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Discussion Starter #1
Well, in the process of putting a patch in the footwell are of the wagon, I overlap welded one side (along the door seem) and buttwelded one side (along the back side), but on the transmission tunnel and on the bottom part of the firewall, my cutting was "less percise" and the gap various.
Sometimes it is "butted together" or 1/16 gap and other times the gap various out to 1/8 or 1/4 inch.

On some of the closer spots, I tried to "bridge" the gap with a weld, but most of the time, the weld just "fell through" and didn't bridge or just made a larger hole. (arrggg !!)

I have heard of people using copper as a backing due to it will not stick to the weld.

Other then trying to cut 1/16 strips to fill the gap, what other options would you all use?

I thought about using the copper as a backing or using some nail shafts as a "filler" ???

(and here I though that the floors would be a good learning process, but with all the curves, bends and contours that sometimes match adn other times don't, this is turning into an ordeal !!)

:)
-Brent Thomas
Ohio
 

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I have bridged 1/16 gaps on floors but 1/8 is tough. You can do it if they are short gaps. Angle the torch to about 45 degrees and just touch the trigger so you get a spot weld sort of. Give it a sec to cool and hit it again. I am a decent welder but I stitch gaps pretty well doing that. If they are 1/8 gaps and long I cut a 1/4 in strip and weld both sides using the same stich method. If you really screw up I would flange the spacer piece and lay it on top of one side and under the other if that makes sense. I saved a quarter panel for a guy who cut it short that way. Came out OK on that so a floor should do great. RM
 

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If you get a piece of brass to use as a backup behind the gap it will help support the area as you weld. It requires two people to do. You can also use a wire or small bar stock as a filler. Weld the bar stock along the gap kind as McCoy suggested with the strap. I have saw my dad use two welding rods at the same time to fill large gags. You can strike an arc and feed in another rod like wleding with a torch. It takes two steady hads to do that trick.
 

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As a beginner welder, I had better luck using a filler piece on the large gaps. I can close a 1/16 gap okay and 1/8 if it is a short length but for anything else, I used a filler piece of scrap and some careful grinding. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, I'll have to post some pics too.

I also considered buying some .35 wire since I am using .24 to see if that helps "fill" the gap better ?!

Last night for grins, I placed a jack and a 4x6 under the pan and wanted to see if I could get the pan to move a little closer together...

The whole car (on dollie) lifted about an inch off the ground !! :eek: :eek:
I quickly let the car back down and figured that wasn't gonna happen !!! :)

-Brent Thomas
 

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If you use the heavier wire (0.035") you will have to run more amps and that will cause you to burn through the thin gauge metal all the more easily. Stick with the small wire, it's easier to control on the thinner metal. Just my 2 cents. I good rule of thumb to remember is that the panel gaps should be less than the thickness of the metal you are trying to weld when doing butt welds. Believe me, I made the same exatc mistake you made in a few places on my floor pans......ended up using a filler panel.
Ron
 

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Ron's right, the heavier .035 wire will create more problems. Pick up
a few sticks of tig wire in various sizes, 1/16, 3/32, and 1/8 ER70S.
Lay the appropriate size in the gap, and weld over it with your mig.
This is he same type of filler rod your using in your wire machine. Using
brass to back up the weld is a good tip, just hard to position it sometimes.

Check the wire type in your machines, if you are using ER70S-2, try
switching to ER70-6 which is formulated to burn better with old metal
that has rust impregnated in it. This still means the metal should be as
clean as possible! This wire flows better, and will produce a better
looking weld. This applys to tig also.

Good luck, Rich
 
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