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Recently converted my 68 to front discs. I had to order a matching master cylinder from strange to have the right pressures to run these brakes. Only problem is strange doesnt make a direct fit for my car. Not sure where to go from here cause its way off, i dont think i could engineer it to work. Thinking i might have to go with a completely different pedal or master cylinder.

Has anyone else ever had this happen? Where can i get a pedal to fit the master cylinder? Is there any high output master cylinders out there thats a direct fit?

Strange master cylinder PN STRB3359
 

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Longer Rod

I do not know what problem you are describing, but when switching from drum to disc it is common to buy or make a longer push rod, from the pedal to the end of the inside of the master cylinder. You want a little play from the end of the rod to the inside end of the master cylinder, 1/8" to 3/16", you do not want the rod to be bottomed out in the cylinder when you are not pushing on the pedal. The return spring must disengage such contact.
As they are so often necessary, new rods are available from numerous sources,
including Strange. I made the rod I am using from a 3/8" grade 5 hardware store bolt. Used the threads on the bolt to attach it to the fitting on the brake pedal, double-nutted it and cut the shank to fit into the master cylinder.
 

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From what I can see this master cylinder should bolt right up to your firewall.

If it has a deep pushrod cup (and it probably does) your manual brake pushrod should work.

Thing is, if you don't have a booster, a 1.125" bore master cylinder is too big for most disc brake calipers. If you have GM calipers, you should use a 1" bore master cylinder. If you have aftermarket calipers, you may need even smaller.

Note that a smaller bore diameter on the master cylinder will make more line pressure for a given push on the pedal. The pedal stroke will increase.

If you have GM calipers, an original replacement master cylinder that you can buy at an auto supply will work just fine.
 

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Not sure of the problem but pedals usually have two holes for the pushrod to attach to. An upper one closer to the pivot for manual brakes and a lower one for power brakes.
 

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The "strange" m/c is basically a mopar OEM unit; my guess it's from the same factory.
I have a mopar m/c on my car and the only problem is the mounting studs on the firewall don't match the holes of the m/c. You can slightly elongate the holes of the m/c to match the wider ctc dimension of the mounting studs. Dosen't take much with a die grinder or even a round file.
I had to make a longer push rod. i noticed that the pn you posted includes a push rod, maybe it will work out.
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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Not sure of the problem but pedals usually have two holes for the pushrod to attach to. An upper one closer to the pivot for manual brakes and a lower one for power brakes.
Yep, it seems to be about the MC to pedal connection and I would venture to say it has to do with which hole is being used. I have never seen a 3rd gen pedal with one hole? If there were 2 holes it would be obvious which one to use. The angle of the rod entering the car is much steeper with power brakes vs. manual being more horizontal to the pedal. Also you can skip the return spring as well. It is not needed and will not line up either.
 
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