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here is the situation. I have a 75 nova that im working on. i have a 383 block setting on the stand and ready to start ordering parts. I have a 454 from a 89 Suburban, Complete carb to pan. The BB runs good uses no oil, no blowby, no problems. Spring is coming on quick and the first test n tune is march 30th. i dont think I can get the 383 done in time. My question is, with a fresh set of rings, bearings, cam and lifters (any suggestions) aluminum intake and carb, headers 3:73 and a new set of aluminum heads (pro comp i think) from a buddy of mine. This is needed to be a 50-50 street strip car as I would like to use it on and off the track. Does anyone know the pros and cons of the 454 engine? What kind of times would i be looking at? i know im not going to be running 5's in the 8th but just a general idea. All steel body with 8 point bars and frame connectors, 275/60's. Anyone used a newer model block? Any problems I need to be aware of. Thanks for any info yall can give me.

 

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Heavy car, smogger low compression very low horse engine, pro comp heads.........

I'd say that if you're not running a points series where every point matters, I'd wait till the small block was done.

Or find a better temporary candidate.

The time and money that you're going to put into an engine that isn't going to do too much would be much better spent on that small block you're building.
 

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With the right combination of parts, converter, and Drag Radials or slicks you could probably get some 7.30's - 7.50's out of the car.

Your big block is equipped with flat-top pistons. With the large combustion chamber volume in the Pro Comp heads, the amount of piston below deck at TDC, and the average Fel-Pro or similar head gasket your static compression ratio is going to end up around 7.8:1. Couple that with the relatively large intake runner volume in the Pro Comp heads and you end up with an engine that does not generate sufficient torque and that does not really breath well at any RPM.

If you really wanted to make the big block work then you'd be better off sourcing a set of early GM oval port closed chamber heads, preferably something in the 90 - 95cc range. While closed chamber heads don't flow quite as well as an open chamber head, the increase in static compression ratio will be worth the trade-off, and torque production will improve significantly. Depending on final chamber volume you could end up with an effective static compression in the 9.2:1 to 9.8:1 range. Install a Performer RPM intake manifold, a 1" open carb spacer, a 4150-based 750 carburetor, a dual pattern hydraulic or solid camshaft (240's/250's @ .050", mid-.500" lift, 108 - 110 LSA, 104 - 106 ICL), and some 1-3/4" or 1-7/8" headers. Combine that with a torque converter that flashes in the 3,000 - 3,500 RPM range and you'll have a combination that will probably surprise you in terms of performance, will be deadly consistent for bracket racing, and will still provide outstanding street driving characteristics.

If the engine has good cranking compression then I wouldn't waste the time or money on re-ringing it. I'd drop the pan, install a 1-piece oil pump driveshaft, and put it back together with the parts listed above. You won't have any surprises using the '89 block. It will be plenty durable.

If you decide to go with the Pro Comps and a big single plane intake manifold then you're going to need a nitrous plate to make that thing run, because it will be a slug on the motor alone.
 

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:)
With the right combination of parts, converter, and Drag Radials or slicks you could probably get some 7.30's - 7.50's out of the car.

Your big block is equipped with flat-top pistons. With the large combustion chamber volume in the Pro Comp heads, the amount of piston below deck at TDC, and the average Fel-Pro or similar head gasket your static compression ratio is going to end up around 7.8:1. Couple that with the relatively large intake runner volume in the Pro Comp heads and you end up with an engine that does not generate sufficient torque and that does not really breath well at any RPM.

If you really wanted to make the big block work then you'd be better off sourcing a set of early GM oval port closed chamber heads, preferably something in the 90 - 95cc range. While closed chamber heads don't flow quite as well as an open chamber head, the increase in static compression ratio will be worth the trade-off, and torque production will improve significantly. Depending on final chamber volume you could end up with an effective static compression in the 9.2:1 to 9.8:1 range. Install a Performer RPM intake manifold, a 1" open carb spacer, a 4150-based 750 carburetor, a dual pattern hydraulic or solid camshaft (240's/250's @ .050", mid-.500" lift, 108 - 110 LSA, 104 - 106 ICL), and some 1-3/4" or 1-7/8" headers. Combine that with a torque converter that flashes in the 3,000 - 3,500 RPM range and you'll have a combination that will probably surprise you in terms of performance, will be deadly consistent for bracket racing, and will still provide outstanding street driving characteristics.

If the engine has good cranking compression then I wouldn't waste the time or money on re-ringing it. I'd drop the pan, install a 1-piece oil pump driveshaft, and put it back together with the parts listed above. You won't have any surprises using the '89 block. It will be plenty durable.

If you decide to go with the Pro Comps and a big single plane intake manifold then you're going to need a nitrous plate to make that thing run, because it will be a slug on the motor alone.
:):yes: This is exactlty what we did with the sons 86 Monte Carlo,but a Quadrajet race preped& 2" Headers.3.73 /2500 stall. No subsitute for cubes!
 
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