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Discussion Starter #1
I have searched, but not found an answer to my question.

How much clearance is needed between the backing plates of a narrowed axle housing, and the framerails.

The narrowed Ford 9" axle will be going in my backhalf - project car: a '62 Chevy II.

I want to get an axle as narrow as possible to take full advantage of my backhalf (20" center to center of framerails, and 22" from outside edge to outside edge). But I 've never done this either.

Any help is much appreciated, thanks.
 

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Narrowed rear end

Try dutchman axles in oregon,real reasonable and fast delivery,you'll have to google them to get their phone number and address
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks but I already have someone lined out locally who will narrow the housing using a jig for $125.

I'm just trying to get a ballpark figure of the clearance needed.
 

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If you have the wheels/tires you plan to use, mock it up and take some measurements. With 20" between the rails. it sounds like you've got plenty of room for a big tire.
 

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I have searched, but not found an answer to my question.

How much clearance is needed between the backing plates of a narrowed axle housing, and the framerails.

The narrowed Ford 9" axle will be going in my backhalf - project car: a '62 Chevy II.

I want to get an axle as narrow as possible to take full advantage of my backhalf (20" center to center of framerails, and 22" from outside edge to outside edge). But I 've never done this either.

Any help is much appreciated, thanks.
It sounds like you might be approaching this out of sequence a bit. The measurements for the rearend housing should be in reference to the tire and wheel combination you plan to run at ride height. If this is a backhalf project and there is an issue of the housing end or backing plate coming into contact with the frame rails, I don't think the width of the rearend housing will be the primary issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It sounds like you might be approaching this out of sequence a bit. The measurements for the rearend housing should be in reference to the tire and wheel combination you plan to run at ride height. If this is a backhalf project and there is an issue of the housing end or backing plate coming into contact with the frame rails, I don't think the width of the rearend housing will be the primary issue.
Sequence?.... I'm sure there is more than simply one way of doing this, like just about anything else.

I think you've misconstrued my question, I was only trying to get a ballpark figure of how big of tires, wheels and consequently, how narrow a rear end.
 

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I have never narrowed a rearend housing to the width measurement of the frame rails - only to the wheel and tire combination. The width between the mounting surfaces of the wheels is the critical measurement (which takes into the account the backspacing of the wheels). Assuming the frame rails are already welded in place, the measurement of the space between the frame rail and the fender is constant (what is that measurement? Use that measurement for calculating the widest tire you can fit.). Again, my recommendation is to narrow your rearend housing according to the measurements of the wheel and tire combination, not the width of the frame rails. However, if you want to narrow the rearend housing without the wheels and tires, go for it...to each his own. Good luck with that.
 

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I have never narrowed a rearend housing to the width measurement of the frame rails - only to the wheel and tire combination. The width between the mounting surfaces of the wheels is the critical measurement (which takes into the account the backspacing of the wheels). Assuming the frame rails are already welded in place, the measurement of the space between the frame rail and the fender is constant (what is that measurement? Use that measurement for calculating the widest tire you can fit.). Again, my recommendation is to narrow your rearend housing according to the measurements of the wheel and tire combination, not the width of the frame rails. However, if you want to narrow the rearend housing without the wheels and tires, go for it...to each his own. Good luck with that.
Im in the same process and I did what Vin63 recommends. I picked wheel/tire combo. Now I have to pick what brakes Im going with and then with the wheels mocked up and knowing what brakes Im using I can figure out or the shop can figure out how much to narrow the rear. This will be based on wheel mounting surfaces side to side and then space needed for mounting the brakes. Hope this helps ya.
 

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Sequence?.... I'm sure there is more than simply one way of doing this, like just about anything else.

I think you've misconstrued my question, I was only trying to get a ballpark figure of how big of tires, wheels and consequently, how narrow a rear end.
It all depends on what backspacing the rims and tires have that you are planning to use.

Building a backhalved car isn't a cookie-cutter operation. There are several variables that must be taken into consideration. It requires some basic engineering and you can't just say a certain width rear will work with any combo. It will only be right with one specific wheel/tire combo and since there are numerous backspacing and width options available, what Vin63 is telling you is that you are putting the cart before the horse.

When you narrow the rear, the design is totally dictated by the wheels and tires and the physical limitations of the vehicle. The first thing you do before cutting anything is select the wheels and tires. Then everything else follows that.
 

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Ok.. I have a similar setup. 62 nova. 24" wide frame (art morrison 4-link) ford 9" narrowed. My flange to flange is 48.250". And really thats a decent size for my street tire/wheel combo. 10" wheel with a 5.75" backspacing gives a nice look. Prolly three inches of wheel lip. I wouldnt go too much narrower than 48" flange to flange if your car is a street car and street wheels. You will end up with too much wheel hanging out off the hub. Try to keep the center of the wheel (a 10 inch wheel is 11 inches) balanced. Im a lil inboard by a 1/4" but thats fine.

An 11 inch wheel will work fine with 48" flange to flange. And for the street thats about as wide as they come, for matching tires. Yup, you can go with a 12" wheel and 335 tires. But then you are sacrificing the ability to put your springs (spring and roll bar) out toward the hub where you will get the most bang for yer buck.

And everyone was correct. Build the car from the wheels in. The wheels you plan to use will dictate everything after that.

Now, I was assuming this was a street car. If its a 1/4 mile car then all bets are off. JR



 
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