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Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in buying a gauge to monitor my A/F ratio and I just need a bit of advice on what's good. I've got Auto Meter Ultra-Lite gauges, so I was looking at this:

http://store.summitracing.com/partd...400442+4294822093+4294908392+115&autoview=sku

And the sensor and wiring here:

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=ATM-2244&N=0&autoview=sku

I don't know if that sensor is a wideband sensor or not, but can someone explain what that means? Wideband vs...narrowband (never heard that before, ;))?? Or if anyone has any recommendations on gauges/sensors, I'd appreciate that as well. I'd like to keep this whole thing under around $250, but if there's a big difference in reliability and/or accuracy, I'll go ahead and splurge on parts. :D

Anyway, thanks in advance.

Matt
 

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Wide band is the way to go. Along with the proper meter you can read A/F direct and accurately. The prices have come down quit a bit on this stuff but it's more expensive than the narrow band blinky light crap.

A regular Hego is only accurate at stoichometric (14.7 :1) and therefore only useful as a computer input.
I had a narrow band hego and the red/yellow green LED setup and it was just about as worthless as a stopped clock.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Paul. Summit's info isn't very helpful, but Autometer's site says that gauge won't work with wideband sensors. They do have a kit with an even better gauge (has the LED's arranged in a circular pattern AND a digital display for the numerical ratio), wideband Bosch sensor, and some other nice stuff for $379. Looks like I'll have to save up for a bit longer. :eek:

Matt
 

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wideband is definetly the way to go...i will recommend the innovate lm1 unit....keeping it under 250 is not gonna happen...about the least you will be looking to spend is 350 or so
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks new2novas. I checked out that Innovate product and it looks pretty awesome. All the stuff it comes with is really nice. I might actually go that route instead.

Matt
 

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Be advised, if you have used any gasket sealer on the engine that is not low volatile (sensor safe), the oxygen sensor will have a very short life. If you used regular clear silicon or blue silicone that is not sensor safe, get it out of there before you install this thing.
 

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tpinovaII said:
Be advised, if you have used any gasket sealer on the engine that is not low volatile (sensor safe), the oxygen sensor will have a very short life. If you used regular clear silicon or blue silicone that is not sensor safe, get it out of there before you install this thing.
Are you referring to around the sensor bung or on the motor in general?
 

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69NovaSS said:
Hey just remember a stopped clock is 100% accurate twice a day:rolleyes: :D :)
And that's why I used that comparison. A narrow band is only accurate at 14.7. Kudo's for remembering that, though.
 

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I was told that the O2 sensors had problems with leaded gas. From all these posts and no mention of this I am wondering if that is true. I was told that leaded gas coated the sensor or something and they would not work with leaded gas. Is that right? Thanks, RM
 

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Trbulnc said:
Are you referring to around the sensor bung or on the motor in general?
At the GM Tech Schools (in the 80's), they told us not to use it on engines with oxygen sensors at all. I have personally seen oxygen sensors fail due to using the wrong sealer on exhaust manifold gaskets. I suspect the wrong sealer on the intake side would also cause a problem. And keep in mind that the PCV valve draws vapor from the crankcase.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
69NovaSS said:
Hey just remember a stopped clock is 100% accurate twice a day:rolleyes: :D :)
:D

Real McCoy said:
I was told that the O2 sensors had problems with leaded gas. From all these posts and no mention of this I am wondering if that is true. I was told that leaded gas coated the sensor or something and they would not work with leaded gas. Is that right? Thanks, RM
I believe that's true. When I was at the Autometer site, both A/F gauges had notes that said not to use them with leaded fuel...

Matt
 

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In our shop we have used plenty of silicone (non sensor safe type) and we have never had an O2 sensor failure because of this. I've also heard that anti freeze will take em out.
 

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I found this post on another site that I go to and a guy there was asking about the sensor as well. This was one reply from a fella who has some experience with them. RM

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-I have an LM1 wideband and the rpm convertor wire harness that I have used twice at Bonneville.
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-We run some serious high powered ignition systems and I have found that MSD's and LM1's are NOT friends at all.
-I have two complete igniton systems that I can run one or the other or both at the same time and switch'm during a run.
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-So I was wanting a standalone trigger system that would trigger the LM1 regardless of which ignition system I was using at any instant----and I have found that is a real problem to figure out.
-Klaus at Innovate is real good at some stuff but he's never come up with a solution for me yet so I just quit asking.
-If you are interested in the LM1 be sure to be reading the forums at innovatemotorsports.com so that you can see the issues the customers all have.
-There is tons of information but there are many various issues that everybody seems to have.
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-For just using the LM1 as a air fuel meter that is easy---install the sensor on the side of the pipe where it doesn't get too hot and doesn't get too cool----plug the LM1 into the cig lighter---warm it up and go for a ride---it displays the a/f ratio.
-But to log the 6 channels takes a laptop and some knowledge of the software etc-----can't be really too bad because I figured it out.
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-I was trying to test the entire system in my shop where I was running my ignition systems on my ignition machine---so that I could get it all set before hand and so I could get some experience with it.
-I didn't want to get to Bonneville and have problems.
-Still had some issues when I got to Bonneville but I can say that if you could use it every week or every day it can be a very neat system.
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-My main problem is basically just getting a decent tach trigger which I haven't figured out yet because I can't be running the race car here at the shop just to test the LM1.
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-My thinking is the LM1 is designed for computer operated engines with stock inductive ignition systems----and it's NOT designed properly for MSD ignitions and open headers.
-There's always issues with the sensor temperature being too hot like with turbos----and going too cool during a wide open throttle run on with open headers.
-Open headers and the LM1 are NOT friends at any low speed because of the big cam overlaps and the sensor too close to the open air end of the collector.
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-I actually like the LM1 but I just don't have any good way to test and get everything preset up so that I'm not wasting time at the Bonneville events WORKING on the LM1.
 
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