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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Would you say this is repairable, or should i start shopping for a new subframe? I was planning on just getting coilovers, arms, and new bushings everywhere, but if this will be enough to make me need to replace the subframe then most of those parts are included with the TCI subframe

what subframe is the best value options for a car that is going ot be mostly street and see a bit of track time. I already am looking to get a 4 link rear so if i get a new subframe then i need to make sure the rear will be compatible with the front.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can't say unless you post a picture of the crack.
Pics attached in op, not sure what happened, first pick shows the crack it's right in the middle rear area.

I just don't want to drop 7-8k on this but not sure if a weld would hold long in the area.

My entire front end needs to be redone, so I'm looking to put 2500 into it anyways once I add new brakes arms coilovers and all the bushings. So another 3-4k to get a new subframe would be the rouse if go if this area is risky weld.

Also check out what is in the coils any idea what these are? I was thinking about trying to get them out but not sure why they would be there. Never seen them before. Looks like a broke off socket extension.


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Weld that up and forget about it. Very common to have cracks or tears in that part of the subframe from people putting jacks there.

Those "broken off Sockets" are spacers used to raise the front end by keeping the spring coils apart. Used them a lot in the seventies. Jack up the car and use a ratchet and extension and just twist them out.
 

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I would have it welded by an experienced welder. Just make sure its straight and square before welding.

The aluminum thing in the spring is what is known as a “twist load” spacer. It is to correct a sagging spring. Remove it by turning counter-clockwise with a 1/2” ratchet and extension.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would have it welded by an experienced welder. Just make sure its straight and square before welding.



The aluminum thing in the spring is what is known as a “twist load” spacer. It is to correct a sagging spring. Remove it by turning counter-clockwise with a 1/2” ratchet and extension.
Ok going to try removing them, hopefully it sits level and nothing hits after I remove them

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Weld it

You will obviously benefit from an aftermarket subframe like TCI. However, if it's going to be mostly street, I would just weld it/have it welded and use the money elsewhere. As stated earlier, make sure it's car is level before welding.
 

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I'd clean up the crack well with a grinder and find the end, then drill a hole just beyond the end of the crack so it doesn't spread. Then weld it up. Should be no issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I would have it welded by an experienced welder. Just make sure its straight and square before welding.



The aluminum thing in the spring is what is known as a “twist load” spacer. It is to correct a sagging spring. Remove it by turning counter-clockwise with a 1/2” ratchet and extension.
So to make sure it's square what areas should I be checking. Would I just take some measurements to the ground in various places, and then measure distances from the firewall?

I don't see any noticible bent areas on the subframe. Other than the front edge being bent up, but the thicker supporting area seems ok.

I did notice that the bumper on the drivers side is about half inch closer to the body than the passenger side. But the body looks straight. Most likely just an issue with the bumper bracket not being in the right spot. It looks like you can slightly adjust the bumper.

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Lift Point

Professor Fate opines that the crack was due to the car being lifted at that point.
For an A body, such as a Chevelle, lifting at the front cross member is acceptable. For an X body the front cross member is not listed as an acceptable lift point. It just isn't strong enough. As it is such a handy place to raise the car, someone may have developed a means of strengthening the X body front cross member, and I would like to know about it.
 

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So to make sure it's square what areas should I be checking. Would I just take some measurements to the ground in various places, and then measure distances from the firewall?

I don't see any noticible bent areas on the subframe. Other than the front edge being bent up, but the thicker supporting area seems ok.

I did notice that the bumper on the drivers side is about half inch closer to the body than the passenger side. But the body looks straight. Most likely just an issue with the bumper bracket not being in the right spot. It looks like you can slightly adjust the bumper.

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Measure all places you mentioned but don't put a lot of stock in the frame-to-ground numbers because they are dependent upon springs, tires, wheels, etc. I would also place a angle measuring device on top or bottom of each frame rail to make sure they are level with each other. Check for a "diamond" in the frame by measuring from the rear of one side frame rail to the front of other side frame rail and again with the other frame rails; similar to an "X". These two measurements should be nearly identical.

Yes, the bumper brackets should have some adjustability with slotted holes.
 
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