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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, I feel like a complete idiot for asking this question. But, I've never done this before and I'm having trouble. Seems it would be simple to mount and engine on a stand, but for me at least, not the case.

Can someone please post exact step-by-step instructions down to the last itty bitty detail?

I don't want to spoil the fun by telling the nature of the problem I'm having just yet because I don't want to shift focus away from the detailed instructions. After all, there may be other ignorant people out there like me that could use them.

After I see the details, I'll 'splain where my problem is.
 

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Ok ... Ill give this a shot... assuming the engine is on the ground remove the trans (if you havent already) take the 4 fingered flange(mount) from the engine stand and attach it to the engine on the backside where you just removed the trans. then you and 4 of your closest friends (or just you and a cherry picker) place the large end of the engine mount into the engine stand.
 

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The above pretty much covers it. Use the bellhousing bolt holes to mount the bracket too. Once its mounted, tighten up the bolts and try and get the center tube as close to center on the motor as possible. Tighten the arm bolts. Then, lift it up with your cherry picker, and place it in the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ahh, so the head has to be removed from the stand first, attached to the engine, then you slide the head into the stand and snug up the bolts last? If so, then that must be my problem.

I had the engine on a hoist, and was trying to mate it up to the fully assembled head/stand assembly. After much frustration I was able to get the stand arms mounted to the engine and snugged up tight, but the arms were out of square with the stand head plate and I was afraid to pull them tight because this is an aluminum LS2 block I'm working with.

Below are some pics of the current situation.

Engine on the hoist with engine stand partially attached. Yes, that's a shipping pallet under the engine--it will be removed once the stand is supporting the engine...



Here's a top-down view of the top driver's side arm and bolt. Note how the arm is out of square with the stand bracket...



I was afraid to pull the arms tight to the head bracket for fear of putting adverse pressure on the engine block.
 

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I usually have to add spacers to the mounting arms between the rear of the block and the arm. They're usually 3/8" bolts and I use a couple 1/2" nuts on all four mounting arms to get additional clearance for the flexplate etc.

I've done it both ways, remove the head and attach to the motor and then slide it into the stand head, but most of the time I just hang the motor and bolt it directly to the four mounting arms. It's all personal preference.

The last motor I had on a stand was a 540 bbc and before that was a VERY heavy 392 Chrysler hemi with a 6:71 blower on top. I several stands and the main one is a 1250# stand and I had to block the front of the motor to the base with the hemi and blower mounted together. The 540 bbc did not bend the stand at all. Those old Chrysler hemis are VERY heavy.

I think in your case some spacers may be needed. I also use die or tooling flat washers on the arm mounts to the head. The thin non heat treated flat washers tend to bend into the slots and will give a little. I would always use grade 5 or greater with die/tooling flat washers on the head. There is a lot of twisting force on those bolts.

Good luck with your stand.
 

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Sockets work very well for spacers if you had a set that you aren't using. They are strong and normally the same length.
 

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X2 to both those comments... AND fan out the arms a little more IMO... so they arent straight across from each other... just my 2 cents... and worth it.. :turn:
 

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X2 to both those comments... AND fan out the arms a little more IMO... so they arent straight across from each other... just my 2 cents... and worth it.. :turn:
I agree. I have the two top arms on the next set of holes higher on the block. With the engine hanging from the cherry picker(engine hoist) higher than needed, I bolt just the head on the engine. Once it's attached, I lift the engine stand and fit it onto the head and set the rotation pin in place. Then I lower the engine and stand onto the floor and detach from the picker if everything looks good.
 

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On another note, do not use the lower bolt holes in the webbing where the starter is. The webbing is very thin on these aluminum engines, and a fully dressed engine can break off the mounting boss where the starter is located...seen it happen when you start to push a fully dressed engine around the shop, and it starts bouncing on the stand. Just FYI...

T,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just to bring (what I hope will be) closure to this thread, I did get the engine mounted on the stand. I would have had to remove the handle to the engine stand head to get the head out, so I ended up just leaving it attached and tightening up the bolts that hold the arms to the stand head. The arms came just about square without a whole lot of effort, so the situation was not as bad as I first thought.

I'm not sure how anyone gets away with using anything but the lower 4 bolt holes on the block. The head arms would not go anywhere else, so I used what was available. I did put a washer between the engine and each head arm to better spread the load.

The engine did bounce when I moved it over the threshold from my garage into the small shop behind my garage. I panicked when I saw this, but it held and settled. The engine will remain stationary until I'm ready to install it--I have no intention of moving it around at all until that time. Still, I'm thinking I may go back and stick a 2x4 from the oil pan to the floor just to remove some stress on the joints.

Thanks for all the input, everyone.

Here's a pic of how I have it mounted...

 

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Looks good... Yeah, it's kind of nerve-wracking to see the engine just hanging there by a few bolts, but it does work.

One thing that picture reminded me of: if you ever pull that pin in the stand head to rotate the engine...beware of that black handle. The engine may not be balanced (top-to-bottom) the way you expect, and it may rotate. That handle will crack you in the jaw if you're not careful. Also, as you add/remove things to the engine, that will change the balance, and therefore the orientation that it will want to rotate to.
 

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One thing that picture reminded me of: if you ever pull that pin in the stand head to rotate the engine...beware of that black handle. The engine may not be balanced (top-to-bottom) the way you expect, and it may rotate. That handle will crack you in the jaw if you're not careful. Also, as you add/remove things to the engine, that will change the balance, and therefore the orientation that it will want to rotate to.

I would like to add to that...

If the engine is fully built and starts to rotate one way or the other, if your engine stand is 3 wheeled, be carefull that it doesnt flip the engine stand over with the engine on it. I dumped a 327 that way once when I lost the grip on the engine and it all went. After that, I only buy 4 legged stands...:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Looks good... Yeah, it's kind of nerve-wracking to see the engine just hanging there by a few bolts, but it does work.

One thing that picture reminded me of: if you ever pull that pin in the stand head to rotate the engine...beware of that black handle. The engine may not be balanced (top-to-bottom) the way you expect, and it may rotate. That handle will crack you in the jaw if you're not careful. Also, as you add/remove things to the engine, that will change the balance, and therefore the orientation that it will want to rotate to.
Thanks for the advice, patman. I've already played with rotating the engine just a little, so it must be fairly well balanced as is. I'll remember this when it's time to change out the oil pan, however.
 
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