure at the rear and adjust accordingly with the steering wheel centered and locked.

Hope that makes sense, toe out makes for poor driving too!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How is the adjustment made? I never done this before(obviously). Do I undo the outer end and turn it in or out of the sleeve, or is the adjustment made from the sleeve, which is where Im thinking its done? If so, just how is it done? Thanks!
 

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Just rotate/turn the sleeves while they're loose, don't tighten them until you're done, they're a bear to do after you lock them. The sleeves will make any adjustment you need for toe. There is a tool to turn the sleeves after they've been tightened up, but I've used vise grips without over tightening them to do the job.

I think up or clock wise on the pass side will give you toe in from the back side, I can't remember if the driver side is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Taz. Just one more Q. Should the weight of the car be on the tires when doing these adjustments, or partially jacked up to make the weight less, to make the adjustment a little easier? To me, it seems the measuring would be different if the car is raised and tires off the ground.
 

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Probably easier all around if you make the adjustment with the car in the air, then drop it and see how it sits.

eyeball it close, then drive it to an alignment shop.
 

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Thanks Taz. Just one more Q. Should the weight of the car be on the tires when doing these adjustments, or partially jacked up to make the weight less, to make the adjustment a little easier? To me, it seems the measuring would be different if the car is raised and tires off the ground.
The adjustment is easy with full weight on the wheels!
Put the full weight on the wheels and try to squeeze under, (it not too bad) I know it can be a pain, but your adjustment will be incorrect if you lift the car at all. You want it as level as possible. Drag racers will jack the car up a couple inches then set it, because that's how they go down the track and there is less rolling resistance. I fit, but I'm a small guy!:D

NPHNP!:yes: anything else just ask.
 

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After I got my steering centered, I just measured front and back of rotors with a tape measure and adjusted till they were equal. The tape slides in nice and straight at the rotors, so i'm getting accurate numbers. Not sure how precise this method is but it sure looks good to me....at least for now till i get it on the ground. Then I'll take another look. or two, or three.
 
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