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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I'm a newbie so I'm sorry if this is some beginner stuff, but I'm trying to figure out my best fuel supply route. I got a new stainless fuel tank with stainless front to back line. My fuel pump which is an edlebrock generic that i got from orielys
was in the engine compartment. Which I now learned should be under the car at the other end of the fuel line so that it is pushing the fuel rather that pulling. Well, there was a fire because a clamp came loose so now i need a new fuel pump.
Should i keep the electric pump and run the wire from the switch to the back of the car and mount the pump directly next to the tank? Or should I swap to a mechanical pump? and if mechanical do i need a return line?
Also need some advice on the best materials to get from the fuel line into the carb. It came with a hard line but it didn't seem like there would be a good way to do that. Maybe that braided steel fuel hose with better clamps than a cheap hose clamp?

The engine is a 350 with an edlebrock carb. and this is just a Sunday driver. With hopes in the future of upgrading to something more road trip built, but thst will most likely include swapping engines.
any advice is appreicated.
Thanks
 

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1963 Nova coupe, Phoenix Arizona
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I agree, nothing wrong with a mechanical one . I like the push lock fittings, not a big fan of the steal braided, hard to tell if the line is going bad. They make fittings to go from hard line to AN, mine have been on for 10 years with no issues on my LS.

Earl's Performance Tube Adapter Fittings AT165006ERL

 

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Discussion Starter #5
thank you all for the input. with the mechanical pump will I need a return line to the tank? and that just hooks up to where the evap tube is now?
this pump says one inlet and one outlet but looks like it has three fittings in the photo.

those connectors look awesome I'll definitely use those. thank you
 

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That 3rd fitting might be a vent. No return line on a mechanical pump. Order one for a 1968-70 350. Pre-emissions. Or a 69-73 C-10 pickup 350. But sometimes the image is not of the actual part!
 

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1963 Nova coupe, Phoenix Arizona
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What Steve said, here’s one from rockauto 69 nova, the pic is upside down. The hex part is the feed from the tank the tube goes to the carb. I would just get a barb fitting for the hex and run fuel injection hose from your local auto parts store with fuel injection clamps. I think the fuel injection hose is a little thicker & lasts longer and the clamps are better. You will also need a fuel pump push rod since you have an electric pump now. I’m sure the push rod was removed when they did the electric fuel pump.

408074

408075
 

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First, make sure your block is drilled for the pushrod, or you are stuck with the electric.
I moved my engine back 2 inches, and there is no room for the mechanical pump with the frame in the way.
I put the pump under it and the first pump lasted About 5 years.
Still on second, its been 4 years.
Only problem is carb runs dry when going through the gears.
If your engine is mostly stock, u should have no problem.
To prevent vapor lock, it has a fuel filter that has 3 tubes on it with one that shoots some fuel back to the tank
 

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Discussion Starter #12
that plate down at the bottom right is the block off plate right? yeah it might be tight with a 350 shoved in that engine compartment. I'll have to measure. good looking out
 

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1963 Nova coupe, Phoenix Arizona
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Chris has a very good point ! In 85 I put a new long block 85 small block, that fell off the assembly line into the back of my brothers truck, into my 73 Nova at the time. I think it had a block off plate on it but the block was drilled for a push rod, I swapped over all the parts from the old motor including the pump. For the life of me I couldn’t get any fuel to pump, I think I took it off and on 5 times and even bought a new one, come to find out the motor was for a fuel injected Camaro and there wasn’t a lobe on the cam to move the fuel pump push rod and had to run an electric one. So just something else to check !
 

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Discussion Starter #14
so even with that block off plate I may not be in luck? what do I need to look for? will there just literally be nothing behind that plate if it's a no go?
also, will I be able to do this with the engine mounted in the engine compartment? or will I not be able to get the push rod in?
 

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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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If the engine is a '78-'79 350, the block number should be 3970010. Look on the drivers side at the rear of the block.
If that is the number block you have, then it will use a mechanical pump with one inlet and one outlet connector. Also,
something to think about is if the camshaft is made to use a mechanical fuel pump. Some cams don't have the lobe
to push the pump rod.
 

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Thank you. Is there a way to check for that lobe when I take off that block off plate?
Yes
Put a rod e or a push ride in the hole turn the crank over with a breaker bar and five eights and you should see the pump rod going in and out and if it does then it will work with a mechanical pump
 

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Mike - 74 Nova Baltimore, MD
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Thank you. Is there a way to check for that lobe when I take off that block off plate?
This is only a suggestion... as I have never done this.
You might be able to check for a fuel pump cam lobe by using an extra long glue stick (that is used in a hot glue gun). The diameter of the glue stick should be a little bit smaller than the diameter of a fuel pump push rod... but should be longer. I chose a glue stick because it will not harm the cam lobe.
Refer to the image below along with these procedures.

Remove the fuel pump cover plate (CP).
408095

Insert the glue stick into the fuel pump push rod hole (red arrow below).
  • Note: If you feel that something is blocking the insertion of the glue stick, remove the bolt indicated by the white arrow in the above photo. If you are going to use a fuel pump push rod, a shorter bolt (that does not interfere with the fuel pump push rod) will need to be reinstalled into this hole... or you will have a oil leak.
Once the glue stick is fully inserted and touching the cam lobe, place a straight edge across the fuel pump cover plate portion of the block (blue line below) and while pushing the glue stick against the cam, draw a line on the glue stick that is even with the straight edge.
408093

While pushing on the glue stick, turn/crank your engine over a few times and watch the line on the glue stick in relationship to the straight edge. If the line on the glue stick moves (it won't be much movement), you should have a fuel pump lobe on the camshaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thank you all for the tips. I don't know what cam the engine has in it, but my brother who has some more experience said it didn't sound stock when the engine was running. Ill have to further investigate later this month. So if my cam does have that node...how do i know what push rod to get if i don't know what cam i have? It looks like theyre sold for copper cams, flat cam, roller cam? I dont want to damage my cam obviously, and since I dont know what's in there and didn't pull it out while I had the engine out of the car should I just stick with electronic to be safe? I already have an under dash switch, i just need to run that wire to the rear location for a better setup.
 

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Mike - 74 Nova Baltimore, MD
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If you have a regular flat tappet hydraulic cam (cast iron), you should use a steel/chromoly fuel pump push rod.

If you have a hydraulic roller cam made of ductile iron (most street roller cams), you should use a steel/chromoly fuel pump push rod that has a bronze tip.

 
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