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Looking for some expert advice on how to connect a Holley Red pump and a Summit fuel filter, both with 3/8" NPT threads, to 3/8" aluminum fuel line. I see hard tube adapters for the AN plumbing, but it seems like a needless step to transition NPT to AN and then back again. Suggestions?
 

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Nobody, huh?

If it helps, car is a '66 hardtop. Goal is a street car that might get down the strip once or twice. I've just mounted a brand new stock gas tank with a brand new 3/8" pickup/sending unit. Engine is a mildly built 350. I think the block is a '93 roller cam block and I can't run a mechanical pump. Current carburetor is a 670 cfm Edelbrock.
 

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If you have an industrial fitting store go see those guys. They specialize in oddball fittings for air, hydraulic, natrual gas, feul etc. Marine and even B.B.Q. repair suppliers may be a source too.
 

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both with 3/8" NPT threads
How about a pipe nipple connecting the 2 pieces, and a flare fitting for the end where the tubing goes? Hoseman stores have a lot of fittings in steel, which are less expensive than aluminum.
 

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Well, I thought it would be easier to run than steel?
Aluminum has a fatigue limit. Over time it can develop cracks and leak. This is why aluminum connecting rods are race only. I'd run mild steel lines on a street car. Then you can put tube nuts on them and flare to your heart's desire.

Yes, aluminum is easier to run. Been there, done that. But that was on a race car.

JMO.
 

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I have had aluminum lines on many cars and never heard of or had one fail. Anyone else? Im not saying it cant happen just never thought of it. Cant aluminum be flared too?
 

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20 feet of Pro-lite 350 Earls line #6 and the AN fittings front to back and your done. This is safe and easy to work with. By the time you buy all the little fittings you need your going to be in the same price range.

Also if you bend your line to much your done. There is not a real cheap way to do this and this is something you don't want to cheap out on.

Fire is not your friend.:devil::devil::devil:
 
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