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Discussion Starter #1
Ok im wanting to check the body of a 1971 Nova to make sure body is Square before I hang new sheet metal I don't want any unwanted surprises can any one help me on how to do this
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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I've never really seen a method to check the overall squareness but it can be approached in steps. First knowing that your sub frame is within spec's, there are guides for that in the manual. There are several points on the sub frame to measure to make sure it is not tweaked. Second is knowing that your sub frame is installed squarely with relation to the rear half of the car assuming that the rear axle is installed properly because you will be making wheel center-line measurements on each side to ensure the frames are squared up. Lastly are there any obvious alignment issues of your existing sheet metal up front that can't be reasonably shimmed to correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok Maybe I used the wrong terminology I am replacing the rear quarters and they have had a lot of hard years so I want to make sure every thing will fit like it should are there any measurement I can make the sub frame is good and bolts up to the body fine door gaps are off from side to side and the door hinges are welded in from the factory so any info I can get before I start would help a lot
 

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Years ago I helped a buddy of mine that was rebuilding a 69 Camaro and we gathered together two very straight 2x4's maybe 7' long, an assortment of blocks to were we could make matching heights of stacks.
Since we were pretty sure that the top of the firewall by the factory alignment holes would be a spot we could span across the car from the left side to the right side, we positioned some blocks and then place the 2x4 across this area.
We then picked a spot in the back of the car. On this one we stacked a very high amount of blocks off of the trunk floor directly above the frame rails. The height of the blocks then allowed us to place the second straight 2x4 across the tops of these stacks.
Now I told him if the car has no twist, then if we look from back to front directly down the middle of the car using the top edges of these 2x4's then if there is no twist, the reveal will be identical. If there is a twist, you will see that the top edges of the 2x4/s are not even with each other.

What they call using what I described above is "Winding Sticks" so if you do a search, seeing how this works might be explained in better detail than what I have offered.


Also too, when I replaced both full quarters, both rear outer wheelhouses, the taillight panel and a big section of the hatchfloor, I had a spot in the garage that from under the car to the garage floor I tack welded in some square tubing and after I cut the original metal off the remaining structure twisted as evident by a lifted tube or two. By then placing weights abve these tubes to get them back into contact with the garage floor I could then put on the new metal knowing the old structure was where it was before with the old metal on it.

Jim
 

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the car is divided into 3 sections, there are holes in each side for measurements, the most critical is the center section under the passenger compartment. Do cross x measurements of the center section, if they are good then you can do x measurements of the rear and front section. all measurements start from the center section forward or backward.
 

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If the gaps on your car are good now you are probably ok, hanging a quarter panel is no different than putting a fender on,other than once you weld it there is no more adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If the gaps on your car are good now you are probably ok, hanging a quarter panel is no different than putting a fender on,other than once you weld it there is no more adjustment.
Years ago I helped a buddy of mine that was rebuilding a 69 Camaro and we gathered together two very straight 2x4's maybe 7' long, an assortment of blocks to were we could make matching heights of stacks.
Since we were pretty sure that the top of the firewall by the factory alignment holes would be a spot we could span across the car from the left side to the right side, we positioned some blocks and then place the 2x4 across this area.
We then picked a spot in the back of the car. On this one we stacked a very high amount of blocks off of the trunk floor directly above the frame rails. The height of the blocks then allowed us to place the second straight 2x4 across the tops of these stacks.
Now I told him if the car has no twist, then if we look from back to front directly down the middle of the car using the top edges of these 2x4's then if there is no twist, the reveal will be identical. If there is a twist, you will see that the top edges of the 2x4/s are not even with each other.

What they call using what I described above is "Winding Sticks" so if you do a search, seeing how this works might be explained in better detail than what I have offered.


Also too, when I replaced both full quarters, both rear outer wheelhouses, the taillight panel and a big section of the hatchfloor, I had a spot in the garage that from under the car to the garage floor I tack welded in some square tubing and after I cut the original metal off the remaining structure twisted as evident by a lifted tube or two. By then placing weights abve these tubes to get them back into contact with the garage floor I could then put on the new metal knowing the old structure was where it was before with the old metal on it.

Jim
Good info thanks I will give this a try
 
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