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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, I've got some stainless trim that I want to try my hand at polishing. I have practice pieces so I'll be learning on that before I even get near the pieces that will end up on the Nova. I went looking for a DA but got to reading about the electric Orbital and got confused once again. Can someone please explain the differences in the sanding patterns between the two?

Also, since I don't have an air source yet and I'm most likely only going to be using this to do the stainless on my Nova, would an orbital electric work just as well?
 

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Guys, I've got some stainless trim that I want to try my hand at polishing. I have practice pieces so I'll be learning on that before I even get near the pieces that will end up on the Nova. I went looking for a DA but got to reading about the electric Orbital and got confused once again. Can someone please explain the differences in the sanding patterns between the two?

Also, since I don't have an air source yet and I'm most likely only going to be using this to do the stainless on my Nova, would an orbital electric work just as well?
DA saids for dual action (orbital) so I would say the difference is none
 

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^^^^^^ what he said. Orbital is the same thing as dual action. If you are only planning on using this for your trim, may I suggest getting something like a Dremel tool that has a polishing wheel adaptor. They are small so you won't have a 3 to 6" orbiting wheel to control and you can use a Dremel for so many other fun little things.
 

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Orbital and DA/randon orbital are not the same tool movements, although they often get lumped in the same basket.

A true orbital is a single action tool, it only moves in one pattern, a pre-determined orbit size. Think of a small clear coat nib sander, or a two-handled 10" polisher that uses bonnets. Those are single action orbital tools.




A random orbital tool offers dual actions (hence the term DA,) both orbit and random rotation at the same time. Most palm sanders on the market are of this type, especially in the automotive world.

 

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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I did some research on DA air sanders and I don't think my compressor will offer enough air. I do have a 5hp direct drive compressor. Maybe I can borrow my friends compressor and parallel them to get a little more air flow but one can only get so many CFM from a 1/4" hose.

I do not think I'll ever attempt to do any more stainless steel restoration except what goes on the Nova so it makes it hard to justify the cost of a true DA sander and a compressor. I should have looked into this a while back and got myself prepared but with so many other things going on to get the body work done, it just got pushed back.

I do have two Dremels and have used them for lots of things especially since I invested in some diamond chip bits. They really do a number on soft metal. What I am afraid of with the Dremel is the surface shine might looked wavy because of the small buffer wheels. I did use it on some aluminum pieces and it did a fairly good job but those pieces didn't turn out near the quality of GTL polishing.

Because of the difference in the pattern of the DA and Orbital, will that mean a big difference in the surface of the stainless right before it goes to the buffer? I was planning on using 1200 and 1500 disk for the final cut before moving on to the rouge.

My reference videos on Youtube:



 

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All the trim I've done has been by hand, starting with a file and working up through the grits. I am really good with a DA but I think it would be to easy to screw a moulding up using one.
 

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If your compressor won't keep up, then why not buy something electric? You can get a very powerful electric DA that will definitely do small trim work.

If you're trying to keep it very budget-minded, you could always buy a Harbor Freight (Hazard Frought) 6" DA and swap the backing plates to a sticky-back unit and use sanding discs.
 

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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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Discussion Starter #8
I bought different grits of sandpaper today and am going to do it by hand up to the time for buffing. Yesterday I got a piece that was the worst of what I had but the scratches weren't real bad and used 400 and 1500 on that piece. I was amazed that I actually sanded out the scratches so that encouraged me to buy the other grits and see how that works. it was labor intensive because I only had two grits but I'm thinking this will work by just doing it by hand without a DA. Wish me luck! :yes:
 

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Hi Guys


Personally I wouldn't let a DA sander anywhere near trim, for starters it will put swirl scratches in your trim and they will be a pita to get out, My advise would be, A small block and wet and dry paper go up through the grades starting with something like 500 grit if your trims are bad and working all the way to 1500-2000 grit. then instead of spending your money on a DA sander buy a bench mounted polishing mop and soap. and final polish with that,

Cheers Ian:uk:
 

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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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Discussion Starter #10
I selected the worse piece of reveal trim I had and started the process with 220 grit and progressed through using 320, 400, 600 and that's where I'm at now. Had to stop for other car related stuff but will continue when I can get back to it. I had a couple of dents that I did manage to bump out but I have to say as a beginner it's a challenge for me. I'm sure if I had the right tools that pros have it'd be a lot easier.

I have ordered an Eastwood kit with the right hammers and anvil so I'll see how it goes when they arrive.
 

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1969 Nova . . 2dr . . Chino Valley,Az USA
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Hi Sam

I'd say to take an old part .. find a section with a small dent. Knock the dent out ...then, sand just that area , then put a straight edge on there.

Most likely you will have a small "wave or small dip in that spot" .
Not really what you want too end up with. My point : try too make long strokes and avoid the small waves or dips ..... see what I mean.
Try too use a "block with your sanding (or near the end of your sanding) ... to help keep from causing 'dips / waves' . It takes time & some practice. I did something like u'r doing ... I wanted to polish some parts on my airplane .... so, i used my 350TH trans -- for sanding, then for polishing (just trying too learn) ................ then, ended up having an OK tranny 'shinny' housing ... never get seen.
These type jobs are good learning and great for when the weather turns bad ... keep going -

and, the "DA sander" ... on your trim ------------ more likely too make MORE waves .... good for body / sanding --- you could use it: but takes more time to perfect-using-it , & will / could "yank-that moulding" right outa-u'r-hands ... ......... .......
I'm just saying ...... have fun ...... just thinking out-loud.

jim

ps : I have about 13-14 years using a DA ...... w/all types paper ....
just my 2cents ...... later. short - cuts don't always work.
 

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1965 2door HT Helena, GA 31037
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
After reading what you guys had to say about the DA sanders I just decided that I'd wing it with the sand paper and a sanding block I picked up at Advance Auto. I got stalled with the stainless as the body shop wanted me to spend a few days with him getting things done before the body goes to paint.

The Lizard sound coating went on the under side of the roof and floorboard this morning. The Ceramic heat shield Lizard skin is going on Monday morning then it's onward to painting the fire wall and then block sanding the body and painting next Saturday if all goes to schedule.

I don't know if his way is a good way or bad but he swears it'll be OK. He painted the hood, trunk, both doors ahead of time. I questioned that process but he said if I see any thing that doesn't look right, he'll fix it but says he's done that for many year without any problems.

The Argent Silver got put on the trunk Friday morning and it looks nice.

He is going to put all the exterior trim on the car except the Peak Molding as it's looking like GTL will not be finished with it by next week. That's my fault as I waited to late to send it to him. Hopefully I'll be able to get that on when it gets here. I have all original clips for that job and it doesn't look like it's going to be to tough.

I removed the photos of the Nova as they were way to large and have created another thread to allow me to follow up with more progress of my Nova. Thanks for the encouragement guys.
 

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1969 Nova . . 2dr . . Chino Valley,Az USA
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looking really good ..............

and,



to me -- red was always a good color to paint , I'd say he's good to go.
I'm liking the color ..... jim
 

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Ian, please explain the polishing mop and soap a little further, show a pic if possible. Thanks

Mike
Basically its the same as a bench grinder only it has tapers instead of threaded spindles, to which mop heads (basically material cut into circles like a grinding wheel) are attached, soap is just a trade name given to the polish, Which is available in different grades, I'm sure some one like harbour freight will sell this type of polishing equipment.

cheers ian:uk:
 

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1973 Custom hatchback
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I have very little polishing experience other than brass in the military.

I want to polish my SS trim, or some of it that I cant replace. like the door window trim, rear window etc.

I did polish my front bumper. I cleaned it up with , among other things brake fluid, and then hit the nasty stuff with with red scratch pad. I then used mothers polish with a battery powered drill and a cone foam polisher, sold to clean wheels.

It came out very well , especially for a 45 year old FRONT bumper.

I bought an assortment of cloth polishing bits, and some rouges of different compounds. I have the mothers and some semichrome as well. I intend to tape off the SS (Is it SS? IDK ) trim while its on the car and go to town. I don't want to remove the trim now as it will come off when one of the body shops actually follows through with Prep and paint. I am not concerned with the paint as its trashed. From reading this thread I think I may be on the right track, or at least not off track, for my goals anyway.

I'm just doing what I can while I wait on "paint".
 
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