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I decided to hook up my choke for my quadrajet. (350 cu.in.) The choke thermostat mounts to a plate that is bolted to the manifold. I took this plate off earlier thinking that it was just a cover when not using choke. Come to find out choke connects to this plate. Anyhow the hollowed out area in manifold was filled with what appeared to be fine sand. I started to remove the sand but then thought maybe it was put there to hold the heat since aluminun disperses heat faster then cast iron. I called tech. at edelbrock, he told me this was probably left in there when manifold was cast and to remove it. If this is true why would anyone mount the cover plate without removing it because plate wasn't on it when cast? Can anyone answer this. It just does'nt make since. I still think it was in there for a reason? Sorry for being so long winded.

Thanks Charlie
 
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Two reasons,

The first is, the worker that was to remove ALL the core sand from the manifold, missed some in the choke stove area.

The person that "assembled" the manifold after final machining more than likely can't read or speak english (only Spanish/Mexican, which is the general makeup of the workers in the Edelbrock foundary and to a lesser extent, machine shops), and just didn't care in getting it right, only in the pay cheque.
 

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The sand is most likely used during the casting process. It should not be left in there from the factory.
 

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IgnitionMan said:
The person that "assembled" the manifold after final machining more than likely can't read or speak english (only Spanish/Mexican, which is the general makeup of the workers in the Edelbrock foundary and to a lesser extent, machine shops), and just didn't care in getting it right, only in the pay cheque.
Now, Now, Let keep the racism out of it. It's not nice!:)
 
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Any of you ever been to the Edelbrock foundary in San Jascinto/Hemet? It's right down the road about a mile or two from Tom "The Mongoose" McEwen's farm.

I HAVE, and the main language used by the multitude of workers in the shops there isn't English, not by a long shot.

And don't EVER accuse me of being a racist again. What I posted is FACT, not fiction, NOT racism. If I were such a racist, the fellow who volunteered, without my asking him, to help me move here from Los Angeles, a former Mexican Mafia member, wouldn't have ever offered one ounce of help to me.

I'll see him on July 9, at Long Beach, and I'll be sure to tell him there are a few people here that accuse others of being racists on this site. I'm sure he'll be happy to hear that, he has a 1966 Nova I build stuff for him for, and referred him to this site, of which he is a member, along with more than a handful of other people of Mexican decent on this site, I am sure.

Now, yes the sand is from not the permanent molds for the manifold, but the core SAND molds that makes other parts of the manifold, and it was not fully removed by the non-English speaking person that does that job at the foundary.

It's really sad to see a bunch of people speculate, and pull answers out of thin air, when it is very clear, the sand was from the molding cores, and not correctly cleaned away.

Common sense would clearly tell a thinking human being that NOBODY would purposely put sand into a place it doesn't belong.

If you don't know what you are talking about, then don't climb on the case of someone who does and answers the question(s) with FACTS.

You know, I am full Irish, was born in the North, want to make something out of it? Call me a Mick, drunk? What a useless and wasteful post just above this one.
 

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Let's keep it friendly or risk getting posts edited or removed.

I have a couple of comments on the subject.

1. Was this a brand new manifold? I didn't think the choke plate was installed by Edelbrock. It usually comes in a bag. If the manifold was installed and driven before the plate was installed, that sand may be from the road.

2. I once went to California to work on a problem at chrome plating business.
They were having quality problems that affected the numbers of good wheels we got which in turn hurt production of our Mustangs.
Chrome plating is a nasty business. They have warning signs everywhere advising about the health risks. The workers were predominately Mexican/American and many didn't speak much english. They worked hard and did a job that I certainly wouldn't want to do especially for the low wages.

Anyway, I watched the process and quickly discovered one of the problems.
The Titanium Anodes are put on the wheels before going into the dip line.
These are custom made to fit a particular wheel and bolt circle.
What I noticed was some of the wheels had anodes marked 4.5" (Ford BC) and some had anodes marked 4.75" (Chevy BC). If the the Chevy anode was put on a Ford wheel the chrome would have imperfections.
The assembler did not know the little scribings mattered because it was never explained to him in Spanish.
I don't blame him. It was the highly paid, lazy American supervisor for not noticing what I noticed and not taking the time to instruct the worker. I found a bilingual worker and told him what to tell the worker. The worker understood and the problem went away.

While the language and education was a problem, if the guy spoke fluent english and had a college degree or even a high school diploma he wouldn't be working on a chrome plating line.

I've found similar problems in factories staffed with Americans. The root cause was often traced to someone not understanding why a procedure was important.

The bottom line is never assume a brand new part is ready to bolt on.
The engine assemblers should clean and inspect every part that goes in an engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thanks guys!!

Thank god they did'nt leave it in the air chambers.;) :D

Paul:

To answer you're question. No the manifolds not new it's been on the car for 5 years. The sand was packed in there real tight. That's why I questioned rather it was suppose to be there. Thinking maybe to hold the heat in longer? It does'nt matter what nationality you are we all make mistakes.

Thanks Chuck
 

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Like Paul said, you have to check things even when they are new. You need to measure and wash a new crank just like you plug the freezer in and be sure it gets cold before you load it with good ice cream and frozen Mrs Smiths frozen pies......LOL.
 

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IgnitionMan said:
Any of you ever been to the Edelbrock foundary in San Jascinto/Hemet? It's right down the road about a mile or two from Tom "The Mongoose" McEwen's farm.
I grew up in San Jacinto, so I know the Edelbrock foundry quite well, it's located on S Buena Vista St. I used to work at Century Automotive right next door. The farm your refering to is Agri- Empire owned by Larry Minor.
 

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is this a new or used intake ??? maybe it was glass beaded and the "sand" got in there that way ???


sand and glass bead could be confused...


just a thought... prolly a left fielder but what the heck ;)
 
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