Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
May not be news for some but this just cracked me up at how easy it was to do.. Have a buddy putting a late model turbo motor in a 74 Datsun B210 wagon (yeah its going to surprise some peeps) but we had to cut out the trans tunnel and put it all back together..

The whole inside of the floor was covered with this sound deadener material so we went down and spend 8 bucks on some dry ice and it worked super smooth, had the whole floor done in about 15 minutes with little to no scraping.. im really curious if it would function the same way by freezing the metal inside the car to knock off undercoating but it may not be as effective.. just thought i'd share if you guys find yourself doing the same job.. super easy!

I would suggest leaving one of the bags full of the dry ice to drape over the tunnel.. that stuff got cold holding it on the tunnel even with thick gloves!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,113 Posts
Seen on American Restoration that they used dry ice chips for sandblasting outside. No mess to clean up on a big piece they had and no containment curtain needed either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yeah i was just shocked at how long it would have taken any other way.. Don't think you have to worry about ventilation as i think it's just water vapor.. only thing you really need is heavy duty gloves.. we were using welding gloves and i ended up pulling my hand out of them and using the whole glove, slick way to do it!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Yeah i was just shocked at how long it would have taken any other way.. Don't think you have to worry about ventilation as i think it's just water vapor.. only thing you really need is heavy duty gloves.. we were using welding gloves and i ended up pulling my hand out of them and using the whole glove, slick way to do it!
Dry ice is actually frozen carbon dioxide, evaporates into gaseous carbon dioxide (not water vapor) and is heavier than air, so it will displace air in an enclosed environment. It doesn't happen too fast, but lets say your in the car with the windows rolled up; you'll start to get dizzy.

We use dry ice regularly at work and for some reason, one of our guys put a supply inside the cab of the truck vs. the truck bed; by he got to the job site, he was already affected. Not too good!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top