Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There is a lot of talk nowadays about dialing in the bell housing and frankly, in the past, especially back in the day, we never did that....

It appears pretty easy, especially with the engine out of the car....

How necessary is this really...?
Who here does it and who here does not...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
There is a lot of talk nowadays about dialing in the bell housing and frankly, in the past, especially back in the day, we never did that....

It appears pretty easy, especially with the engine out of the car....

How necessary is this really...?
Who here does it and who here does not...?
I have the tilton fixture for idexing the bell housing dowels. Its amazing how much those blocks are off some times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,147 Posts
Yes, back in the day I took a lot of transmissions in & out. I never dialed in a bell housing.

But, if you're gonna run a TKO-600, you'll wish you had the first time you try to grab 3rd gear wide open.

There is a lot of talk nowadays about dialing in the bell housing and frankly, in the past, especially back in the day, we never did that....

It appears pretty easy, especially with the engine out of the car....

How necessary is this really...?
Who here does it and who here does not...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
I bought one of those Browell alignment tools (I don't know if I spelled it right), and it worked great. I've rented it out a few times. My TKO 600 never misses because of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
Using the stock GM bellhousing seems to produce a "lot less out of alignment" (better quality tolerances from GM) but if you use a replacement bell like a Lakewood then I would always align. Using the "Browell" type tool gives a good result but for SPOT on alignment I would use the dial indicator. I just did both on my Nova with a new Lakewood bell and although I got an acceptable result with both, if you want to use the stock type pins to locate the bell as opposed to drilling new locating pins, I would next time use the dial only to locate. The dial gives you your out of alignment spec (which is important to know when buying new offset locating pins) verses just centering your bell. Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yes, back in the day I took a lot of transmissions in & out. I never dialed in a bell housing.

But, if you're gonna run a TKO-600, you'll wish you had the first time you try to grab 3rd gear wide open.
I understand that....however....
Will it matter if I am installing a 1972 M-21....????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
I understand that....however....
Will it matter if I am installing a 1972 M-21....????
If you’re using the stock GM bell then you probably have a better than average chance of lining up properly but taking a little extra time to check saves a lot of headache later on if it does not align. Always align when using a different bell or aftermarket bell. More checking on the assembly line, less blood in the driving time.:yes: Jack
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31,194 Posts
Usually the pilot bearings require dialing in, the are not forgiving at all like the bushings were and the newer trannies have tighter tolerances. Typically the Muncies with a pilot bushing ais OK without, but it certainly isn't a bad thing if you do. With a bearing I would for sure though!:yes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
I had trouble with my Richmond 5 speed shifting right before I pulled it out. When I removed the pilot bushing it was heavily worn to one side. That said the input shaft was in a bind and was the most likely cause of my shifting issues.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top