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I'm about to pull my hair out.. I have a 62 with a 383 TPI 9.6 to 1 compression.. I just purchased the Summit 380325 radiator.. I have my temp guage in the left head and the ecm temp gauge in the front of the intake... My temp guage is running around 210 to 230 going down the hwy.. The ecm is telling me its 200 to 212 with a 195 thermostat. Heres my theory about thermostats.. The thermostat opens when the engine water gets to 195 and the water flows from the engine to the radiator when the cooler water from the radiator hits the thermstat it closes and when that water gets to 195 it opens again and the process starts all over..

Here is my questions..

Is 200 to 212 running to hot for around the intake and is 210 to 230 at the cyl head to hot..

I also read the Griffin radiator "Thou Shall" quotes and it says to over driver your water pump.. What do you guys think..

And what do you think about electric water pumps on the street..

thanks Mitch
 

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Mitchc said:
I'm about to pull my hair out.. I have a 62 with a 383 TPI 9.6 to 1 compression.. I just purchased the Summit 380325 radiator.. I have my temp guage in the left head and the ecm temp gauge in the front of the intake... My temp guage is running around 210 to 230 going down the hwy.. The ecm is telling me its 200 to 212 with a 195 thermostat. Heres my theory about thermostats.. The thermostat opens when the engine water gets to 195 and the water flows from the engine to the radiator when the cooler water from the radiator hits the thermstat it closes and when that water gets to 195 it opens again and the process starts all over..

Here is my questions..

Is 200 to 212 running to hot for around the intake and is 210 to 230 at the cyl head to hot..

I also read the Griffin radiator "Thou Shall" quotes and it says to over driver your water pump.. What do you guys think..

And what do you think about electric water pumps on the street..

thanks Mitch
If you over drive the water pump, it may circulate the coolant too quickly and not give the radiator enough time to remove the heat.



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In SOME applications for the street, electric water pumps tend to push too much water through the engine not allowing enough time for heat transfer. Geez, some of them are pushing 34-37 gpm!!! The problem with running a thermostat with some of these is that that high volume pump is trying to push the water against the closed thermostat that's trying to cycle. Like an air compressor trying to pump air into a tank thats already full. I don't think thats a good thing. Most just experiment with restrictor's in lieu of a thermostat or gut the thermostat and leave the housing to slow down water flow. But you may need to play with your current set-up, like a lower temp t-stat like stated, or ensure you have a good draw through your current radiator with a shroud. Hope it helps you, as it sounds like a really good motor combo! Dale
 

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Sounds to me like you guys slept through the heat transfer class in high school physics, where they explained Newton's laws of cooling. Newton's law states that the greater the temperature difference between two mediums, the greater the heat transfer. The hotter you can get the outlet of your radiator, the better it works.

Put simply, if you slow the flow of water down in your radiator, it will be less efficient and your engine will get hotter. Mr Stewart, of Stewart Components puts it bluntly:

Higher coolant flow will ALWAYS result in higher heat transfer.

http://www.stewartcomponents.com/tech_tips/Tech_Tips_6.htm

More interesting reading on engine cooling:

http://www.arrowheadradiator.com/14_rules_for_improving_engine_cooling_system_capability_in_high-performance_automobiles.htm
 

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i ran a electric water pump for a couple years on the street with no problems in the summer i would see temps up to 100 deg and never had any overheating problems
 

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Mike Goble said:
Sounds to me like you guys slept through the heat transfer class in high school physics, where they explained Newton's laws of cooling. Newton's law states that the greater the temperature difference between two mediums, the greater the heat transfer. The hotter you can get the outlet of your radiator, the better it works.

Put simply, if you slow the flow of water down in your radiator, it will be less efficient and your engine will get hotter. Mr Stewart, of Stewart Components puts it bluntly:

Higher coolant flow will ALWAYS result in higher heat transfer.

http://www.stewartcomponents.com/tech_tips/Tech_Tips_6.htm

More interesting reading on engine cooling:

http://www.arrowheadradiator.com/14_rules_for_improving_engine_cooling_system_capability_in_high-performance_automobiles.htm
Thanks Mike. I knew I hadn't imagined this conversation the last time we had it and this same point was debated heatedly. :D :rolleyes:
 

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It varies from car to car. The Durango Deuce 331 runs about 180°, the 454 tow truck runs about 230°, my 406 runs about 190°, my Corvair is unmeasured, and my Beemer runs about 1/4 up the scale.
 

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Maxturbo said:
You've got the theory right! :)

I'd stick in a 180 thermostat to get those upper end temps down. They are approaching the TOO hot range (although the intake temps are Ok now) come summer you may find out the hard way. :(
Apparently you don't have the theory of thermostats right. The thermostat in a car is not like the one in your house. It doesn't regulate maximum temperature. It only regulates minimum temp and speeds warm up time. If installing a cooler thermostat could lower the "upper temps" then what would happen if you installed a thermostat that opened at 30 degrees F? Ice? I don't think so.
 

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25% faster water pump speed + Stewart hi flow stage two water pump + hi flow thermostat = cool running Nova;) .

Never any heating problems since following Stewart website advice. Jack Wilson is a great guy.

Tg
 

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Paul, IMO you have the uncanny ability to nit-pick and call out folks with out justification or cause on the silliest things. Where did I say that a thermostat "regulate's maximum temperature". :confused:

And while I'm on the subject...Mike, where did I elude to raising coolant FLOW with reference to your...."Sounds to me like you guys slept through the heat transfer class in high school physics." comment?

It's sad. BOTH of you fellows are intelligent and posses a wealth of knowledge at your finger tips to share, yet you often choose to come off arrogant and demeaning.

Wussup guys? :confused:
 

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It's sad. BOTH of you fellows are intelligent and posses a wealth of knowledge at your finger tips to share, yet you often choose to come off arrogant and demeaning.
I will take smart guys that might be a little arrogant and demeaning on my team any day :D .

Tg
 

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Staying out of all of the other stuff. The thermostat only establishes the minimum opening temp. Once a thermostat is open, which either one would be at 210, the flow is what the flow is. It doesn't matter if its a 165, 185, 195, or 205. There are higher volume thermostats, but that is based off of the opening, not the temperature.
 

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Mitchc said:
I'm about to pull my hair out.. I have a 62 with a 383 TPI 9.6 to 1 compression.. I just purchased the Summit 380325 radiator.. I have my temp guage in the left head and the ecm temp gauge in the front of the intake... My temp guage is running around 210 to 230 going down the hwy.. The ecm is telling me its 200 to 212 with a 195 thermostat. Heres my theory about thermostats.. The thermostat opens when the engine water gets to 195 and the water flows from the engine to the radiator when the cooler water from the radiator hits the thermstat it closes and when that water gets to 195 it opens again and the process starts all over..

Here is my questions..

Is 200 to 212 running to hot for around the intake and is 210 to 230 at the cyl head to hot..

I also read the Griffin radiator "Thou Shall" quotes and it says to over driver your water pump.. What do you guys think..

And what do you think about electric water pumps on the street..

thanks Mitch
What do you have for a fan setup?
 

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Paul Wright said:
Apparently you don't have the theory of thermostats right. The thermostat in a car is not like the one in your house. It doesn't regulate maximum temperature. It only regulates minimum temp and speeds warm up time. If installing a cooler thermostat could lower the "upper temps" then what would happen if you installed a thermostat that opened at 30 degrees F? Ice? I don't think so.
Makes perfect sense.:) Thanks Paul.
 

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This puny 350 I just dropped in my car will go without the fan forever! I let it sit in the staging lanes idling for 15-20 minutes tonight trying to get it to 190! On the street, if you're moving at all, the fan isn't needed. I have a Griffin aluminum radiator and cheapy Pro-form electric water pump. I ran the old Moroso electric pump for 6-7 years. No cooling issues with it, and it only flowed 19 gph--new one is 35
 

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Maxturbo said:
And while I'm on the subject...Mike, where did I elude to raising coolant FLOW with reference to your...."Sounds to me like you guys slept through the heat transfer class in high school physics." comment?
"You guys" was a statement covering a couple of the previous references in this thread, not you in particular. You didn't elude anything but you did state 'You've got the theory right!', which I took to mean you were alluding to the cooling hypothesis as it was presented.
 
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