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Funny, I was just looking at the vette he has for sale then came on here and saw this link.

I wouldnt buy any of those cars for any amount of money :rolleyes:
 

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n8. said:
I wouldnt buy any of those cars for any amount of money :rolleyes:
Why not? As a project those would be the easiest. They were very nice before they got flooded, so most of the work on them would be cleanup. I would freshen the engine/trans/rearend on any of them. There will be some electrical components that will need replaced, but, when you buy any other project, what all has to be done? engine/trans/rearend, Some electrical, replace some parts etc. But you also usually have lots of body and paint work to do.

Randy (cleaning is easy!);)
 

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Man I dont know. There was alot of toxic stuff in that water that just wont clean up. On top of that all the salt is supposedly eating them up at a much faster pace. I know Ford is scraping all their new vehicles that where flooded down their because of those same reasons. All the VIN's are recorded and if any show up down the road they are going hunting for some heads to roll.
 
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:( :awkward:
NIIN20 said:
Man I dont know. There was alot of toxic stuff in that water that just wont clean up. On top of that all the salt is supposedly eating them up at a much faster pace. I know Ford is scraping all their new vehicles that where flooded down their because of those same reasons. All the VIN's are recorded and if any show up down the road they are going hunting for some heads to roll.
Exactly...

I might buy one after 3 years, only if I know the salt has done minimum damage.

If it looks good after that amount of time, I might invest.

In the next few years, those things are gonna rot like rotten eggs.
 

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Leaving the salt in there for 3 years is going to do the damage. If you get it out now, the damage will be minimalized. They have also far less salt than any car on the road in any place that salts roads in the winter.

Toxic stuff?? Ain't nuttin' a lil' formula 409 won't clean right off!!:rolleyes:

Randy (and some Brawny paper towels!):D
 
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If I had the time/money, I think the vette would be a good/smart investment

If you have the money, buy one of them, spend a bit of cash and you will come out on top!:D :D :D -Nathan
 

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You have to give the seller credit, he is listing them as Katrina flooded vehicles and not just restoring them and flipping them.
 

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I wouldn't want one of those cars if they gave it to me...IMO you will NEVER be able to remove all of the salt and other crap that flooded those cars short of having the body of the car dipped...that might work...but unless you have that option there is no way for you to get the crap out of all the frame rails and closed/sealed compartments that cars have...way too much work would be involved with these projects only to see them rott away....

These cars would need more than a clean up...all new interior as the mold would have already began in the foam parts of the seats, all new wiring, as the corrosion would have already began, complete strip/dip of the body..preferably the dip, as the corrosion would for sure have started, complete drivetrain rebuild as again the corrosion would have began internally on these parts...the list goes on and on...run away from any of these cars as they say "Rust NEVER Sleeps" and these cars will continue to rot long after someone has tried to "clean" them up...they are not worth anything except for their scrap value IMO.:)
 

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Living on the east coast and driving the beach I've had the oportunity to see quite a few people get trucks stuck and the tide submerge them. Trust me when I say you wouldn't want anything thats had a salt water bath. Glass, rubber, and plastic survive, but metal will be gone in a year no matter What you do to it.
 

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Igosplut said:
Living on the east coast and driving the beach I've had the oportunity to see quite a few people get trucks stuck and the tide submerge them. Trust me when I say you wouldn't want anything thats had a salt water bath. Glass, rubber, and plastic survive, but metal will be gone in a year no matter What you do to it.
Years ago a buddies sister parked her three year old Mustang on the Beach to "hear the music better".She got it stuck, tide came in.We stripped that car down,worked on it for a couple of weeks,had to rewire etc.,etc. She kept the car for about a month and then traded it in.
 

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One of our body shop industry newsletters had reports of diseases from the flood cars.
It reported a fireman died from a minor cut while extracting someone from a flood car that had been resold up north.
I don't remember the disease, something to do with the bloodstream.
 

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NIIN20 said:
Man I dont know. There was alot of toxic stuff in that water that just wont clean up. On top of that all the salt is supposedly eating them up at a much faster pace. I know Ford is scraping all their new vehicles that where flooded down their because of those same reasons. All the VIN's are recorded and if any show up down the road they are going hunting for some heads to roll.
Heard one of the insurers (Progressive?) is totalling and will be destroying all flood cars. Not sure if they followed thru, but it makes sense. With salt getting into and destroying major body components, I wouldn't want to be in a salt water flood car during a major accident.

Has anyone ever seen a rocker panel fold in half during a head-on collision?
 

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NIIN20 said:
You heard correct! There are piles of cars down there on top of piles of other stuff going thru the shreadders. A buddy just came back from down there and couldnt believe what he saw.
Did he get any photos?
 

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OMG. My brother worked with these guys up to about a month ago. We saw alot of very nice cars go through. From the pics, they cleaned up pretty good after alot of detailing time. I was shocked at the prices that where paid for a very large lot of muscle, classic, and hot rods that they bought, and I see profits are good. I really liked a T-bucket they had, and wonder how much it will go for if it has not been sold yet. I though to myself that I would have loved to have gotten some of the cars at the auction when I first saw them getting cleaned, but after reading your other post, maybe it is not a great idea. :eek: I did not know saltwater caused so much permanent damage.
 
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