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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
Got a line on a 400 block I intend to use for a future build to a 406/408.

Here's what am thinking.
New crank
forged rods and pistons
retro fit for hyd rollers

BUt then switch the rest over from the fastburn ZZ4
Fastburn heads which have been massaged already
Lunati 60122 cam- 231/239 @ 050, 535/550 lift
RPM air gap and Prosystems carb
plus the MSD ignition and Hedman shorties
Coan 10", 4000 stall
4.10 gears
plus the NOS powershot kit I just got as well

While perhaps not an optimum set up seems that the extra 50+ cubes would really make this combo a TQ monster on the street.
I can build this motor cheap by using the above parts which are already on the car.

Pros and cons?
 

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Sounds like it would work well, but with such a small cam, I don't think you need a 4000 converter. Dale's 406 had a 230° hyd. flat tappet cam, with a real tight converter and 3.08's went 12.12/114. Had a dual plane intake and Street Avenger 770 vac. sec.
 

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I too would look at running a bit more cam, but if you've already got it......RUN IT!!:yes:

A little port work in the heads and intake would really be beneficial as well!! You gotta feed them extra cubes!!!:devil:
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Sounds like it would work well, but with such a small cam, I don't think you need a 4000 converter. Dale's 406 had a 230° hyd. flat tappet cam, with a real tight converter and 3.08's went 12.12/114. Had a dual plane intake and Street Avenger 770 vac. sec.
Got any suggestions on a cam? Id be open to it. New cam and lifters dont cost that much in the grand scheme. Or could toss on 1.6 rockers for more lift.

and your hesitating because??????????:rolleyes::rolleyes::D:D
LOL not hesitiating at all. Plans are to pick up this weekend!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
stuff

I don't like shorty headers, and what cc are the combustion chambers in those fast burn heads
Id prefer long tube headers as well but these were the only ones made specifically for these newer heads at the time of purchase.

CC's are either 62 or 64, forget which.
Hope it isnt an issue would like to keep compression under 11-1.
 

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Got any suggestions on a cam?
It would depend on how the heads flow--might just leave it as is, I just don't think you need that much converter yet- but then, I use my same 8" 6000 rpm converter with any engine I stick in my car!

Hope it isnt an issue would like to keep compression under 11-1.
It will require a dished or inverted dome piston to stay under 11-1 with the small chambers. 10.8-1 with 64cc and a typical flat top piston. 10.3-1 with a D-shaped dish piston.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Fastburn flow

Here's what I have on published flow for the fastburn heads. Mine have been cleaned up and a multi angle valve job done so should be a bit better. 62cc chambers change the comp equation some, just want to stay pump gas friendly.

Chamber Size 62cc
Intake Runner 210cc
Exhaust Runner 78cc
Flow Int/Exh @

0.100 62/55
0.200 136/104
0.300 187/133
0.400 232/158
0.500 266/180
0.600 275/193
 

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You may want to look into a Dart SHP or similar block. If your 400 block needs to be fully machined you can spend a few hundred more and get the Dart block. The stock 400 block should be fine with the combo your planing, but if you ever decide to step it up in the heads and cam department you'll have the extra piece of mind there. And since you allready have a 400 block you could sell it to recoupe the rest of the difference.

Sure there are plenty of guys using the chevy 400 blocks in high HP applications without trouble (me included), but anything over 550 HP or 7000 RPMs or heavy doses of nitrous is a crap shoot whether or not the block is going to stay together. If I was starting from scratch I think I'd go with an aftermarket block.

http://www.dartshp.com/shpblocks.html

John.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
****$

You may want to look into a Dart SHP or similar block. If your 400 block needs to be fully machined you can spend a few hundred more and get the Dart block. The stock 400 block should be fine with the combo your planing, but if you ever decide to step it up in the heads and cam department you'll have the extra piece of mind there. And since you allready have a 400 block you could sell it to recoupe the rest of the difference.

Sure there are plenty of guys using the chevy 400 blocks in high HP applications without trouble (me included), but anything over 550 HP or 7000 RPMs or heavy doses of nitrous is a crap shoot whether or not the block is going to stay together. If I was starting from scratch I think I'd go with an aftermarket block.

http://www.dartshp.com/shpblocks.html

John.
I thought about going this route but its doubtful I'll ever go to those levels of performance. While I love to build a 421 or 434 stroker it's not in the planning for a looong time.
 

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To keep it around 11.0:1, you will have to go with a piston with a dish/ valve relief volume of 12 cc. That will put you right at 10.92.1 with a .030 overbore. But it could be a little more or less depending on the quench distance and the actual size of the Combustion Chambers.

-Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks

As long as keeping her pump gas friendly is do-able. Know there are some on here running high compression with pump gas but truthfully dont understand how they do it. Never really saw it explained clearly enough I guess.
 

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As long as keeping her pump gas friendly is do-able. Know there are some on here running high compression with pump gas but truthfully dont understand how they do it. Never really saw it explained clearly enough I guess.
A LOOSE converter and plenty gear to keep the low RPM load off the engine is paramount. Then there's the BIG cams, tight quench, removal of all of the sharp edges from the pistons/cylinder heads, and a KILLER tune!:yes:

Even then, it's not for the faint-of-heart.:no:
 

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You may want to look into a Dart SHP or similar block. If your 400 block needs to be fully machined you can spend a few hundred more and get the Dart block. The stock 400 block should be fine with the combo your planing, but if you ever decide to step it up in the heads and cam department you'll have the extra piece of mind there. And since you allready have a 400 block you could sell it to recoupe the rest of the difference.

Sure there are plenty of guys using the chevy 400 blocks in high HP applications without trouble (me included), but anything over 550 HP or 7000 RPMs or heavy doses of nitrous is a crap shoot whether or not the block is going to stay together. If I was starting from scratch I think I'd go with an aftermarket block.

http://www.dartshp.com/shpblocks.html

John.
:yes::yes: I have no regrets with my 400 SHP block.
 

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Combo suggestions:

This piston: http://www.cnc-motorsports.com/product.asp?ProdID=16101&CtgID=16044

This rod: http://www.cnc-motorsports.com/product.asp?ProdID=14116&CtgID=14112

This crank: Ohio Crankshaft 44003800 4340 SBC 400 mains, 3.800" stroke $495


These parts will give you 414" without any trick one-off parts or block clearancing. The only problem is the compression would be about 12-1.
KB has a hypereutectic piston that would give you about 10.5-1, but some people are afraid of those pistons-I'm not.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
me neither

Hypers are concerning me less and less as I get beter read on the subject.
Besides my small shot of nitrous isnt going to kill them unless I do something really stupid.

Thanks for the info bowtie, Im making the road trip tomorrow for the block. He actually has 2 and is willing to cut a deal if I take both. One a 4-bolt main, comes with SpeedPro .030 flattop pistons mounted on GM 5.7 rods with SPS bolts. The other is a bare 2 bolt main block. Neither has been bored yet if I understand correctly. But I'll be taking my dial calipers along to check any way.
 

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A LOOSE converter and plenty gear to keep the low RPM load off the engine is paramount. Then there's the BIG cams, tight quench, removal of all of the sharp edges from the pistons/cylinder heads, and a KILLER tune!:yes:

Even then, it's not for the faint-of-heart.:no:
Exactly. I can see going through all of this and constantly changing the tune based on weather and condition if it was mainly a race setup. But for a weekend warrior that sees mostly street time, I would just keep the compression lower. You might loose 5-10% power but it would be easier to enjoy IMO.

Keeping the compression around 10.5-10.8:1 would give you some room for error. You still want to set everything up correctly and as perfect as you can, but the tune wouldnt have to be perfect all the time. After all, pump gas changes every day. Just like women.:rolleyes:

-Dan
 

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I can see going through all of this and constantly changing the tune based on weather and condition if it was mainly a race setup
I rarely change anything unless it's broken--most of the time my hood stays closed.
 
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