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Discussion Starter #1
and its WAYY more fubar then i thought it was.

Is there ANYTHING i can do to fix this thing or is it trash?












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I am with Bowtie on this one. It would be cheaper just to buy another one
 

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just get a new one bro instead of fixing that piece of crap might as well get a new one, you dont know what kind of problems that one will give you if u were to fix it , to many cracks and chips
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I know a few guys who can TIG. Ill see if they wont help me out.

If not i am going with the torker on my 307 build. :yes:
 

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Sometimes those intake castings are really pourous and even TIG welding will yield so-so results in building up material (better suited for repairing cracks, and even then it's tough). If the manifold has sentimental value, or you're dead set on using it, you might have better luck with using epoxy.
 

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Is that kind of damage normal? Water and antifreeze should do that?
 

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What kind of media did they use?The right kind of media shouldn't have done that?bm
 

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What kind of media did they use?The right kind of media shouldn't have done that?bm
Just a regular box sand blaster. done by my dad..took him 5 minutes

it was already pretty bad before he did it...so i doubt he messed it up...
 

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Just a regular box sand blaster. done by my dad..took him 5 minutes

it was already pretty bad before he did it...so i doubt he messed it up...
What pressure was used? I never use sand to clean cast aluminum. I normally use glass bead at around 30 psi. You'd be surprised how much material is removed by sand blasting even new aluminum castings.
 

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Sometimes those intake castings are really pourous and even TIG welding will yield so-so results in building up material (better suited for repairing cracks, and even then it's tough). If the manifold has sentimental value, or you're dead set on using it, you might have better luck with using epoxy.

I agree with Vince, trying to weld on that is just going to make it worse. I've repaired a couple with good 'ol JB weld. You'll have to do it in several stages which will take a couple of days.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I agree with Vince, trying to weld on that is just going to make it worse. I've repaired a couple with good 'ol JB weld. You'll have to do it in several stages which will take a couple of days.
thats what i was just thinkin:D
 

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that looks like it was used in a saltwater motor. the salt will corrode the aluminum in the water jackets.
 

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I would buy another intake rather than spend time and money on that one. I recently purchased a perfect used Performer RPM on Craigslist for $50.00, I'll bet you would spend more $ than that to repair the damage.
Bill
 

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What kind of media did they use?The right kind of media shouldn't have done that?bm
Hey Bruce,

I don't think it was the media that did that. It's corroded away. That is sometimes a problem with using aluminum manifolds with iron blocks. You can buy small anodes that hang in your radiator that will slowly scarafice themselves so your aluminum parts don't. Home water heaters have these anode rods as well. Once the anode rods are eaten away, the water heater starts being eaten. The main difference in a 10 year warrantied water heater and one with a 5 year warranty is the size of the anodes they install.
Ron
 

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Hey Bruce,

I don't think it was the media that did that. It's corroded away. That is sometimes a problem with using aluminum manifolds with iron blocks. You can buy small anodes that hang in your radiator that will slowly scarafice themselves so your aluminum parts don't. Home water heaters have these anode rods as well. Once the anode rods are eaten away, the water heater starts being eaten. The main difference in a 10 year warrantied water heater and one with a 5 year warranty is the size of the anodes they install.
Ron
I have an anode in my radiator...to protect my intake and afr heads.I still wouldn't have used sand on aluminum...he should have used glass or walnuts...sand is way too aggressive(good on steel).bm
 
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