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Big blocks are new to me and have pulled down the 489 i have..not by choice and i will never trust anyone who sells me a built engine from now on... That's another story . It's a gen vi block.. Was a solid flat cam... Want to go a street roller now... Conflicting info on this new block about lifter bores.. Been advised to go to the .904 lifter ... Is it needed in this new revised big block.. Heard that a lot of the older style blocks may have had issues.. Also what lifter should i go.. Found some crowers and they are well priced ... Or are they the cheap and unreliable ones that will fail on me... C66201-16 .. Full bodied lifter
 

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I would be looking at using a good .842 lifter before considering going to a .904. Crower is a very good brand for lifters. For a street car, I would go hydraulic roller all the way though. A big issue with solid rollers on the street is the loading and unloading of the wheel. If you use a rev kit it will help this.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would be looking at using a good .842 lifter before considering going to a .904. Crower is a very good brand for lifters. For a street car, I would go hydraulic roller all the way though. A big issue with solid rollers on the street is the loading and unloading of the wheel. If you use a rev kit it will help this.
.. my builder is set on going solid roller.. engine i purchased was told had 10.6-1 comp... now discovering it has 11.8-1 so may as well take advantage of it... will sound crisper to i think... but yeah i thought the same hydraulic roller... then again have seen 2 sets of morel hydraulic roller lifters go in a 496 of someone i know...
 

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Then invest in a rev kit. It will keep constant load on the rollers so the wheels never skid on the lobes, and the needles in the body are always loaded. I ran .842 morel solid lifters in my engines for the last 10 years. the last engine was an .814/.798 282/290 @.050 cam. 300 lbs on the seat and almost 800 open. I did have crower solid rollers in my engines prior to that. But either way, make sure they have the HIPPO oiling in them. I think that is pretty much standard now, but it wasn't years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Then invest in a rev kit. It will keep constant load on the rollers so the wheels never skid on the lobes, and the needles in the body are always loaded. I ran .842 morel solid lifters in my engines for the last 10 years. the last engine was an .814/.798 282/290 @.050 cam. 300 lbs on the seat and almost 800 open. I did have crower solid rollers in my engines prior to that. But either way, make sure they have the HIPPO oiling in them. I think that is pretty much standard now, but it wasn't years ago.
are these bushed lifters worth the extra $$ or no use paying if the engine doesn't turn past 6800rpm... Isky seems to be the choice for bushed rollers..
 

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are these bushed lifters worth the extra $$ or no use paying if the engine doesn't turn past 6800rpm... Isky seems to be the choice for bushed rollers..
I don't think they are. Mine were standard needle rollers. My engine made peak power at 7200 and was shifted at 75 crossing at 7700.
 

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BBC Chevy engines regardless of generation have a .842 lifter bore. Because of their goofy angles and inconsistencies in those angles (a major reason flat tappets cams can fail early on these engines) bushing the lifter bores is required. But not all blocks will need this type of machine work especially for street type engines. If you decide to bush moving to the next larger lifter (.904) makes sense. A larger lifter is ALWAYS preferred and much like a larger cam core, allows a reduction in the velocity of the valve train without hurting area under the curve.

Really it has to do with the roller OD where a .842 lifter has a .750 wheel a .904 a .812 diameter wheel and finally the .937 lifter is a .850 wheel. Typically cam manufactures will adjust the lobe of the cam to suit the lifter wheel size.

Bushed lifters are my preferred style but I agree with bracketchev70 getting the HIPPO option is a must if you elect to go with needle bearing. If bushed refrain from restricting oil to the valve train.
I've got a draw full of busted mechanical roller lifters from a street car from all of the name brands and the best on the market in my opinion are the Crowers. They also offer the best hydraulic lifters on the market too. Really, for a hot street car where you may not be racing and looking for maximum power I too would stick with a hydraulic roller. Spring pressures are reduced considerably and so is the failure rate. Spend the extra money on the Crower lifters and trust me when I say there is a difference.

If you go hydraulic a .842 is all you need and all that is offered in the Crower line.

We can then continue the conversation by talking springs and oil...

Okay, hope this helps....
 

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A couple of thoughts.
Crower products are exceptional. I would suggest their DuraMax, bushed roller.
I would never run a solid roller on the street with needle bearings.
Rev kits are yesterday's news. Today's springs have made them obsolete/unnecessary.
 

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I run solid rollers on the street all the time.

No rev kit necessary.

I run a Comp mechanical roller in my 406 and an Isky mechanical roller in my Gen VI Big Block. Both are street-driven.

When I check my lash it never moves. Rock-solid adjustment and the performance is awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
BBC Chevy engines regardless of generation have a .842 lifter bore. Because of their goofy angles and inconsistencies in those angles (a major reason flat tappets cams can fail early on these engines) bushing the lifter bores is required. But not all blocks will need this type of machine work especially for street type engines. If you decide to bush moving to the next larger lifter (.904) makes sense. A larger lifter is ALWAYS preferred and much like a larger cam core, allows a reduction in the velocity of the valve train without hurting area under the curve.

Really it has to do with the roller OD where a .842 lifter has a .750 wheel a .904 a .812 diameter wheel and finally the .937 lifter is a .850 wheel. Typically cam manufactures will adjust the lobe of the cam to suit the lifter wheel size.

Bushed lifters are my preferred style but I agree with bracketchev70 getting the HIPPO option is a must if you elect to go with needle bearing. If bushed refrain from restricting oil to the valve train.
I've got a draw full of busted mechanical roller lifters from a street car from all of the name brands and the best on the market in my opinion are the Crowers. They also offer the best hydraulic lifters on the market too. Really, for a hot street car where you may not be racing and looking for maximum power I too would stick with a hydraulic roller. Spring pressures are reduced considerably and so is the failure rate. Spend the extra money on the Crower lifters and trust me when I say there is a difference.

If you go hydraulic a .842 is all you need and all that is offered in the Crower line.

We can then continue the conversation by talking springs and oil...

Okay, hope this helps....
thanks for your input.. heads have springs to suit a flat tappet so either way need to be changed... had a roller in my 363 Windsor and the thing turned to 7500 in a blink... had no troubles with valve train but never had the car long enough to find out..Windsors or Cleveland's never had lifter bore issues like these BB's... how do you determine spring pressure to use.. is there a guide or rule of thumb that anything over certain lift/duration .. forgive my ignorance...
 

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thanks for your input.. heads have springs to suit a flat tappet so either way need to be changed... had a roller in my 363 Windsor and the thing turned to 7500 in a blink... had no troubles with valve train but never had the car long enough to find out..Windsors or Cleveland's never had lifter bore issues like these BB's... how do you determine spring pressure to use.. is there a guide or rule of thumb that anything over certain lift/duration .. forgive my ignorance...
Believe it or not a lot of hyd roller cams use the same spring pressures as a stout mechanical flat tappet, although some of the newer hyd roller lifters are allowing more spring pressures. You can find the recommended spring pressures from the cam manufacture and then pick a spring that will work with your installed height and pressure requirements. There are tons of springs to choose from and I have found springs from PAC to be the most dependable especially with aggressive lift and ramp profiles.

So if leaning towards a roller, I know spring companies like PAC, will recommend that the spring be @.050 from coil bind. This an attempt to reign in damaging harmonics from the spring. A really good height mic and a bunch of shim along with time and tedious note taking will allow you to achieve this end. Pressures may be more than required but that is the trade off for spring longevity.
 

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Big blocks are new to me and have pulled down the 489 i have..not by choice and i will never trust anyone who sells me a built engine from now on... That's another story . It's a gen vi block.. Was a solid flat cam... Want to go a street roller now... Conflicting info on this new block about lifter bores.. Been advised to go to the .904 lifter ... Is it needed in this new revised big block.. Heard that a lot of the older style blocks may have had issues.. Also what lifter should i go.. Found some crowers and they are well priced ... Or are they the cheap and unreliable ones that will fail on me... C66201-16 .. Full bodied lifter
I have found that Crower lifters run to small for GM lifter bores, I machine a lot of those old blocks and lifter bore placement is all over the place using a roller cam changes you seat timing events.

If you choose to upgrade to .904 or even .937 have some that owns a CNC machine your block for you. Stay away for from fixturing I have seen some pretty poor job using fixtures.

Here is a thread I did and this block came from a high end drag race shop. One I fixed the block the customer said the engine never ran so good.
https://www.facebook.com/cncblocks.northeast/posts/692353837611128
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Taking engine to another shop now who builds mostly race engines. Is well know for his Chev's. See what they have to say. They do all their machining in house ... Should have gone there from the beginning but made the mistake of trusting someone else with this new engine. 40mins on the dyno and I'm pulling it down.
 
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