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I am trying to wire the original heater fan switch on my '63 up to the blower on my Classic Auto Air unit. I did some testing and it looks to me like there is output on a two of the terminals at once on the original switch depending on what speed it is on. Of course I don't understand this :mad: so can someone help me understand why? Maybe it has something to do with the resistor and how it works. The new unit has a 3 speed blower so I figured it would work but before I destroy something I wanted to ask for enlightenment!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Anyone help a Nova brother?
 

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..

are you sure the switch controls the power and not the ground side of the circuit?
craig
 

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nope it controls power sorry ...
there is a wiring diagram in this section i had to print one off for my rewire job on my 64 wagon..
looks like the brown is power in and the outs are brown black and grey
grey being high speed ..brown low.. and black medium
hope this helps
craig
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It seems that a schematic I have shows 2 of the terminals supply power to the resistor at one speed.
 

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Hi kcmocarguy,

Are you doing your testing with the switch and resistor still hooked up with the stock wiring?

Given the way they're wired together, it is normal to see power at more than two of the switch terminals depending on the switch position (speed). Simply unplugging the resistor will make it easier for you to test the switch with a testlight to see which terminals correspond to the high/med/low positions.

The "high" speed terminal of the heater switch has a wire leading directly to the motor. It also serves as a junction point for a second wire of the same color that feeds back from the resistor.

On high speed, the switch feeds power directly to the motor through the "high" speed terminal. But on low/med speeds, power first goes through the resistor, then back to the "high" speed terminal (which serves as a junction point) and then to the motor. The switch doesn't supply power directly to the "high" speed terminal in the low/med positions but there is power there due to the "feedback" through the resistor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Ray and David, it is making sense now! I should have figured that the resistor came in to play somehow. I think I can make this work now. Thanks again, folks on the site are the best.
 
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