Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:confused:I'm going to attempt to replace the deteriorating weatherstrip on the 2 doors on my '71 and am looking for some advice from somebody that has done this before.
Trying to get what I need all together before starting. First off, what will remove the adhesive from the factory weatherstripping without taking the paint with it? And which adhesive do I want to use to install the new one? Not yellow snot?
The only thing I think I'm sure of is to do it on a warm sunny day to help the seals "set". Thanks for any suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
3M release agent works for removing the old adhesive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
:)Thanks for the info. F
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
I did a 68 nova and I didn't use any adhesive, tuck in the top and corner window frame, the sides pop in with the plastic t clips in the holes on the door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I did a 68 nova and I didn't use any adhesive, tuck in the top and corner window frame, the sides pop in with the plastic t clips in the holes on the door.
That's interesting info. I would have thought that adhesive would be required to keep everything from moving around.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,497 Posts
I replaced the original door weatherstrips on my 68 and when I removed them there was a thin strip of black glue just in the window frame above the main door structure. Everything below this was held in place by the plastic fasteners. The original glue was black and I used the black 3M weatherstrip glue with the new seals.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157651488318408

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I replaced the original door weatherstrips on my 68 and when I removed them there was a thin strip of black glue just in the window frame above the main door structure. Everything below this was held in place by the plastic fasteners. The original glue was black and I used the black 3M weatherstrip glue with the new seals.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157651488318408

Jim
Thanks for the replies. I think I have enough info to attempt the project. Just waiting for a warm sunny day.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,497 Posts
Thanks for the replies. I think I have enough info to attempt the project. Just waiting for a warm sunny day.
It's not that hard of a project but your doors may need to be slammed shut or closed partially on the first catch until the weatherstrip conforms and molds itself to the opening. Warm to hot weather is a plus when installing them.

Another hint is to start at the top back right angle corner by getting this spot started and then evenly stretch and seat the weatherstrip into the top and front edge of the channel to the first plastic nipple by the upper door hinge then go back and work the back vertical edge downward until it's first nipple can be inserted into it's proper hole, then all that's left is popping in all of the rest of the plastic nipples into the related holes. Heck you might even do a dry run and let it sit to put some stretch into it before it gets installed for the last time. Basically put it on the door in the area it should be around the perimeter but unattached, unglued, and without any plastic nipples pushed in.


Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's not that hard of a project but your doors may need to be slammed shut or closed partially on the first catch until the weatherstrip conforms and molds itself to the opening. Warm to hot weather is a plus when installing them.

Another hint is to start at the top back right angle corner by getting this spot started and then evenly stretch and seat the weatherstrip into the top and front edge of the channel to the first plastic nipple by the upper door hinge then go back and work the back vertical edge downward until it's first nipple can be inserted into it's proper hole, then all that's left is popping in all of the rest of the plastic nipples into the related holes. Heck you might even do a dry run and let it sit to put some stretch into it before it gets installed for the last time. Basically put it on the door in the area it should be around the perimeter but unattached, unglued, and without any plastic nipples pushed in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wY4sBoUcEws

Jim
Pretty informative Jim, and thanks for the help. One last question: are the original plastic nipples easily removed without breaking off, or getting stuck in the holes? Thanks again. F
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,497 Posts
Pretty informative Jim, and thanks for the help. One last question: are the original plastic nipples easily removed without breaking off, or getting stuck in the holes? Thanks again. F
Breakage will depend on how well the plastic has held up through the years and how they get removed. They sell specialized tools called panel poppers that are sorta like a very wide flat screwdriver with a notch cut into the middle. This then gets slid under the plastic "T" shaped clips to support them and apply even pressure to them when the tool is pivoted to lift the clip out of the hole. I've also used needle nose pliers with tape wrapped around them to keep from scratching the paint.
Luckily if they do break off, the holes they go into are through holes in the door metal and if they break off or get pushed into the inside of the door, they will probably and eventually fall out of the drain slots on the bottom of the door or if a bunch do break and go inside the door, the door panel can be removed and then you could remove the remnants.

Jim
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top