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Since I have seen a lot of people talk about putting on an aftermarket power booster and with the way the brackets fit, it would cause people to use the upper hole in the brake pedal, which is incorrect for a PB setup. Because of leverage ratios, for PB you need to use the lower hole.

When the booster is mounted, it would line up the push rod with the upper hole and when trying to use the lower hole, it would create a bad angle that would cause binding. Having seen the below method used on other aftermaket setups in the past, I decided to build an offset bracket to correct the angle and allow the lower hole to be used.

1" wide by 5/8" thick flat steel. More than strong enough. 3/8" hole drilled with a 2" spacing, same as the brake pedal hole spacing.


The original clevis and adjusting adapter mounted to my bracket


Mounted in the car. Booster push rod is straight and I was able to use the correct, lower hole.


Did it make a difference, yep it sure did. Before the pedal would go much lower than it should and it did not create enough force to do a hard stop or even lock up any wheels. Now the pedal feel and travel feels like it should and if I really get on it, I can lock up the front wheels evenly.

Hope this helps anyone else out there that is using the wrong hole for their power brake booster.
 

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If you use the right booster and install it in the right holes in the firewall it lines up properly.
What you have made looks like it can put the wrong force on the booster rod and may bend someday and or snap.
If you look how the rods are designed the are setup to take the forces straight on.
Modifying that rod like that is crazy.

I moved my booster up 2 inches years ago to clear tall valve covers but what I did was tilt the booster at the firewall like on a 3rd gen this lined up the rod with the lower hole.

PLEASE don't take my reply bad I just feel the need to speak up when someone puts my safety at risk.:eek::cool:
 

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If you use the right booster and install it in the right holes in the firewall it lines up properly.
What you have made looks like it can put the wrong force on the booster rod and may bend someday and or snap.
If you look how the rods are designed the are setup to take the forces straight on.
Modifying that rod like that is crazy.

I moved my booster up 2 inches years ago to clear tall valve covers but what I did was tilt the booster at the firewall like on a 3rd gen this lined up the rod with the lower hole.

PLEASE don't take my reply bad I just feel the need to speak up when someone puts my safety at risk.:eek::cool:

to be honest... i have to agree with David on this one. it may LOOK safe, but in an emergency stop the stud (or something) can break and then you're screwed... no, sorry... i don't like what you did... :no:
 

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I feel the same way as David and Johnny. The lower part looks like the weakest link. It was never intended to be mounted that way. In an accident where the brakes fail, the insurance company would likely bail out if they found the cause to be linkage. I'd re-think the setup. An engineer in the automotive braking mechanics would be a good source to seek advice.
 

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there are no stress/sheer-geometric issues with the kit you posted Shane,... the unit Mike did, in an emergency situation it could break at the coupler/stud area. the forces are directed wrong...
 

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Yeah I'm with them. The ones you showed links to have pivots where yours is hard fixed and could cause odd side loads on parts that were not designed to have loads like that.

Miles
 
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