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Well I finally got to start my car with the fresh cam installed and had it running for 5 mins during break in and the oil line ruptured spraying oil onto the header and ignited. I will have to look to see how bad the damage is but I do know nothing serious tho I got it out right away. I know I need a new oil line and some wires for harness but not sure yet how much wire. TIP: DONT NOT RUN PLASTIC OIL LINE FOR YOUR OIL GAUGE!!!! I now have a new copper line so this does not happen again.
 

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Glad to hear you got it out. I stopped using the plastic ones years ago when one broke behind my dash while driving to work and covered the front interior with a high preasure oil mist. It was every where. Had to call in sick to work, pick up a 12er, pick 1 friend, and clean, clean, clean. Would have called for more help but not enough cleaning supplies to go around.:D
 

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Glad to at least hear it doesn't seem serious. I picked up an elect. gauge this time around. I guess I wanted to try an electric one because of that very issue, afraid of a break / crack and leaking everywhere. Didn't think about maybe on header tho!
 

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Glad to at least hear it doesn't seem serious. I picked up an elect. gauge this time around. I guess I wanted to try an electric one because of that very issue, afraid of a break / crack and leaking everywhere. Didn't think about maybe on header tho!
Same here, the electric gauges are just as accurate, easier to install and no chance of oil spraying everywhere. The carpet in the El Camino needs replaced due to an oil line leak.

The Nascar cup cars run electric gauges and those engines cost more than mine.
 

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Sorry to hear about the damage.

Copper is not the fix all. It has a tendency to crack due to vibration. Keep an eye on it too. I'm with the others, electrical is the way to go.
 

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Thanks guys. Well I went through everything and only two wires were burned, elec fan and the tach wire which are fixed and of course the oil line was melted away which was the cause of the fire. All is fixed and finished breaking in the new cam today. I am very happy now and she sounds great!!
 

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It could have been a lot worse, glad it wasn't.

Your problem made me think that an electrical mishap could be just as bad.

I am inspecting every wire under the hood. The wiring is 32 years old and hiding inside the factory plastic tubing where anything wrong would be hidden from view.
 

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Glad to hear your alright. Breaking in cams always makes me nervious. Especialy in a fresh restoration! Its funny to think that the factory used plastic pressure tubes. But they didi'nt have headers though. so less heat.
I use electric sending units unless its a nut/ bolt correct restoration then it gets oem plastic and is very carefully routed.
 

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Check the main feed for the car. It comes from the battery terminal on the starter, into the main harness where it is spliced and ran out to power the alternator, the ignition switch and high blower on AC cars. Even on non AC cars there is a red wire attached to the firewall not feeding anything. Today the harness on the 77 was removed from the convoluted tubing and inspected. I also made some modifications to do the change over from a 6 to the V8 and run wires for the Autometer gauges.

This photo was taken of a 75 without AC. You can see the 5 wires connected together. It is a soldered connection, I want to make sure it is insulated well.

 

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Phillip; I always cut that mess of a splice out of any older Chevy I buy, sometimes you get to them and the wires are not even soldered, just crimped and loosely at that. I'll cut that splice out and move it all to a terminal post or some kind of more secure connection. Older Chevy S-10 Blazers used to have a nice terminal post block that can be found in just about any junkyard that makes a good terminal post.

The plastic oil line isn't legal at tracks, I found that out by a sharp tech inspector one time. He let me go that night but after he explained what could happen I never used the plastic again. It's a good rule, right now I'm using a copper line to my oil pressure gauge but I think I'm going to change it to a flex braided line. The solid copper line turns the gauge into a speaker. You hear every little tick or noise the motor is making and it drives you crazy cruising around. Next time, I'm with you, get senders, easier to deal with.
 

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That sounds like a good idea, the wires are long enough to reach a junction point on firewall. This harness, unlike a few others I have seen is still in good shape. In the past I have found wires that the insulation was hard and if flexed would split and leave the copper exposed.
 

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That's because that splice is the dumbest thing I've ever seen from GM. Works to get a car through warranty then goes to crap. The splice is a major resistance point. Anything that causes resistance also causes heat of course, the wire ends near the splice heat up from the resistance, get brittle, corrode, start making "iffy" connection and everything starts to go dim in the car, lights, dash lights, voltage suffers around the vehicle blah, blah, blah...

It's just a really stupid idea to crimp all those wires together without some kind of SOLID connection point. Even solder breaks down after a few years in the harsh undehood environment, then the connection is only as good as the crimp.
 
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