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I've got new doors for my rusted out 71. I was thinking of taking them to get painted then hanging them myself. How do you get the old pins out of th hinges? Are there new pin kits ? Since the hinges are welded instead of bolted to the body how do you work with alignment?

What about swapping all of the door internals, is this a real pain? Anyone with experience?
 

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I would hold off on painting or body work on them until you trial hang them to see how they fit. When the welded on hinges were put on originally I'm assuming they had to have a jig to locate them but there's always the room for tolerances that can stack up. Add in the variable of whether the same jig was used on both cars, or the cars were assembled a different factories, or if the door was ever tweaked from a minor ccident, you can see why a person needs to trial fit something first.
The pins should drive straight up and out of the hinge but before you drive them out, look to see if there are any retension clips by the bottom end of the pin (there were some on my 74).
Once the pins are out install new bushings before hanging the replacement doors and inspect the pins for any wear. If needed, replace them also. Do not worry about putting in the spring that holds the door open right now as this will not affect alignment (save that task for later once the doors are going on for the last time).
The guts should interchange in some range of years. You just need to know what you have and do a visual inspection also to compare the ones against the originals.
Hopefully the doors will line up properly. If not then at that point we can discuss and figure out how to correct a sag, being too high, too far forward or rearward, etc.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Custom Jim said:
I would hold off on painting or body work on them until you trial hang them to see how they fit. When the welded on hinges were put on originally I'm assuming they had to have a jig to locate them but there's always the room for tolerances that can stack up. Add in the variable of whether the same jig was used on both cars, or the cars were assembled a different factories, or if the door was ever tweaked from a minor ccident, you can see why a person needs to trial fit something first.
The pins should drive straight up and out of the hinge but before you drive them out, look to see if there are any retension clips by the bottom end of the pin (there were some on my 74).
Once the pins are out install new bushings before hanging the replacement doors and inspect the pins for any wear. If needed, replace them also. Do not worry about putting in the spring that holds the door open right now as this will not affect alignment (save that task for later once the doors are going on for the last time).
The guts should interchange in some range of years. You just need to know what you have and do a visual inspection also to compare the ones against the originals.
Hopefully the doors will line up properly. If not then at that point we can discuss and figure out how to correct a sag, being too high, too far forward or rearward, etc.
Jim
Thanks for the advice jim! I will give it a try!
 

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I am in the process of fitting doors on my 71 right now. I found a 70 drivers side door and popped it on, think it will be fine. Mine also have welded hinges. Maybe I got lucky with the "70" door. The internals look very close to my originals but I plan on keeping the internals that came with the doner door. As far as alignment, I do not see any way to make adjustments. This is why we are aligning the fenders and quarters TO THE DOORS.

I usually get out the digital cam and take as many pix as possibe. Could come in handy later.
 

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walkerjay said:
As far as alignment, I do not see any way to make adjustments. This is why we are aligning the fenders and quarters TO THE DOORS.

I usually get out the digital cam and take as many pix as possibe. Could come in handy later.
The only adjustements are made by either force or by a combination of force and rewelding the hinges into the correct position. It's also possible a person could rework the welded on hinge system and make it adjustable with floating backup plates on the inside of the cowl side and inside the doors like on the older models (I did a similiar modification to my hatchlid hinges that were originally welded on but now are adjustable and makes taking the lid off much easier. I also tack welded a washer to the underside to where now the gaps are real nice and later when it is off to get painted and then reinstalled I won't have to realign it).
I put on new full quarters on my 74 (and didn't take many pictures at all since I didn't have a digital camera at the time) and I still tweaked the original doors to where they fit the best they could against the rocker sills and then looked at the fit of the window frame by roofs drip rail. I did not concern myself with the fit of the door to the quarter. My one door needed some lift on the back edge and on that I opened the door, placed a section of 2x4 on the jack pad and then raised the jack up to where the 2x4 hit the flat section of the inner door structure by the weatherstrip. I then jacked the door up and got a feel for how much resistance was in the jack handle and then let the jack down, closed the door and saw if I made any improvement. If it was good to go I worked on other things but if not I opened the door again, used the floor jack again but added a little more pressure and checked the fit again. I kept going and slowly sneaked up on the fit as I knew it would be a bear to try and lower the back edge of the door if it was too high. I mostly concentrated on the lower edge of the door to rocker sill gap since I knew I could fit or work the new quarters to get a nice back edge of the door to front edge of the quarter panel gap.
Once I had a good rocker to botom edge of door gap I then found out the doors had a litle bit of a twist in them to where the level of the door at the quarter panel was in a tad and the bottom back edge of the door was high in level to the quarter panel. On this I again used a section of 2x4 and partially closed the door against it and then using brute force with my feet I pushed the bottom back edge of the door in to take out the twist. Here too I slowly got it to fit right. If I had went too far I would have had to place the 2x4 down low and then apply pressure up high on the door.
On my car the factory tolerances were so/so and I had to cut the welds holding the door glass window frame to the doors inner structure and move it about 1/4" and then rewelded it back on.

Something I never though about and still have to check on mine is my doors are gutted and still are and I have read that the factory placed the doors on the car with them hanging a little high in the rear to where when the glass and other parts were installed the door sagged down to where they fit better. When I get further with mine I will probably put the guts in the door and see if it makes a difference and if it does then I need to raise the door this amount to compensate for that added weight inside of it. I would hate to find out after the paint work is done and the car reassembled that the doors needed to be raised a little.

Jim
 

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"I have read that the factory placed the doors on the car with them hanging a little high in the rear to where when the glass and other parts were installed the door sagged down to where they fit better."

good point! I better check this out myself too. I have some extra glass. Think I will drop off a section to my body guy for him to insert in the door and use that xtra weight for alignmnt purposes of the other components.
 
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